Jump to content

twines

Members
  • Content Count

    10
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2 Neutral

About twines

  • Rank
    Chu Saku

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    North Beach Maryland USA
  • Interests
    Antique guns in general. Theater Politics Laughter

Profile Fields

  • Name
    Tom Wines

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. It is .45 Cal 11.6 to 11.3 MM. I live in MD and gun laws here changing and by the end of this legislative season we will be close to CA and NJ in absurdity. I am selling things I have while I still can a replace those things with antique. I used the word elite. So far I sold a United States marked 1774 Charleville, the nicest 5th Model Burnside I've ever seen, and a couple of run of the mill CW guns. I haven't got to the antique Parkers. I thought the match lock was worth between $1500 and $2000. I was sure because of the family of the maker. I make a few buck doing this by not doing quantity and treating people fairly. The bug I have is my learning curve. I love learning history. I used to rebuild antique furniture and then it got to big and to heavy. Guns are easier to carried. Thanks
  2. I have fallen in love with this piece. I have very broad interests in the history of firearms. I help people who inherit collections get fair prices. Those of us who are interested in the history are aging out. I want to buy this from the family that is selling a small but elite collection. What would be a fair price to pay. I want to be the caretaker of this piece and learn more about the history of firearms among the samurai. Help please..
  3. Thanks Brian escutcheon I under stand brass pins I understand, I got it. Do you know if the two makers mentioned are the same person. In his first email Mr. Yoshida name's Ikkansai as the first maker he named and Kunitomo Tobei as the second email he named Kunitomo Tobei. I think they are the same person. The the son Jushuku is named. I am totally confused Report post #4 Posted 6 hours ago
  4. You are going to have to dumb this down. Are the za surrounds what I am calling the chrysanthemum on the stock that seats the barrel retaining pins. I am in touch with Mr. Yoshida and don't want to make a fool of myself. I can speak the language of Civil War guns and WWII guns but I am woefully ignorant of matchlocks so please treat me like a kindergarten student. Do the "nails" belong where I see the three modern screw heads in the lock. I am asking Mr. Yoshida to find me parts from his restoration people. He has agreed to help. I think he is asking me for measurements on the za or what I am calling the chrysanthemum. My gun smith and I are discussing replacement "nails" for the three screws in the lock. I thought I sent Mr. Yoshida photo album but I may have just sent the kanji pictures. I will correct that error. Below is his latest response. In it you will note the name of the maker is different that the original maker named. Ikkansai is the first maker he named and Kunitomo Tobei is the second maker he named I think they are the same person but I am totally confused. I appreciate your help. Tom Dear Mr. Wines, > > > Happy New Year ! > > > I'm sorry for my response being late because of Year-end and New > Year holidays. > > I'd like to answer your questions. > > > First: about the name inscribed on the gun, 江州 藤兵衛・充俶. > > 江州(Goshu) is now 滋賀(Shiga Prefecture). > > 國友藤兵衛(Kunitomo Tobei) was born in 1778, and died in 1840. > > He was a gunsmith in Kunitomo and also a representative scientist > in those days of Japan. > > 充俶(Jushuku) was Tobei's eldest son. It has not been investigated > when 充俶(Jushuku) was born > > and died. But we know 藤兵衛(Tobei) got married in 1813 and died in > 1840. > > After his death, 充俶(Jushuku) succeeded to the name of > 藤兵衛(Tobei). > > What can be inferred from that is that the gun was made between > 1840 and 1860. > > > Second: 4 pictures you sent me. > > In every picture, the inscription part was enlarged. As I can't > see the hammer part, the inlays > > and the full picture of the gun, I can't make a comprehensive > decision on the gun. > > The overall length of the gun, the length of the gun barrel and > the size of the caliber are needed > > to make it. > > With such information, I think I can make more detailed comments. > > > Third: In your mail, it was written that the ramrod is 2 inches > short. > > It can't be 2 inches. It must be longer than the gun barrel. To > push gunpowder and gun ball > > into the barrel, hard wooden stick was usually used. So it is > unlikely that it was remade with > > modern threads. > > > Fourth: about the use of the gun > > The aim (gun-sight) on the end of the barrel can distinguish > military from personal. > > If you tell me the size of the chrysanthemum pin, I may be able > to find a proper one. > > > I will send you the material by another mail. > > > For more information about Kunitomo guns, please visit our website. > > > I wish you good health and success. > > > Kunitomo Gun Museum > > Director Ichiro Yoshida
