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J Reid

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Everything posted by J Reid

  1. J Reid

    shinsa agent?

    Honestly- I can't be more direct. He is your best option. 100%
  2. J Reid

    shinsa agent?

    Bob benson escorts blades to shinsa a couple of times a year. I would trust that guy with my life. He founded the american branch of the nbthk and was the first non-Japanese to receive an award for his skills in the art of polishing. http://www.bushidojapaneseswords.com He holds great conversation over the phone as well.. Best, Josh
  3. naginata is only $1410 now with iffy papers.. but still.. At least if you had purchased that, you would have something different to study rather than a rack of wakizashi. Best, Josh
  4. $800 and change from hitendo.. you should have bought the naginata man! $1450.. or the katana in matching handachi mounts for only $2450.. Best, J Reid
  5. Just wondering if there were any fellow nihonto enthusiasts in the general Toronto area of Ontario, Canada. Maybe even the Tri-cities? On a similar note- We need some kind of Nihonto club/ event in Canada. We have nothing (that I know of)!!! Best, Josh
  6. Sorry, let me re word that.. " IF the Mei says "Nagamitsu" -it's most likely gimei." .. It almost definitely says NAGA (something) though..
  7. Jean, nakago is Ubu. 1 mekugi ana. My apologies.. Josh
  8. Hey guys. So this topic has been busy since yesterday.. Okay so I know who Nagamitsu is and his profile in our world. I don't doubt that this is most likely gimei. I just figured it was exciting to find a relevant signature on a purchased "mumei" blade.. As for my original specs- I unfortunately didn't take time to thoroughly evaluate the aesthetics before I posted. I was just anxious for opinions on the mei alone and figured some specs were in order. But since it was 3 AM, I wouldn't say they're my best guess yet. At the time I wasn't up for some photography.. haha. I used john yumatos book for reference and that book is a good start, but lacking details, I find. After reading a couple more books my evaluation on the specs has of course changed. I did take some more pictures today though. Forgive my expert photography skills ( I used my Iphone ). URL: http://photobucket.com/nagamitsu Lets continue. Josh
  9. "Bizen Nagamitsu was the son of Bizen Mitsutada who was the founder of the Bizen Osafune School. Bizen Nagamitsu is thought to have begun production around the Bunei and Koan eras (1264-1287). There are some later works signed Sakon Shogen Nagamitsu from the Einin and Shoan eras (1293-1301). There is a school of thought that attributes swords with this signature to a second-generation smith Nagamitsu. I think that the predominate school of thought, however, is that there was only one generation." Josh
  10. Just a guess, friend. It could also be bizen.. I have a feeling this may be a 2nd gen attribution. I will post pictures of the blade later this evening! Josh
  11. Nagamitsu is a fair bet. Just by comparison... My eyes can't stop playing tricks now!! Bahh... Josh
  12. sorry the html link didnt work... heres a direct link http://i1113.photobucket.com/albums/k51 ... 013081.jpg Best, J Reid
  13. Hey guys. So I just picked up this wakizashi. I was told it was mumei and in the dealer photos it looks mumei to me. Upon receiving it I noticed it actually had what looked like a signature. Its practically illegible in my opinion and obviously his too. But just out of curiosity, can anyone make sense of this. Even if you can tell me what kanji you see, I really want something more to go on.. Blade details: -59.9cm cutting edge -muromachi period -mino den -masame/itame hada -notare with nie -higaki yasurime -kaeri-fukashi boshi -fukura-tsuku kissaki -deep torii Any thoughts?
  14. The second nakago ana is a dead giveaway for a blade made for iaido. Reallllllyyyyy nice blade for cutting. J Reid.
  15. Just so you know. Keanu reeves is half Japanese... I'm assuming they chose him to play this role with the intention of him being the intermediate real life version of the Japanese' take on anime-A Japanese person with an image of caucasion features. They commonly choose caucasion people with asian features to play these roles in films. Josh R.
  16. Thanks for the opinions. As for the sellers use of the word "cast". I do believe he intended it be used as another term for "forged" or even "decorated" with dragons and tigers. Etc. Best regards! Josh R
  17. Hey guys! So I was just checking out this Tsuba the other day. 19th C. Looks good to me, I think. What are you opinions on this piece? Original? A cast replica? I'm noooo good with identifying tsuba of this style.. I checked out the details.. Aside from the carvings being slightly crude, the "inlays" look decent, and overall piece looks of decent quality. OPINIONS PLEASE!! :? http://www.ebay.ca/itm/300736232294?ru= ... 3D1&_rdc=1 Best, Josh R.
