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MIHARA MASATSUGU from the Koto Period 1550 I just bought


bmoore1322
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Hi all,

I had another look at the pics and as Paul said, it may be saya rubbing I am seeing along the edge.

It is hard to be sure from these pics, so that is why I raised the possibility of suguba, as a hoso-suguba conrinuing into the boshi seems to my limited experience to be about right for sue Mihara as well as earlier Mihara, more so than gonome-midare with yakidashi. I have not had enough experience with this school to be definite about gonome-midare and yakidashi at the 1550 period however, so I asked the question.

 

Again, to Brian, these are not criticisms , but (hopefully) helpful comments. From the pics it seems you have found a nice, healthy, signed, late koto sword in quite good polish, so this is a GOOD start for sure (my first sword was a gunto klunker that looked like chrome plating! haha).

So, the nihonto bug having bit...welcome to yeeaars of fun!

regards,

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@ George

 

 

I appreciate the advice, and much appreciated.

 

Yes the sword does have Saya marks from the WW2 Saya it has been stored in, that will be taken care of as I plan on having a Shirasaya built for it, and a two piece silver Habaki built for it also.

 

Once I have it built, this one will be sent off for papers on it.

 

Brian

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1) Kiri komi needs to be examined more carefully as; a) it does not look like a kirikomi b) this kiri komi - crack of some sort could become a problem when it comes to getting this sword papered.

 

2) if this is such a good polish where exactly is the hamachi? Which should have been well defined and appropriately placed when the sword was polished. Which in turn may be a problem when it comes to having a new habaki made.

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There is no kiri komi, crack in the blade, and the hamachi where the blade begins where the habaki would rest is there, I have one pic of it, it is there, just did not post very good pics of it.

 

In the one pic, it does look like a crack, it is not you can a dark area just before it, that is the reflection of something, and not a crack, as there is no crack in the blade.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Brian

post-3540-14196838813646_thumb.jpg

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It is what is called currently as hako bore (chip) which can have been caused by anything.

 

Kiri komi are generally encountered on the mune side, parrying a strike was generally done with the back of the sword to spare the cutting edge, otherwise at the end of a battle, the cutting edge could look like lace :)

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Hi Brian.

 

For what it's worth I like the sword, probably because I have one like it. Hawley only lists one smith signing this way and gives a typical date of 1503 while this link, http://www.sho-shin.com/sanyo19.htm should take you to a lineage which has him working typically around 1501. I don't think it matters who owned the sword rather what matters is the smith who forged it and the sword itself. If I get a chance I will do some images of mine and the NTHK paper with it for comparison for you.

 

Enjoy.

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And how about that idea so to buy you some rather more insightful literature instead?

There´s an active forum member here-offering EXCELLENT literature for bargain(!) prices-

which some guys(like me) had paid twice or even more some years ago....

would at least make more sense in view of an conservative collector like me here-Not?

 

But?-who finally knows...Masamune 7 and YKB´s like Hoan are/is still missing...LOL!

 

Christian

 

 

Christian

I assume you are talking about Grey. If so I heartily concur. I bought my first Japanese language sword books from him last month. One on Sa Yukihide and another on Nagasone Kotesu.

He was great to work with. Sent the books while the "Check was in the mail" :) . What do I have? An entire treasure trove of information. As a maker who has chosen to emulate these two great smiths probably a lifetime's worth of study in these two books alone. Last month couldn't read a lick of kanji. Can now read Nagasa, Sori, Motohaba, Sakihaba, Nakago length, kissaki length. Shaku, sun, bu, rin and know their related lengths. Who knows what I will be able to read next year. :?: ;)

 

Not to curb your enthusiasm Brian but spend some money on books dude-$1300 would have set you up big time.

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Yes, the blade was accidentally put on eBay for sale by his wife, this has been taken care of as he has received the funds for it.

 

I had to go to Parma , Ohio for an MRI on the surgery I have to have done on my right elbow, and when i didn't respond to his wife, she had thought I didn't want the blade anymore, and of course she didn't ask her husband.

 

I hate going to the VA, but it's gotta be done.

 

Problem solved.

 

Brian

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes, I will learn from it, and it is a very beautiful blade, and the school part I'm not concerned with at it is true Nihonto, and the best one I have in my collection right now.

 

I'm contacting Fred Lohman today about having new furniture, and a shirasaya built for it also.

 

Brian

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Fred Lohman does work for Chinese and American production and custom blades. He's not a Nihonto guy.

He farms the work out to various craftsmen so you'll be getting pot luck on the quality.

As of late, even the cheap production katana guys are moaning about his lack of communication and poor work done.

 

"Everyone says"...

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No offense taken, I would like to know who you all would advise that I can send the blade to have new furniture, and a shirasaya made for it, I would love to find original period fittings for it, doubt that would happen though.

 

 

Please any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

Brian

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First decide if you want just a shirasaya or koshirae. Then if you choose koshirae do a little research (visual) and buy a tsuba that you like, then fuchi/kashira then send it out to get put together.

 

Or I have heard there are a few people who are good at retro fitting blades to existing koshirae, although I imagine its difficult..

 

It's all about what you want and screw the rest...!

 

Just my opinion..

 

Respectfully,

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  • 9 years later...

Total novice here... 

But looking at the Kissaki it appears the following statement I copied from Markus Sesko might apply :"  "check the interplay of hamon and bôshi. Is the bôshi a continuation of the hamon or does the outline of the hardening change with the yokote? If so, chances are high that you are facing a shintô work as in kotô times it was more common to let the hamon run out “naturally” into the kissaki."

I know the original post is old. I'm just trying to learn more.

 

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