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Jakushi Tsuba.


Dr Fox
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Hi, just thought I would add that looking at a tsuba in sunlight can help spot that very bad red rust or at least that has been my experience. Well I think I remember seeing the sun with all these storms can't remember. Years ago I found a lot of broken ivory on ebay. The piano keys are a great shape to use for rust removal. Good luck.

Ken

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Oh yes the sunlight did the trick, what i have is a red appearance on the iron parts of the tsuba. So I don't feel happy rubbing away with a bone of some sort, so is there a form of preservative for this use?

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Red rust is active rust and must be eliminated. Bone is softer than the iron but harder than the rust so it will not damage your item. Always be careful along gold or inlays. It does take work though but it is the conservative route. Spraying something on there to remove can be risky since you don't know exactly what the chemicals are going to do. I am sure there are some directions out there on how to clean a tsuba. Perhaps someone can recommend a set to use. Best of Luck.

Ken (aka the mantis dude aka Ken on the east coast).

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Antler works well, elephant ivory is better, but the # 1 implement for tsuba fussing is a piece of mastadon ivory. This stuff is harder and denser than elephant ivory but still less hard than iron. One piece lasts forever or nearly so.

A note on cleaning the Jakushi tsuba. Be very careful; the gold is easily lost. Before you try ivory you should try warm water and a soft bristle brush; some of the red should disappear. Next step up would be a fibreglass pen (search NMB for more on this tool), being careful not to touch the gold. Only if red remains after the pen should you consider the denser tools.

Grey

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Grey that goes some way to ease my worry on aggressive methods. A fibre glass pen I have for cleaning electrical contacts. And a pig bristle shaving brush will serve as the first part of your advice.

 

General MacArthur. ("I will return".)

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A little warning on fiberglass scratch pens. They are not all the same. Some are much harder than others and can easily damage a tsuba. I recommend this one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/181256142811?ss ... 1423.l2649

I have used it successfully. I still think that ivory is a better way to go. Go gentle with the pen. You cannot get back what you remove. :)

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me do like Jakushi Tsuba!-and i think that´s an good exemplaire here... :)

 

you could equally use deer-horn btw...just keep care in solving the shell before!

the white(core) is fitting very well,too! (after mine experiences...

do not use any of such abrasive on softmetal!

only on forged iron spaces!....

 

Christian

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Following Matt's offer I have one or two if you would like them Dennis. PM me if so.

 

All the best.

 

 

Geraint thanks, yes I will take you up on that. If I have spares then I can help out, as you have both done for me here.

Will PM.

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me do like Jakushi Tsuba!-and i think that´s an good exemplaire here... :)

 

you could equally use deer-horn btw...just keep care in solving the shell before!

the white(core) is fitting very well,too! (after mine experiences...

do not use any of such abrasive on softmetal!

only on forged iron spaces!....

 

Christian

 

I see from what you say, its the iron that needs the treatment, keep away from decoration and with this in mind, I would need to turn the materiel into a broad pen or pens of different widths.

 

I have picked up your like for Jakushi work, I have sought out examples on the web, and see what they could look like. At a later date I will repost this tsuba for comparison.

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Grey

 

What a nice example to compare too. Checking this one, it also has a carry over of design on the rim. Suddenly I now appreciate the tsuba in hand as an art object. Oh dear its like having one foot in the boat, and the other on the dock. Looks like exploring another dimension on a limited income.

 

Please rest assured, I shall follow all the advice given here as to restoration, and thanks to all who took the time to give it.

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