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Japanese Matchlock Accessories.


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I have started a new Pinterest board on the subject of Japanese matchlock accessories. If anyone has pictures of items they do not mind contributing and or proper terms both in English and Japanese this would be very helpful. Having these images and terms easily available in one place will make it much easier form people to correctly identify these types of items in the future. I have already added some items I own along with a few others found online. Anyone know the term for blackpowder?

 

https://www.pinterest.com/worldantiques/Japanese-matchlock-accessories/

 

#1 Teppo ashigaru (matchlock foot soldier). 16th century. #2 Hayago (quick load cartridge). #3 Dohran or Douran (for holding hayago). #4 Ko-yaku-ire (the smaller priming powder flask). #5 Karasu-guchi (crow's beak) for dispensing Tama (lead bullets) and Tama-bukuro (bullet bag). #6 Hi-nawa (match cord). #7 Danyaku-bako (Ammunition box). #8 karuka (ramrod). #9 Kayaku-ire (coarse gunpowder flask).

 

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Personally I can't use Pinterest, so I avoid clicking on anything linking there. Many images of my own photos do seem to be there though!

 

As in the correct descriptions above, gunpowder is and was 火薬 Kayaku, and retrospectively speaking today, to emphasize the older type, blackpowder is called 黒色火薬 Kokushoku Kayaku.

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Personally I can't use Pinterest, so I avoid clicking on anything linking there. Many images of my own photos do seem to be there though!

 

As in the correct descriptions above, gunpowder is and was 火薬 Kayaku, and retrospectively speaking today, to emphasize the older type, blackpowder is called 黒色火薬 Kokushoku Kayaku.

Thanks for the terms Piers, why cant you use Pinterest?
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As in the correct descriptions above, gunpowder is and was 火薬 Kayaku, and retrospectively speaking today, to emphasize the older type, blackpowder is called 黒色火薬 Kokushoku Kayaku.

Speaking of gunpowder, here is a Japanese blog about gunpowder, the English translation is not to precise unfortunately.

 

https://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/yamasemi8913603/15601846.html

 

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According to the only literature on the transfer of guns, "gunshot", the guns arrived at Tanegashima is the event of August 25 (a lunar calendar astronomy 12th, 12th, 2012) of Astronomy 12 (1543).

The island main shrine Tanegashima Time bought two huge guns, ordered Shinobawa Koshiro to prepare the black powder to be used in the fireworm gun and ordered the swordsmith Hakka Kimbei Kiyofi to replicate the fire gun.

 

The raw materials of black powder are three types of nitrate (potassium nitrate), sulfur, charcoal.

The mixing ratio is 60 to 80% for the stone, 10 to 20% for the sulfur and 10 to 20% for the charcoal.

Sulfur and charcoal could also be procured at Tanegashima, but as minerals (smoke nitrate, flame nitrate, salt water) could not be collected in Japan, it seems to have had trouble in procurement.

 

Therefore, pay attention to the fact that a small amount of stone can be taken around the floor or the toilet, mix a mixture of soil and grass, a carcass of animal and so on, manure, river, coral reef, etc in a special place, erode it by the function of bacteria and take out the stone I figured out a way.

Tanegashima also has Salt Nita (near Nishinomota Shimanto Temple) to create a stone, and a stone monument is built on the site.

 

This is a story I heard from people living in Minami-ko town, but in the old days the islanders were also ordered to procure materials for the stones, digging holes for urinate in the garden and banks of each door, and white crystals I was paying the island mainly to the island.

The hole for that urine was called "Shoben mound" and it remained in his grandfather 's garden.

Perhaps, there may be this "Shoben mound" around an old private house that still remains.

If you know something, please do not hesitate to contact us!

 

There are two kinds of black powder usually used as a propellant as it is, and a method using the black powder as a fire retardant. The container also contains a propellant case (photo right), a fire extinguisher (three on the left of the photo) and so on.

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  • 2 months later...

Hello Guys, :)

Hi Eric  :)

I don't know if this will help.

I just got this Kayakuire...

Looks like an Egg Plant shape.

The parts on the Netsuke move.

The top trigger is spring loaded.

I am just getting into Japanese firearms, after watching Kagemusha..

Thought this was a nice little collectable to have.

 

Alton Takata :)

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Hi Alton

The ‘Netsuke’ looks like a toy, (what does the pan look like?) but the powder flask looks genuine, and it could well be Japanese, although granted it is an unusual shape. A Nasubi shaped Kayaku-ire, hmmmm....we like that idea!

(Hard to see properly and a shot of the opened stopper would be great if possible.)

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This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one, unless your post is really relevant and adds to the topic..

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