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No..not fakes. We have discussed it before. When unlicensed blades are found in Japan, and people are unwilling to go through the entire licensing/registration process (or they are Showato) then they chop them into little itty bitty pieces like this.
This is the result.

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No..not fakes. We have discussed it before. When unlicensed blades are found in Japan, and people are unwilling to go through the entire licensing/registration process (or they are Showato) then they chop them into little itty bitty pieces like this.

This is the result.

I did not know that you are allowed to keep the parts. I thought, if the police in Japan confiscates a blade the owner never sees it again.

 

regards,

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If they are not considered historically or artistically worth preserving, the police will chop them up. Guns too. As far as I know, people are welcome to the pieces. I have half of the blade of a spear, for example. You may often find that a signed Nakago with a short section of blade has been used in Japan for flower arrangement, for example.

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They are nice little curios if you can get them cheap, especially to study blade construction, I picked up this one a few months ago and it has given me alot of pleasure looking at it closely through a magnifier now and again.

 

 

post-3926-0-19994700-1495607791_thumb.jpg

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Nice composition and shot.

Thank you, they really can be nice decorative pieces.

 

Do you have any examples of the nakagos used in flower arranging?

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No, but I probably know someone who does. There is one at the Osafune Sword Museum which they use to illustrate skin steel and heart steel in the blade cross-section.

The spear tip mentioned above:

 

post-416-0-72933000-1495721731_thumb.jpg

 

post-416-0-93545700-1495721764_thumb.jpg

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Since the articles destroyed by the police are considered weapons, it seems to follow that they were not made traditionally, so what can be learned from them? And if they were traditionally constructed, why were they destroyed?

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Hi Steve,

 

unlicensed blades, even if they are antique and traditionally made, get destroyed if the owner is not willing or able to let them registered and licensed.

 

 

 

regards,

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Thats sad that they chop them. Wouldnt be quite as bad if the pieces were donated to smiths to recycle in with tamahagane to be used. All the best.

 

Greg

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