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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/03/2021 in all areas

  1. Have I posted this one before? No idea, but with Australia's lockdown laws, I am looking for something to do. I picked this up ages ago from a collector that didn't like the polish, his loss is my gain I guess, I LOVE it! A Hokke Saburo NOBUFUSA, no date, in my view a very good smith. It also helps being in mint mounts as well. I acknowledge the page from Slough's wonderful book.
    6 points
  2. Thought some may find this interesting, found from an ended listing: https://buyee.jp/item/yahoo/auction/j1002004371
    4 points
  3. Hi, 1st kanji is 明 . WWII era Seki smith Akitoshi 明寿 ,real name OHNO Yuichi 大野勇一 .
    4 points
  4. Niji mei Norimitsu 64 cm. Polished by Woddy Hall. Saya by John T. In stone finish. Tsuka with crain f/k wich have hozon paper. Tadpole menuki, frog in the reeds tsuba, lined up the fuchi crain is about to feast on frog. Remarkably good shape for being close to 600yer old. No chips or kizu, boshi in tact. May be a pit are two but nothing distracting. Was slated for shinsa that did not happen. Price reflection do to lack of papers. This restoration was the labor of love through some trials and tribulations with the tsuka in Japan being wrapped. Time in money wont be recoped. Sorry im going to be very selective on who I approve to purchase. If I haven't known you for years on the board you must have a reference from someone in the Nihonto community, trust me they must carry some weight. $4200 shipped to my mates across the pond i cant offer a refund policy. I hope you understand. State side im offering a three day grace. Must have back in hand same as i sent to be refunded minus shipping cost. Many pic to come please give me some time before posting.
    3 points
  5. 芸州住源綱慶作 Geishu ju Minamoto Tsunayoshi I think. Fairly uncommon yoshi afaik, only that signed this Tsunayoshi worked in Kanbun, Hiroshima area
    3 points
  6. Sorry, no apologies for raining on anyone's parade here, but just as exciting as receiving a freshly polished sword may be, and it is, the truth is that unless the sword has been polished by an excellent polisher the end results may be in both the long and short term not quite up to par ending in disappointment. And what could be worse is that the recipient may not have the background to properly assess the result or know the difference. After all, ignorance is bliss. In the end the sword owner may find out by receiving a disappointing and poor shinsa result leaving them wondering how that was possible without ever understanding why. Oh, yes, a shiny "new" sword, but what if some of the most critical factors like foundation and finish were not executed quite up to snuff or even incorrectly (for the sword)? Since, according to the Japanese, kantei is the very foundation for nihonto appreciation, wouldn't that make the choice of selecting the right polisher for the sword most critical? Which brings up the question of how do we really know? By simply asking? By looking at actual examples of the polisher's work (traveling to sword shows or participating in club events where you have the opportunity to see polished swords)? Choose wisely, do your homework. Just food for thought.
    3 points
  7. Here is a real treasure for someone! Good luck with the sale!
    2 points
  8. A pleasure to see an fine blade with real sashikomi polish, not the "acid enhanced" version as normal in our times.
    2 points
  9. A gorgeous piece in very tasteful fittings Stephen!
    2 points
  10. @Stegel Here is my 2 Wood handle 95 ,both scabbard has 3 digi #,blade has NO Ser# but Seki mark.
    2 points
  11. Where to begin? There are several statements presented here as fact that are simply wrong. Ford is obviously the best person to make corrections but I’ll give it a try. 1) While there are chemical treatments that can turn copper black, they are not Japanese patina treatments. 2) Shakudo color depends on the gold content of the alloy and this changed over time. Older shakudo contains between about 1 and 10% gold, a trace of silver, and a trace of arsenic, the Ag and As being impurities. Some lead and iron are sometimes found. The shakudo I’m most familiar with is about 5 to 7% gold and is basically copper color but with a tinge of pink before it’s patinated. I’ve never seen brass or gold colored shakudo. 3) Shakudo does not have a high content of silver. Copper and silver make shibuichi and the color varies with the concentration of silver only after patinization. 4) Kuromido is an alloy of copper and arsenic that also starts out copper colored but turns dark brown to black when patinated. However, kuromido does not acquire the “crow feather” black of shakudo. Hope this helps.
    2 points
  12. Hi, The mei says Sankei + Kao 算経 http://www.shibuiswords.com/ELsankei-seal2.html
    2 points
  13. H is right, there is not much point restoring these as really good examples are plentiful and nobody wants one that has been tampered with. Keep it and sell it for a better one or get your money back. What this does have going for it is the officers tag, perhaps getting that translated first will determine what you want to do with it.
    2 points
  14. Here is a (Kojima) KANEMICHI,1941, and Seki stamp. This is a high-grade Showato blade, which the original owner thought enough about to put it in an aluminum saya, with the rare extended drag. Thanks to Slough for the page from his book.