  5. Hi, https://imgur.com/gallery/N3hExgX I posted this before and got some great answers to questions. Now I am looking for a source for some parts. To the best of my knowledge the screws should be brass pins. The chrysanthemum for the middle barrel pin would be a nice find. I have a master gun smith to fit the parts if found. Thanks Tom
  6. Thank you for such great information. I am working with a master gunsmith and would like to replace the screws with proper brass pins. Can anyone recommend a source for rough cast or finished pins to be fit to the gun. Also wood like to replace the the chrysanthemum missing on the middle barrel pin. Happy New Year to all. https://imgur.com/gallery/N3hExgX
  7. Thanks. Some appear to have tips. Can't tell if the tips are brass or steel.
  8. Thanks can you post a picture of a ramrod particularly the tip
  9. Hi and thanks to all with a heart felt Merry Christmas. Here is a link to all the pictures https://imgur.com/gallery/N3hExgX/ I have been in touch with the Kunitomo Gun Museum. The director, Mr. Yoshida Ichiro sent me this most gracious and informative response, seen below. I sent him a list of question about the gun and will post his response. The serpentine head stops about an inch from the open pan. After the information from Bugyotsuji, I will photograph that aspect and post. Right now it is at a master smith. He is doing nothing to it until I get direction for Mr. Ichiro. At a minimum I would like to replace the screws with the proper pins. I hope the museum will sell me proper parts and my smith can fit them. Also looking for a mum for the left side barrel pin. The rod is metal and shown in the pics. It has been shortened and the threads are modern. The smith can make me a wooden rod and duplicate the tip if it is brass. Need some pictures of what would be correct and the type of wood. US stuff is usually oak or hickory, easy to come by. I do a pretty fair job of aging wood with gun powder ,oil, stain and water. For the record I would never try to pass it along as original. It has what appears to be what is left of a patch worm on the end. If it is correct the smith will add a piece to make it the correct length. Again I am waiting for the directors instruction before doing anything. Thanks again to all Tom the Hello, Mr. Wines. > > > Thank you for your mail. > > I am the director of Kunitomo Gun Museum in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. > > I read your mail and had a look at the pictures. > > > On the back of the gun barrel, I can see the kanji, 江州(Goshu:now Shiga > Prefecture) > > 國友藤兵衛(Kunitomo Tobei) 充俶(Jushuku). > > It shows that this matchlock gun was made by 國友藤兵衛充俶 in 江州. > > > 藤兵衛, known as 一貫斎(Ikkansai), was born in 1778 and died in 1840. > > He was a representative gunsmith and scientist in those days of Japan. > > He was the man who measured the weigh of air and made the air guns. > > He also made the reflecting telescopes and observed the surface of the > moon, the sunspots, > > Jupiter and Saturn. > > > 充俶(Jushuku) was a son of 藤兵衛. > > > There are many materials or references to 藤兵衛 in our museum. > > You wrote that you have a native Japanese friend. > > If you are interested, I can send you some. > > Please send me your address. > > > I hope my mail will help you. > > I wish you a Happy New Year! > > > Yoshida Ichiro > > The director of Kunitomo Gun Museum, > > JAPA Hello, Mr. Wines. > > > Thank you for your mail. > > I am the director of Kunitomo Gun Museum in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. > > I read your mail and had a look at the pictures. > > > On the back of the gun barrel, I can see the kanji, 江州(Goshu:now Shiga > Prefecture) > > 國友藤兵衛(Kunitomo Tobei) 充俶(Jushuku). > > It shows that this matchlock gun was made by 國友藤兵衛充俶 in 江州. > > > 藤兵衛, known as 一貫斎(Ikkansai), was born in 1778 and died in 1840. > > He was a representative gunsmith and scientist in those days of Japan. > > He was the man who measured the weigh of air and made the air guns. > > He also made the reflecting telescopes and observed the surface of the > moon, the sunspots, > > Jupiter and Saturn. > > > 充俶(Jushuku) was a son of 藤兵衛. > > > There are many materials or references to 藤兵衛 in our museum. > > You wrote that you have a native Japanese friend. > > If you are interested, I can send