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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/19/2022 in all areas

  1. 明治天皇御製 我國の為をつくせる人々の名もむさし野にとむる玉かき Poem from His Majesty, Emperor Meiji (roughly) May the souls of those who gave their lives for this country find peace here on the fields of Musashino
    3 points
  2. Well, while this is active I'll simply say I have a Tanrenjo blade in Shingunto koshirae with a mei similar to the one I illustrated back in 2020 (above). The sword is somewhat of a wreck and I've been 'gunna' write it up for some time now (there is a story!), but a certain teppou write up comes before that, so patience Ladies and Gentlemen... BaZZa aka Barry 'Gunnadoo' Thomas, Melbourne, Australia
    2 points
  3. Shuzan. 秀山 1915 to 1925, apparently. Look towards the bottom of the link. https://gotheborg.com/marks/satsuma.shtml
    2 points
  4. The old gentleman I bought these from is holding on to his father's kai-gunto. It is signed 特殊鋼以井戸秀俊作 which is Tokushu-kō motte Ido Hidetoshi saku. The first part, Tokushu-kō Motte is "Special Steel Mix". Best I have researched, and what I see in person is that it is a mix of stainless and carbon steel. He has owned all these swords for 35 years, when his father gave them to him. His father got the kai-gunto while fighting in Guadal-Canal. The others he got while stationed in Tokyo from 1945-1946.
    2 points
  5. 2 points
  6. Kozuka blade by Masahira to commemorate the 60th anniversary of NBTHK in Fukushima.
    2 points
  7. Not the same like yours but kind of close...
    2 points
  8. Gosh, just yesterday a RS with and unsigned blade was mentioned on another post...now you have picks of another one...amazing. In 50 years of collecting I have never seen mumei tangs in RS mounts and now ...2 in 2 days. Both mounts are 'low end' Seki RS mounts usually found on showato. Interesting. As they say, never say never with Japanese swords. Regards,
    2 points
  9. I would like to express my doubt concerning 4) as 'rising mist' (VARSHAVSKY collection). Mist or fog usually occurs parallel to the earth surface in nature, so unless the TSUBASHI did not intend the TSUBA to be seen in an unusual angle (which I have problems to imagine) I am not so sure about this interpretation. In other TSUBA mist or clouds are always depicted horizontally: I have seen rain depicted as big droplets (in KO-TOSHO TSUBA) or as fine parallel grooves, often in an angle, in later TSUBA.
    2 points
  10. I know some people might have very negative view on the old papers while others will have quite positive. I'd be somewhere in the middle grounds, I feel they are a one valid opinion given to the item. As far as "Jūyō" quality goes, I'd wager most very high quality items with old papers residing in Japan would have been already converted to the new NBTHK system. That is just following what I feel as common sense. Of course there could be that 1 in 1000 item that still comes out every now and then. Outside of Japan I would have bit more relaxed view on items however note that it might be incredibly difficult to tell when the item has left Japan. On sending tsuba and other fittings to modern NBTHK shinsa in Japan, note that current fee for Hozon is 17,000 yen (c.130€), and you'll need to add all the other expenses related to submission for that. I am not too well versed in tsuba market as I don't own single one nor look to buy one at the moment, however if I would be planning for an international submission of tsuba for shinsa, I would save it for good quality ones even at the basic Hozon level. If I would own a tsuba with green papers and it would be an ok one, I think I might not feel the need to send it for modern shinsa. Granted if I would be living in Japan I feel I might want multiple opinions from different organizations and people for my items, for learning and fun. I am just not a fan of sending expensive items internationally, and in modern day the costs are quite high (well tsuba can be shipped in smaller packages compared to swords ).