    2 points
  15. I agree with Kippu and Bruce on this one, Blade has been cleaned and last digit being faintly struck, was removed. A nicer picture Cliff, sharper and higher resolution in better lighting would help further. I have added some examples from the serial number range which we suspect your sword is from, and there are some with the last digit being very faintly struck for you to see. The scabbard is the first that i have seen with 2 digits, i have seen them with 3 and the orientation of the numbers is correct, however the blades are all in the 300k range. BangBangSan has a few aswell, i tried to find the thread where he posted but had no luck. So i believe the sword is a Pattern 5, with the last digit of the serial number missing (possibly to over polishing in the past), the scabbard i tend to think is mismatched with another from the 300k serial range, just prior to the introduction of the Pattern 6 version from the Jinsen Arsenal. These have wooden scabbards which are not numbered, and the handle although appearing similar, is more thicker and larger. BTW- Geoff, please post some clear photos of your swords numbers, 5 digits doesn't sound right to me at the moment.
    2 points
  16. I am a little unsure about the first kanji of the mei, but may be 昭壽 – Akitoshi 昭和十九年一月 – Showa 19th year, 1st month (Jan. 1944)
    2 points
  17. its a dress version, so its so common and affordable you could either replace it or butcher one for parts. but be warned the wire will be brittle when re wrapping
    2 points
  18. Shinsakuto daisho by Gendai swordsmith Iyo Matsuyama Ju Seiken - Dated July 1988 Katana and wakizashi in full koshirae, along with shirasaya and koshirae insert for saya, and matching brocade sword bags. (pattern pictured behind menuki photo) Kogatana with the wakizashi. Simple fuchi-kashira with mountain/shrine theme tsuba and kirin menuki. Polish on both blades is pristine. No damage and have never been used to cut. Both sword still have ubu-ba. Impressive swords in both size and weight - gunome midare with heavy sunagashi and kinsuji worked in the ha. "The real name of the Yasuken (Yasukuni) swordsmith is Gouda Toshiyuki, born in 1926, living in Heiwa-dori, Matsuyama, Ehime. He learned Soshu-den from the family of living national treasure swordsmiths Tsukiyama Teiichi and Takahashi Sadatsugu, and was introduced to the swordsmith Torio Hiromasa in 1939. In 1944, he began making swords at the Torio Gunto Forging Factory. In 1970, he was introduced to Sakai Shigemasa, who further refined his sword making skills. He is a member of the All Japan Swordsmith Association and has received many awards including the Special Prize and the Award for Effort." According to this resource, this smith has been papered by either the NBTHK or NTHK. https://www.japaneseswordindex.com/gendai.htm Please see attached photos of blade in hand, as well as the original photos from the seller in Japan, which include specs/dimensions. Additional specific photos available upon request. Please PM with specific questions. Looking to ship/sale within the continental United States. $7500 shipped/insured. A couple link examples of the same smith from other vendors: https://www.aoijapan.net/wakizashi-iyo-matsuyama-ju-seiken-hori-dosaku/ https://www.trocadero.com/stores/meijibijutsu/items/1215403/Katana-Koshirae-by-Iyo-Matsuyama-Ju-Seiken https://www.e-nihontou.com/html/upload/save_image/esg20101158049314589.jpg
    1 point
  19. I had some free time today and was clearing my sword collection. I did a few quick iPhone pictures of a Kanemoto (兼元) katana new to my Japanese sword collection that is suriage (磨上) with an orikaeshi-mei (折返し銘). I have never had a sword with this type of inscription before. I was planning to submit this sword to shinsa but now questioning if I should after reading Facts and Fundamentals of Japanese Swords by Nabua Nakahara, translation by Paul Martin. On page 78 in a section of focused on different types of inscriptions (mei 銘) he states: "Many orkaeshi-mei are actually skillfully tailored fakes. The part that is bent back on itself at the new nakago-jiri is actually another mei that has been attached at that location to give the impression of orikaeshi-mei.". The cutting-edge length of my katana is 27.5 inches (68.8 cm). It was sold to me as a early generation Kanemoto from the late Kotō (古刀) Era. Here the few iPhone photos I have. I would like people’s opinion of my orikaeshi-mei but as always keep it informative and polite.
    1 point
  20. Awesome hamon and those tadpole menuki are so so well crafted and neat. Such a cool sword.
    1 point
  21. Wow! Gorgeous @Stephen! And excellent presentation. Impressive
    1 point
  22. Having a hard time getting through the rust. I can only get the last two… YOSHI SAKU
    1 point
  23. Gorgeous katana Stephen, the fittings are beautiful and that hamon line is very unique. Good luck on your sale someone is gonna be very happy with this one 😊.