you some. > > Please send me your address. > > > I hope my mail will help you. > > I wish you a Happy New Year! > > > Yoshida Ichiro > > The director of Kunitomo Gun Museum, > > Japan Hello, Mr. Wines. > > > Thank you for your mail. > > I am the director of Kunitomo Gun Museum in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. > > I read your mail and had a look at the pictures. > > > On the back of the gun barrel, I can see the kanji, 江州(Goshu:now Shiga > Prefecture) > > 國友藤兵衛(Kunitomo Tobei) 充俶(Jushuku). > > It shows that this matchlock gun was made by 國友藤兵衛充俶 in 江州. > > > 藤兵衛, known as 一貫斎(Ikkansai), was born in 1778 and died in 1840. > > He was a representative gunsmith and scientist in those days of Japan. > > He was the man who measured the weigh of air and made the air guns. > > He also made the reflecting telescopes and observed the surface of the > moon, the sunspots, > > Jupiter and Saturn. > > > 充俶(Jushuku) was a son of 藤兵衛. > > > There are many materials or references to 藤兵衛 in our museum. > > You wrote that you have a native Japanese friend. > > If you are interested, I can send you some. > > Please send me your address. > > > I hope my mail will help you. > > I wish you a Happy New Year! > > > Yoshida Ichiro > > The director of Kunitomo Gun Museum, > > Japan below is there response Hello, Mr. Wines. > > > Thank you for your mail. > > I am the director of Hello, Mr. Wines. > > > Thank you for your mail. > > I am the director of Kunitomo Gun Museum in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. > > I read your mail and had a look at the pictures. > > > On the back of the gun barrel, I can see the kanji, 江州(Goshu:now Shiga > Prefecture) > > 國友藤兵衛(Kunitomo Tobei) 充俶(Jushuku). > > It shows that this matchlock gun was made by 國友藤兵衛充俶 in 江州. > > > 藤兵衛, known as 一貫斎(Ikkansai), was born in 1778 and died in 1840. > > He was a representative gunsmith and scientist in those days of Japan. > > He was the man who measured the weigh of air and made the air guns. > > He also made the reflecting telescopes and observed the surface of the > moon, the sunspots, > > Jupiter and Saturn. > > > 充俶(Jushuku) was a son of 藤兵衛. > > > There are many materials or references to 藤兵衛 in our museum. > > You wrote that you have a native Japanese friend. > > If you are interested, I can send you some. > > Please send me your address. > > > I hope my mail will help you. > > I wish you a Happy New Year! > > > Yoshida Ichiro > > The director of Kunitomo Gun Museum, > > Japan in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. > > I read your mail and had a look at the pictures. > > > On the back of the gun barrel, I can see the kanji, 江州(Goshu:now Shiga > Prefecture) > > 國友藤兵衛(Kunitomo Tobei) 充俶(Jushuku). > > It shows that this matchlock gun was made by 國友藤兵衛充俶 in 江州. > > > 藤兵衛, known as 一貫斎(Ikkansai), was born in 1778 and died in 1840. > > He was a representative gunsmith and scientist in those days of Japan. > > He was the man who measured the weigh of air and made the air guns. > > He also made the reflecting telescopes and observed the surface of the > moon, the sunspots, > > Jupiter and Saturn. > > > 充俶(Jushuku) was a son of 藤兵衛. > > > There are many materials or references to 藤兵衛 in our museum. > > You wrote that you have a native Japanese friend. > > If you are interested, I can send you some. > > Please send me your address. > > > I hope my mail will help you. > > I wish you a Happy New Year! > > > Yoshida Ichiro > > The director of Kunitomo Gun Museum, > > Japan
  10. Hello, I am new to the forum. My passion is antique military guns and sporting guns. Blades of all type interest me. I am dealing with a collection of antique fire arms and a matchlock appeared. I have dealt with several WWII era Samurai swords but this is my first match lock. I know very little about them. I am interested in finding any and all information. I am certain the screws are not correct. I would like any pictures containing the rivets that would be original to the gun. I am working with a master gunsmith who can make most anything. The ramrod has been shortened a rethreaded. I would like to know if the what is left the ramrod is it correct? With the addition of a piece, would the ramrod be correct. As I have studied, most examples of matchlocks I see have an external main spring. When the hammer is cocked the trigger releases the hammer and it gently drops to slightly above the pan. Is this correct? There are no wear marks indicating a main springs was ever present. I have seen a few example like this one. I would like to date the gun and know the maker. Again any information will be appreciated. Tom https://imgur.com/gallery/N3hExgX
×
×
  • Create New...