    2 points
  11. The examples I have seen did not include the Iyo Daijo title, but there is another one here: https://www-winners--auction-jp.translate.goog/productDetail/67404?_x_tr_sl=ja&_x_tr_tl=en&_x_tr_hl=en-US&_x_tr_pto=wapp
    2 points
  12. This appears to be a gendaito by Taira Sadashige, an excellent smith. 伊豫大掾平貞重作 - Iyo Daijo Taira Sadashige
    2 points
  13. Hi again guys, I'm not there as much as I would want to, but Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you for the kind words and such warm comments. To be honest, i think i even shed a few tears reading your posts. It really feels good to know and be friends with guys like you. We are a community and more, a family! I can't express how much reading you was comforting, so again, thank you deeply. I still haven't replied all the messages of support I have received and i apologize again for that, but rest assured I will. Last two weeks have been busy at work with the Covid situation and we keep having meetings on how to best manage the situation. Thank you again, I love you guys! JP
    2 points
  14. Further to your comment, George, on your “celluloid same” thread, I have made a new post to show my new (and first) “RS” shin-gunto. Today I closely examined the nagako under strong magnification. I wasn’t expecting find anything other than the painted characters which showed on the former owner’s pics, so I was delighted to discover a “Gifu-in-sakura” stamp! (thank you Bruce P, for your excellent article). Whilst the blade may not be particularly interesting to many, I’m very happy to have this well-preserved example. For me these RS represent much more than what one sees at face-value :-) I’ve attached a number of pics. Regards to all. Paul
    1 point
  15. I see a few similar characteristics in this hamon to the NBTHK certified Mino Senjuin that I owned previously. Namely, this part. Also, I really like that habaki! Looks like it could be an older one.
    1 point
  16. Here are some other photos that might be helpful:
    1 point
  17. Very cool! Thanks for sharing this. Have any closer pictures of the hamon? I'd like to compare it with a mino senjuin I had.
    1 point
  18. Hello everyone. This sword was found under the floor in an abandoned house. I think the number is useful for information.
    1 point
  19. Just acquired this okimono couple and would like to know the name of the artist and age please. I'd also like opinions on what the man might have been holding in his right hand so I could find a suitable replacement. I believe she has a lantern for night fishing and it's my opinion that he is holding a fishing basket so maybe he held a pole in his right hand? Howard Dennis
    1 point
  20. Thomas, vielen Dank! Ich freue mich darauf!
    1 point
  21. Hello Ckaiserca, Very nice koshirae ...congratulation. I have not seen this design very often on kodogu….but more often on chinese porcelain…. That is what i found about its symbol In Japan, its crowing, associated with the raucousness of the deities, who lured Amaterasu, Goddess of the Sun, out of the cave where she had been hiding. Courage is the virtue that the Japanese (like other Far Eastern peoples) attribute to the rooster. The white cockerel as an auspicious symbol Japanese Shinto or shrine tradition likely has its origin in Taoist practices that filtered through from the Chinese court during the Tang dynasty and Nara periods. Chickens are thought of as errand messengers of the gods at the Isonokami Shrine where many sacred roosters are seen roaming. Thanks for showing us Daniel
    1 point
  22. Volker, that is a massive medal with a thickness of 3 cm! Really? And is there a Buddhist relation indeed or a SHINTO? That would make more sense, I believe.
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. So if this is unusual, that makes 3 out of 4 that are unusual. The fourth being the "last ditch" NCO.
    1 point
  25. Is anyone else seeing 桃川 Momokawa/Tosen?
    1 point
  26. The look reminds me of the surface as it has been hammered, before the files and shavers make everything on a level plane. It is almost as if it was a rush job ...no one cares about the nakago... it's covered by the tsuka...get it out there where it belongs...hurry hurry!
    1 point
  27. Also just realized this has the celluloid same. So the RS and my Emura both have celluloid same. I've learned something tonight.
    1 point
  28. That's a tough one, I would lean to Showato. The sharkskin wrapping is commonly found on swords from the later stage of the war.