    1 point
  24. Item No. 108 - Iron Tsuba with gold 76.9 cm x 7.12 cm x 0.56 cm Subject of peony and shi-shi in sunken relief cave or caverns. Signed Yoshihiro- age unknown. Could this Yoshihiro be from the Myochin lineage ? If so it would be of considerable age but somehow it feels younger in the hand. High grade workmanship all round with painstaking details on the rock carving and a highly animated shi-shi almost leaping free from the plate. The peony, eye and bud appear to have been carved from solid gold . The plate itself showing pleasing grain structure , not untypical of Myochin , hence the question above regarding artist school. As usual , any comments , help or corrections gratefully received.
    1 point
  25. Thank you all, for you thoughts and participation I really appreciate it; as it helps me and hopefully others sharpen their skills. The pictures failed to truly capture the essence of this sword. It has an Oei feel to me which is one of the many reasons for the purchase. A good description of the smith and Oei provenance can be found here https://yuhindo.com/osafune-norimitsu-katana/. The sowrd is Bishu Osafune Norimitsu, Bunmei 9th, with NBTHK TH papers. Here comes another fun part, translation of Sayagaki.
    1 point
  26. Hello Everyone, I had my Katana out examining particularly the jigane/jihada and did a short video preview of the sword with my iPhone. This is my first time posting a video on NMB so I hope everyone a view it and enjoy. Kanemoto Katana Preview Video.mov
    1 point
  27. Its more or less certain that the blade is from 1550-1650 period. The boshi is not distinctive. Too common in my opinion. It widens a bit per Muromachi trait I guess, but not exclusively so. There is bo utsuri, maybe shirakke or dan utsuri. The hada is not well seen. It looks to me quite well forged and lacking mokume of the kind typical for Muromachi Bizen or Mihara. I don't see a lot of masame except some nagare around the ha, but if its substantial, then its still Mihara. If its not dominant, but the hada is more along the lines of well defined individual itame strikes, then its Hizen. The forging is also quite dense, not common in late Muromachi, but more along the lines of shinto. Could also be Bungo Yukinaga, but in their work the hada comes out less wet and more sharp.
    1 point
  28. OK, apologies for hurting your feelings, Chishiki Mark, but I am somewhat weary of many people not making an effort on this forum, constantly requesting to be spoon-fed and preferring someone else to do the work for them. Be that as it may, as I have a bit of free time, please refer to the Japanese-language version of the same website https://www.touken.or.jp/shinsa/fee.html and right-click and press translate (depending on your browser). This is what I have done, so the translation is linguistically imperfect but semantically clear. You are right, together with Curran, that the NBTHK Honbu often forgets about us gaijin, rarely updates the English info and also does not include in English nearly half of the otherwise available info that they have in Japanese. Disappointing it is indeed, and for those who assume that all info will be spoon-fed to us foreigners in English well, unfortunately it is not the case. It is not the case with some high-end dealer websites (with some exceptions), it is not the case with the NBTHK - just the basic info is served, it is not the case with the rest of Japan (we are more of an afterthought , but do not take it personally.) For some reason the headings in the table did not copy across properly - in the table below, the left fee is for members and the right - for non-members. You will see that the fees correspond to your tosogu charges and also I confirm that for one of my items, which got TH in July, I was charged the fee from this table as well. 'Save' herein below means 'preservation', denoted by 'hozon', and 'important' is the translation of 'juyo'. Again, these are Google Translate defaults. Examination fee ■ The examination fee varies depending on the examination result. ■ The examination fee will be stated in the result notification sent after the examination. ■ If the examination result is "pending", the examination fee is free. All examination fees include tax. Preservation / special preservation examination For save-only application Examination outcome Membership fee Non-membership fee Pass Sword / sword fittings \ 25,000 ¥ 27,000 Sword fittings ¥ 17,000 ¥ 19,000 failure Sword / sword fittings ¥ 10,000 ¥ 12,000 Sword fittings ¥ 7,000 ¥ 9,000 When applying for special preservation only (I already have a preservation certificate) Examination outcome Membership fee Non-membership fee Pass Sword / sword fittings \ 35,000 ¥ 37,000 Sword fittings ¥ 30,000 ¥ 32,000 failure Sword / sword fittings ¥ 10,000 ¥ 12,000 Sword fittings ¥ 7,000 ¥ 9,000 When applying for preservation / special preservation at the same time Examination outcome Membership fee Non-membership fee Save: Fail Sword / sword fittings \ 10,000 ¥ 12,000 Sword fittings ¥ 7,000 ¥ 9,000 Save: Pass Special save: Current status Sword / sword fittings ¥ 35,000 ¥ 39,000 Sword fittings ¥ 24,000 ¥ 28,000 Save: Pass Special Save: Pass Sword / sword fittings ¥ 55,000 ¥ 59,000 Sword fittings ¥ 44,000 ¥ 48,000 * If you pass the preservation examination, the examination fee is the total of the preservation (pass) and special preservation examination fees. * If you pass both preservation and special preservation, you will get a discounted rate only if you apply at the same time.  (Discount amount: sword / sword fittings \ 5,000, sword fittings \ 3,000) Examination of important swords, etc. Examination outcome Membership fee Non-membership fee Pass Sword / sword fittings \ 220,000 \ 240,000 Sword fittings \ 120,000 \ 140,000 Current status Sword / sword fittings ¥ 21,000 ¥ 41,000 Sword fittings ¥ 15,000 ¥ 35,000 Examination of specially important swords, etc. Examination outcome Membership fee Non-membership fee Pass Sword / sword fittings \ 340,000 \ 360,000 Sword fittings \ 240,000 \ 260,000 Current status Sword / sword fittings ¥ 31,000 ¥ 51,000 Sword fittings ¥ 21,000 ¥ 41,000
    1 point
  29. Yes, definitely a beautiful sword Volker. I also find these swords quite interesting as their lack of decoration on the back strap as well as a removable sakura blossum menuki/mekugi. The back strap and D guard in the photo below is quite plain without decoration yet exhibits a simple elegance... Dave M.
