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Can anyone tell me what this style is called?


Robert Housley
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Jyabara ito nihonkumiage, I believe. John

I do not agree.

In this style the cross over would be twisted as in the normal nempu -maki style.

In this case the visible croosover is in the Tsunami style, therefore I would call it an

"Kiodai Murasaki Jabara Maki "

If this ist correct, the crossover of the stings underneath this visible crossover in tsunami-maki will be in nempu technique.

 

Greetings from snowy Berlin

Stefan

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It's called Kiodai Murasaki Jabara Maki in Thomas Buck's book, and I believe the example wraps are made by Takao Ichinose?

 

But I believe Kumiage Maki is correct, see Kensen's answer in this thread: http://www.thejapanesesword.com/forum/v ... f=29&t=133 And Florian's linked pic is made by Yasuo Toyama and it's also called Jabara Kumiage Maki.

 

But regardless of the correct naming, that style of jabara maki is very nice. :)

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It's called Kiodai Murasaki Jabara Maki in Thomas Buck's book, and I believe the example wraps are made by Takao Ichinose?

 

But I believe Kumiage Maki is correct, see Kensen's answer in this thread: http://www.thejapanesesword.com/forum/v ... f=29&t=133 And Florian's linked pic is made by Yasuo Toyama and it's also called Jabara Kumiage Maki.

 

But regardless of the correct naming, that style of jabara maki is very nice. :)

 

Thanks !

Just learned another thing :)

It hought the difference is the style of the upper crossing.

Well, nobody is perfect and I am definitly not nobody. :lol:

Greetings

Stefan

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The correct term is indeed Kumiage-Maki (組上巻). Btw, "murasaki" means "purple".

I am sure that Your translation is correct.

That rises a question : The maki in Mr. Bucks Book on Page 76 ist wrapped in golden-brown ito.

Nevertheless it is called : "Kodai murasaki jabara maki"

Why ?

I do have an theory, but I can not proof it.

Osoraku ist the Name for tanto with extrem extended kissaki. This type is named after an hori on the probalbly first osaraku-tanto by Shimada.

Later works does not have any hori, but they are also called "osoraku"

So the Name of the hori is ident with this type of tanto.

 

Is it possible that there has been a famous tsuka wrapped purple in this style ?

If the answer is "Yes" it could be indeed the same effect as in the osoraku tanto.

This would support my thought that there is a technical difference between the two styles which is not only based on the colour of the braid.

 

Greetings to all from Berlin

Stefan

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I have the greatest respect for Mr. Buck, and own his book as a reference for wrapping techniques. However, it would have greatly benefitted from proof-reading in regard to the Japanese terms. There are quite a few misnomers and mix-ups concerning colors, materials and styles.

 

Here are a few examples:

 

pg. 42: mempu 綿布 = cotton

pg. 44: gampi 雁皮 = a paper made from Diplomorpha sikokiana, also called kigami 木紙 ("wood paper")

pg. 34: kusube 燻べ = smoked leather

pg. 58: kumiage 組上 ajirokumiage 網代組上

pg. 60: tō (fuji) 藤 = wisteria (rattan)

pg. 64: kami-hosoyoroi 紙細縒 = narrow twisted paper strings

pg. 69: buyō 武用 = "military/war use"

pg. 71: kojidai 古時代 = ancient times

pg. 75: kodai-murasaki 古代紫 kumiage 組上

pg. 78: often used in Shōnai 庄内, but usually called shinomaki 篠巻

pg. 82: often used in Shōnai 庄内, but usually called karamemaki 絡巻

pg. 84: Shōnai tsuka 庄内柄 dashi-menuki-tsuka-maki 出し目貫柄巻

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Dear Grey

 

Sorry Grey but I do not do Jabara - string wrap. I sat and watched Ichinose sensei do a string wrap

in the 1980's and while it was great to watch him do it, it is not fun to work with 8 - 1 mm wide strings.

 

The tsuka with the green ito has very good-looking open diamonds. It also looks to be 2 mm wide strings. I have not seen that on antique tsuka.

 

As Jussi noted

"But I believe Kumiage Maki is correct, see Kensen's answer in this thread: http://www.thejapanesesword.com/forum/v ... f=29&t=133 And Florian's linked pic is made by Yasuo Toyama and it's also called Jabara Kumiage Maki."

 

I can do the Kumiage maki. The tsuka at http://www.thejapanesesword.com was a tsuka that I had to rewrap. As you touched the old ito, it was turning into dust. It took a number of practice tsukas before I got the knack of this style.

 

later

david mcdonald

jswords@mcn.net

 

]

I bet David McDonald can do this.

Grey

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Sorry Grey but I do not do Jabara - string wrap. I sat and watched Ichinose sensei do a string wrap

in the 1980's and while it was great to watch him do it, it is not fun to work with 8 - 1 mm wide strings.

 

The tsukamaki in dark brown color is an 8 string jabara style done by the son of the head master of the Ichinose family.

Eric

post-369-14196894786973_thumb.jpg

post-369-14196894788387_thumb.jpg

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