    1 point
  29. I'm with you on that one Jean. which is why I suggested maybe rain? ... of the torrential downpour type maybe? Otherwise, vertical "mist" doesn't make too much sense. Varshavsky was quoting a Sotheby's listing from: Professor A. Z. Freeman and the Phyllis Sharpe Memorial collections sale by Sotheby’s in April 1997 as №11 on pp. 12-13. was The tsuba even had hakobaki papers from Sasano. Varshavsky even suggests that these vertical bars with rounded ends could represent "scholar's scrolls", as described by Merilly Baird. That seems more plausible to me than mist, but then again, is it OK to cast doubt on something Sasano wrote about a particular tsuba's motif? I'll edit the summary to include this alternate view from Varshavsky.
    1 point
  30. "So where do we go from here?" I can hear you asking. Well, you could keep it as is, or find someone who can research and rebuild the missing parts. They were all handmade, so it's unlikely you will find a secondhand pan cover/lid will fit exactly. I would suggest printing out the information so far, on a small label for example, and attaching it to the underneath of the stand, etc. (For future generations, or for yourself when your memory fades!) If your husband is interested, you could start collecting the small accoutrements that a samurai gunner would carry, such as a firestarter kit, a Doran accessories waist pouch/box, matchcord, ballbag, ball mold, etc., even some simple armor bits. Live firing is an option in the US, but you'd need to get the bisen screw seal and overall barrel integrity checked first. Oh, the angle on the tape measure now suggests that the bore is over 2 cm, i.e. an O-zutsu big gun. 2.1 cm is 15 Monme' and 2.2 is 20 Monme'. 15 Monme' would mean the weight of the lead ball is 56.25 g, and 20 Monme' 75 g.
    1 point
  31. Although I have not come across the word Soemei before, it reminds me of Hi and Soebi, a groove in a blade, and a groove with a parallel groove, in other words, an accompanying thing alongside. The dictionary looks back to ancient Greece and Rome, and suggests agnomen and cognomen, second or third names, nicknames, honorary names, etc.
    1 point
  32. Hello Grey, Asai/Azai is Tadatsuna's own last name, and forms a part of his own signature on some swords. In Nobunaga's time there were several branches of the Asai/Azai, some who didn't face the same fate as the Azai who were persecuted by Nobunaga. Nowadays it is a relatively common last name. Uji means a kind of aristocratic clan name, much the same way that Fujiwara and Tachibana are clan names. Hopefully the above makes sense.
    1 point
  33. OK, unless there are any more options to add, I think it's SUMMARY time And again, these associations are not absolutes. I'm just trying to find distinguishing characteristics and differences... 1- long skinny, 2 sticks, with square ends: JOGI (measuring sticks/rulers) 2- thicker, 2 sticks, with square ends, side by side or crossing each other: HYOSHIGI 拍子木 (clappers/rhythm sticks)... which has connections to kabuki and battle signaling. 3- not sure if these would look much different from# 1 or 2, but presumably they would be perfectly parallel and level or also involve some perpendicular sticks too: SANGI 算木(counting sticks) like these maybe: an Owari example from Sasano stating "cross braces (Sangi)": 4- vertical parallel bars with with rounded ends (maybe a key feature here?), has two possible interpretations so far: a) NIBIKI (RISING MIST BANDS). This is how Sasano described these first two tsuba examples sold at Sotheby's. *Jean Collin notes in a post below, that "mist" is typically represented by horizontal bars that have a "flowing" connection to each other, and provided the third image (below) as an example. b) SCHOLAR'S SCROLLS. Sergei Varshavsky suggested this alternate explanation for the VERTICAL BARS with rounded ends, by referring to descriptions in "Symbols of Japan", by Merilly Baird. VERTICAL AND SEPARATE: HORIZONTAL AND FLOWING: 5- more than two and up to 8, staggered "blocks", that are touching/connected (usually accompanied by some type of garden or pond motif): YATSUHASHI wood plank walking bridges And just to totally mess with everyone, what the heck are these "I-beam" sukashi? from Yamakichibei?