  18. They're getting smarter. Now if only they would stop putting serial numbers on everything! Maybe try following details- they could actually reproduce NCO guntos. Josh R
  19. 100% fake. Without a doubt. Real NCO guntos have smaller arsenal stamps and the bohi extends further to the tip. This bears the signature faults. Sorry for your loss. Josh R.
  20. Steel was in such shortage that the Japanese basically used whatever they could in order to supply every breathing soldier with their own sword. "Gendaito" can only be so if it is traditionally made and constructed of tamahagane (Exclusively). If these swords you speak of were made of old muskets, than they were most likely half-breed swords, or showa-to. So answer being, if the sword was made from an old gun during ww2 specifically, than no, it most likely isn't made of tamahagane. Josh
  21. Steel was in such shortage that the Japanese basically used whatever they could in order to supply every breathing soldier with their own sword. "Gendaito" can only be so if it is traditionally made and constructed of tamahagane (Exclusively). If these swords you speak of were made of old muskets, than they were most likely half-breed swords, or showa-to. So answer being, if the sword was made from an old gun during ww2 specifically, than no, it most likely isn't made of tamahagane. Josh
  22. Thank you everyone for your replies. I totally agree with both opinionated sides. I was sure moses beccera was an experienced polisher, and that I can trust him with the repair, if I decide to sway that route. I will also shoot bob an email to see what he has to say. Chris- I like your straight forwardness. If its going to damage the blades polish, and make more work all around. If its going to be hard on the blade, and take years off of its life. Than as its keeper, I should let it be. Grey- I personally feel the way you go on when you state your opinion in your reply. I want to keep this blade, and I want it to be perfect! It will bug me. If an experienced polisher says he can take care of the kissaki within a reasonable cost, and not hurt the blade, nor polish, than hey, why not? It will only continue to bug me if I don't. If they say they probably shouldn't and I should let it be until the sword reaches a point of needing a fresh polish in 2150 etc. (haha) in order to preserve the piece, than as its keeper, I should respect and adhere to those words. George- I also agree with you. If the sword is set to be perfect, other than this flaw, and its reasonably possible to fix, than I should have it done. It can't be perfect, and not be perfect. Battle wounds are a different story. If the chips are there from being used, and polish to match. It holds a different aurora/energy to its current state. These can be acceptable in my eyes as well. So overall, I will seek repair, if it is safe for blade, polish, and budget. If not, I will love it regardless. Its still very sad though, as I know for a fact it got chipped by those goofs in customs handling this blade without any proper form Best regards to all, J. Reid
  23. Hey guys! So I am just looking for some opinions/input. I just picked up a signed and dated, no star stamp, Muto Hidehiro gendaito. Mint polish, original shirasaya, original solid silver habaki that was made to fit blade and shirasaya, papered tokubetsu kicho. Only problem is.. upon inspection I noticed the smallest, smallest( about 1mm, almost looks like it just wasn't polished to a perfect point), tiniest chip out of the tip of kissaki. I am a perfectionist, and it makes me sad to see this chip, even if it is so minuscule. I contacted moses today about a possible estimate, and turnover rate of fixing the chip. But I guess I am just looking for fellow collectors opinions on whether or not I should turn a blind eye to this chip, if its un-desirable, if this was your sword, would you be satisfied? will this make an impact in a possible future re-sale and should it be fixed to please aesthetically? It will make me sleep better tonight if I hear how the members of the board would feel if this was their blade. I guess I just need to hear that I'm going OCD over this chip and to just let it slide. NOTE: Compared to market values, I do have room for repairs, I just don't like sending my blades away if it really isn't necessary. Also I am sorry for the link. This is my first time trying to upload photos.. I am happy to upload more photos to my album upon request, I just stopped photographing as soon as I noticed the sad, sad chip. Best regards, J. Reid LINK: http://WWW.PHOTOBUCKET.COM/MUTOHIDEHIRO
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