Jump to content

Robinson Velasco

Members
  • Posts

    40
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation

4 Neutral

2 Followers

Profile Information

  • Location:
    Queens, New York

Profile Fields

  • Name
    Robinsonv0211

Recent Profile Visitors

86 profile views
  1. Thank you Bruce, its actually a Nagamitsu. I posted some pics of a another one I'd like to bid on "Mondo no sho~ Fujiwara Masakiyo" with one-leaf aoi mon, and dated 1726. But if it's too high, I will check what you referred. Let me tell you, my wife is about to put me in the dog house lol. She doesn't understand, she has her purses and shoes, I have my swords and guitars. I always tell her, it's an investment I'm not wasting money! Then she tells me so is leaving money in the bank, that's an investment... smh! I don't win with her lol
  2. Last 2 pics of the "Mondo no sho~ Fujiwara Masakiyo" with one-leaf aoi mon, and dated 1726.
  3. Thank you Jean! Sorry about the mix up, it's actually Nagamitsu, but the bid just went too high.I'm looking at a "Mondo no sho~ Fujiwara Masakiyo" with one-leaf aoi mon, and dated 1726.its in bad condition. Bid ends at 2pm. I'll post pics. Let me see if I have any luck. I dont want to bid too much on it. I always have a limit of not going over 400. Do you think it's worth it? If not, I'll try here. Where would I look?
  4. Thanks Bruce, I figured it was a fake once I opened it up. I'm covered by ebay, the seller is trying to say that it is genuine Japanese hand forged late ww2 katana. I do have my eye on a niromitsu. Any suggestions where I can look besides ebay?
  5. More pics... sorry, but trying to give every1 all angles
  6. Hey guys. Just got a sword in from ebay. Yes I know, too many fakes. I gave one a chance from a seller who said he bought it from an estate sale and had his sword expert people confirm it was legit. It has no mei or stamp. I will be posting a lot of pics. I'm only a novice, but I think that this is a fake, I may be wrong and I hope that I am. But if I'm right then I have learned a little and I will return it. Please tell me what you all think. Thanks everyone, Robinson
  7. You are correct, wrong choice of words for me. It is something I do want to learn and I am aware that it is a skill that takes a decade to learn. As I get older, I will have more time to dedicate to this. I won't be going anywhere Mark. I want to know more and learn about Japanese swords both military and nihonto.
  8. More pics, if it helps... I bought it in 95/96
  9. Hey Bruce... lol, yes I understand. I will post the pictures of the January 1945 Hiromitsu 1 seki stamp and 2 gifu stamps.I also have a mumei wakizashi that I will put up later in the week and waiting on another katana, but it definitely will need to be inspected and hopefully it's not a china replica... that one is for another day when I receive it. It might have gotten lost or stolen in usps hands... its about a week late. If it is, ebay and paypal battle for refund. I hope it's just delayed.
  10. Thank you Mark. I know better now. This was a 1st time lesson learned the hard way. My 1st place of unnecessary and useless help was YouTube, I was desperate and less knowledgeable in my defense. Never again! I cringed after the vinegar bath and did my best to bring it back... the hamon is in need of some life though . I am the killer of swords! ☠ I am looking into buying the Japanese stones and maybe in a few years finally know what to do. A hobby to pass the time.
  11. Hello Mr Geraint. My apologies for this late response. I have some pictures of the other sword, but I do have a question in regards to my 1st sword I posted, the 1945 hiromitsu (not sure if its August or January because of their calander). Can it be possible, that this was a gendaito? Only because it has 3 stamps, which I read somewhere, that with a lacquered wrapped tsuka, a sword with 3 stamps, which mine has 1 seki and 2 gifu's, is rare to find and might be a private purchase and traditionally made? It needed to be pass inspection 3x because of this. Also I read that in seki, gifu province there were a lot of backyard Smith's working traditionally on swords for the military/govn't, then later on were approved and stamped for military use, which is why my stamps are badly visible, because it was stamped after approval and it was a private purchase? Just something I read on this forum, but I cant find the 2 threads... one was 2009 and the other 2015.Here are the pics of the 2nd mumei sword, I have to say it definitely is heavier. Maybe mid 1500s - 1700s? Battlefield armory sword? Maybe koto unsigned? My inexperience guess. Pictures are before and the one with measuring is after with the 24hr white vinegar bath and some wet/dry 1000-3000 grit sanding. I definitely made it look better, but might of harmed the hamon a bit and let the wash go to high on the nagasa. I also have a mumeiwakizashi to show later. Thank you and every1 that has helped me with my search to obtain a little more knowledge every day.
  12. Hi Bruce, sorry for the late response. I wasn't able to get on this site. Not sure if it was the website or the url connection. It kept telling me that I couldn't get access. To begin, I have a mumei katana I think that means unsigned if I'm correct, in gunto high decorative officer mount, correct me if I'm wrong please. Besides it being unsigned, it has 4 notches on the mune, between the mune-machi and mekugi-ana. I have do e various searches and I found that most sword experts, say that this is a koto/shinshinto. It's unsigned which matches the era when katanas weren't being signed. The notches where there to sort out the parts that went to the sword. Also it's what they considered castle armory for the foot soldiers or picked up from battles amd added to castle armory and the notches were added also for the correct parts. Now I do know that during the ww2, blades were signed and dated and or stamped, I know that was mandatory. One other clue that I think that this might be a shinto, is the weight. It is heavier than my hiromitsu. The only time when katanas were heavy was when Japan was introduced to guns amd samurai armour was made thicker to help protect against bullets. So when the armour was thicker the swords became heavier so they can have more effect when striking. Again, I will say, I am only a novice with novice eyes and just trying to put together a puzzle to get a clear picture of what i have. Would you still like to see pictures?
  13. Lol... nice to meet you Sir!! I'm only a padawan... a man with novice eyes. Would you mind if I get your expertise opinion on a second sword?
  14. Yes sir, I was reading fake or real Japanese swords online and they both fit the description, well the 1st one does, I couldn't tell on the 2nd... my novice eyes need further training, I am only a padawan.
×
×
  • Create New...