    1 point
  34. Listing something special for New Year. A healthy, perfect signed and dated Nobutaka wakizashi with two sets of papers, Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho and Tokubetsu Hozon. Large piece in great condition with beautiful workmanship. Very fine ko-itame hada. Suguha-based hamon with a gentle notare and ko-midare in places. Small sunagashi and koichigaiba. Signed Hoki no kami Nobutaka. Ubu perfect nakago. In shirasaya with gold foil habaki. $5,500 (plus shipping and PayPal)
    1 point
  35. Dont feel bad Bruce, i cant remember last week let alone last year...lol 😂😢
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
  38. Grev, Thank you for this (unsolicited) post. Just for the record, as a Gold member, you should be able to edit your post for 2 days after. Please check by clicking on the 3 dots top right of the post? I don't really want to get involved in this thread, but I will say that limiting sales to Gold members is tempting (most of the other collector forums I know do that) I don't want to go that route. I want to leave it open for a person stumbling upon a sword in an estate or at a sale, to be able to sell it here and offer it to the members without having to pay anything. So I won't charge a fee or a subscription to sell or buy here. That is one of the perks on the NMB. BUT...that said, there are people with over 30-50 sales who have never subscribed or contributed a cent. So be it...it's their choice. But I MAY consider a limit to have many items a non subscriber can list at a time. It's something I have been thinking about. The average person can still list a few items a month. But regular and frequent sales should come with some sort of give-back to be fair. Nothing set in stone yet. I'm still debating it in my head. Especially since it has come to my attention how many HUNDREDS of sales come from pm discussions and don't even make it onto the forum. How many..I have no idea. But feedback I'm getting is that some people make a tidy living from pm sales. Thanks again to all those who do support us with contributions, memberships, percentages of sales or even just helping with info.
    1 point
  39. Just a drop or 2 of oil on the fingertips, while handling the tang and rubbing a little will stop the active rust. Nothing more than that needed unless the rust is thick and flaking (unusual)
    1 point
  40. Did someone say "Beetlejuice" three times? Yes, the Chicken still lives, but has been away for a time now, with military/riot shotguns supplanting the nihonto itch. You may thank (or castigate) BaZZa for trolling up this fowl member. I hope to attend the No. Cal. Token Kai this year after two misses due to Covid and cancellations. It is, alas, time in life to consider de-accession as opposed to accumulation and find new caretakers. Have no feeling at this time as to the nihonto market place, need to study up here, I guess. The koshirae that kicked off this thread are indeed quite nice, very refined. I have a near complete chicken set, rather beefy, minus the tsuba, that are more "over the top", but no candidate sword on which to fit them. Oh, well. Anyway, hi to all who remember da Chicken, fondly or else. I will try (and likely fail ) to abstain from further recommending the Jim Kurrasch power uchiko method for removing clouds and rust fron newbies' swords. Hope everyone here had a great winter solstice season (is this PC enough?), and have an equally rewarding 2022.
    1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. I think that is just the photographs using a flash.
    1 point
  43. Cool to see this published in the most recent Token Bijutsu magazine
    1 point
  44. Personally, I think it looks great ... and how could you not put those menuki together with that fuchi & kashira? I also like that you chose a more reserved tsuba to balance things out. Congrats!
    1 point
  45. Hi everyone, I'm thinking about staring my own personal collection of Japanese blades. Any pointers as to how to go about it? I go to shows and get to see private collections every now and then. I'd like to collect examples that are worth holding on to regardless of condition, as long as there have no fatal flaws. The collectors I know on Cape Cod have very deep pockets. They just buy and never sell which doesn't work for me as I don't have a blank budget. Any tips and/or tricks would be helpful. I'm new here and frankly don't know much. I do know that authentic shinsha origami are a plus to have. Best, Khalid
    1 point
  46. Polish looks fantastic. I'm glad you restored it, even if some curmudgeons gave you an earful.
    1 point
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