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hamon outline in hadori polish


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Read carefully John's article and pounder it.

 

Look at the pictures of this Tokuju, look at the hadori hamon, there are togari which are not outlined in the hadori. It is a question of togishi and compromises.

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Reading the article that expresses Jon Bowhay's opinion on sashikomi-hadori I note that he says it is the feature of the hamon itself which determines which polish is used.

For example: "Sashikomi is primarily of value in dealing with Hamon that have a very tight Nioiguchi. It is of a technical nature by and large and does not allow for the great diversity of Hamon such as secondary Nie, Nioi and hataraki around and within the Hamon".

 

Can I ask...what type of hamon appears in the pic, strongly tight Nioiguchi line or a great diversity around and within the Hamon? Which polish did this hamon demand?

 

Regards,

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I know the blade is low end showato, (it was just an example picture), but the question I asked remains unanswered, so no, not a dead horse guys, I'd really like an answer...why doesn't hadori follow the hamon?

Or to put it another way, will someone please post a pic of a hadori polish that does follow the hamon outline? I ask again as I can't remember seeing a hadori that does follow the hamon and I'd like to know if it does happen.

 

Regards,

PS...I can post a more appropriate blade/hamon/hadori polish picture that illustrates the same point if it will make the question easier to answer.

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Not a good example Jean. I know that such a hamon tends to suggest hadori because of the lack of tight nioiguchi, but I was asking about examples such as that illustrated in my post.

As a matter of fact I have a converse question also, I have a hadori polished sword that seems to defy even the claims made about sprays of Nie, Nioi and hataraki etc and ...it has portions/peaks of the hamon/activity rising above and through the hadori edge line.

Why is this left undone?

Regards,

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The mechanics of any polish determine the "look" of the hamon, no?

 

George, we know your preferences. Some of us are in agreement, depending on the sword.

Sashikomi can be manipulated; just read 'The Art of Japanese Sword Polishing' by Setsuo Takaiwa to see how.

A vinegar etch of the whole blade could be construed as a 'sashikomi' polish. Is that what you want to see?

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Ah, no Lee, certainly not. I don't want any deceptions at all.

 

Maybe I should ask, if the fingerstone size and polishing techniques/mechanics of hadori determine the "outline" of the hamon, and, as hadori is by far the most superior of polishes (as many say) and is "here to stay", shouldn't the tosho stop making complicated hamon altogether and just do wide suguba (wide as a fingerstone) or a nice notare or an even smooth toran that "fits" the polishing style?...that way there would be no chance of the effect as shown in the OP pic or as on my own sword where "active peaks' protrude up into the ji. Why continue producing outlines that the togishi ignore or can't polish?

Just logic?

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