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Translation Please!


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Hi Philippe look closer at the middle Kanji, it's not quite what you think it is.

 

Clue: count the strokes....... you will find it on this page in the N section.

 

http://www.japaneseswordindex.com/kanji/kanji3.htm

 

 

When you work it all out, there's a listing of a swordsmith using the name here, along with his real name:

 

http://www.jp-sword.com/files/seki/gendaito.html

 

 

Gambatte!! :thumbsup:

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  • 5 years later...

 

On 6/26/2016 at 11:38 PM, cisco-san said:

Hello,

 

MITSUNAGA (光永), Shōwa (昭和, 1926-1989), Gifu – “Mitsunaga” (光永), real name Noguchi Heiichi (野口平一), born July 5th 1918, he worked as guntō smith

 

i believe I too have a katana made by Mitsunaga. Is there a good resource to find out more about the sword maker? Seeing the dates above, I have to assume that the one I have was likely a spoil of war from WWII, does that seem correct?

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On 10/3/2021 at 6:27 PM, Quinn said:

 

 

i believe I too have a katana made by Mitsunaga. Is there a good resource to find out more about the sword maker? Seeing the dates above, I have to assume that the one I have was likely a spoil of war from WWII, does that seem correct?

Hello, very few information English sources available. As I know Markus Sesko is working on a Gendaito book but as I know not finished yet. Most of the sources are in Japanese.

Yes WWII blade.

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6 hours ago, cisco-san said:

Hello, very few information English sources available. As I know Markus Sesko is working on a Gendaito book but as I know not finished yet. Most of the sources are in Japanese.

Yes WWII blade.

Thanks for getting back to me. I posted in the main nihonto thread with a link to a folder of pics of my sword, as well as information I gathered so far. From what others have mentioned there, it seems the blade is much older. Possibly Shinto era. There must have been more than one smith who used the name Mitsunaga then. 

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Dear Quinn.

 

It is very common to find a number of smiths using the same name, sometimes with different kanji.  For example Hawley lists three Mitsunaga signing with the kanji on the sword in the original post and about 15 more signing with another kanji for naga. 

 

All the best.

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