    1 point
  30. I guess period: Muromachi later school: Bizen smith: OSAFUNE XXXX
    1 point
  31. i thought you had to be a member to submit for Juyo??? I am more familiar with swords than fittings but maybe applies to both? Here is Bob Benson's info https://www.bushidojapaneseswords.com/nbthk-shinsa-submission.html NBTHK Shinsa Fees: See NBTHK's shinsa fees at http://www.touken.or.jp/english/shinsa_fees.html - If you are a member we will need your NBTHK membership number. - If non-member the NBTHK charges 2,000 yen extra on each item submitted to shinsa for Hozon and Tokubetsu Hozon. ( i.e: If your piece passes both Hozon and T. Hozon you will be charged an additional 4,000 yen on top of their shinsa fees.) -For a Juyo Token shinsa submission you will have to become a NBTHK member. -You can join the American Branch of the NBTHK at www.nbthk-ab.org
    1 point
  32. Quite gorgeous Volker (the sword, I mean!), and amazingly intact and well preserved. I agree with you, that blade is a beauty. Great feeling to know you have such a rare item, isn't it?
    1 point
  33. Exceptionally I will comment on the video posted by Alton. In 33.14 it is said that February and August are the best months for yaki-ire. But in those times these months did not exist and we were talking about the second or the eighth month of a year of an era that did not begin on January 1st of a year. Like what one can be learned and nevertheless say incongruities
    1 point
  34. Last I heard, he was taking a break due to work pressures.
    1 point
  35. Sorry, but this does not look Bizen to me.....Bungo is a different call to Bizen
    1 point
  36. Its a mid transition type8 to 19. I have commented on these locks in the past. In short itsba owner preference as it makes drawn/ strike faster as griping the tsuka releases the lock. No silly thumb stuff required
    1 point
  37. According to the NBTHK " Myoju's extant works are extremely few in number and of tachi there is only one example known ". That is a Juyo Bunkazai piece made in 1598 . Don't get your hopes up ! Ian Brooks
    1 point
  38. One more day, all opinions welcome, regardless the board gets a donation, have fun with this one.
    1 point
  39. Hello Edward, since you’re in the United States you can avail yourself of the fortune of having two fully qualified polishers: Robert Benson and Jimmy Hayashi both of who are classically trained and thankfully live in the states making shipment easier. I know for a fact that Mr. Benson is kind enough to answer questions via email, you could send him detailed photos of a sword and ask if a polish is warranted and he will give you a honest answer, even it is not to polish. Hope it helps.
    1 point
  40. Watched Ken Kata’s linked video for 30 minutes all in Japanese but could not see anything directly related. Was this the wrong video, perhaps? Anyway someone told me that there should be light, a hole at the foldover as if you could insert a pin or a toothpick right through it.
    1 point
  41. 1 traditionally-made Japanese WW2 gendai sword available. This fine antique Japanese sword would make an important acquisition for any collection. The blade measures 24 3/32” from blade tip to notch in the blade spine. The nakago is signed ‘Nagamitsu’. The hamon is complex. Condition: The blade has an occasional minor scratch. There are a couple of tiny nail-catcher type nicks in the edge—they are so small they are hard to see. The blade is in fair polish. The hamon and boshi are perfectly healthy. —Matt
    1 point
  42. BiShu Osafune ju Yokoyama Sukesada saku 60th generation not sure the next but usually Tomonari Keio 3rd year August (1867)
    1 point
  43. David Have you looked carefully at the very end of the nakago to see if you can see any indication that it was actually folded over not just inlayed? If you can see actually see a fold, I would doubt gimei; if not ?? Rich
    1 point
  44. I think Axel means that you can find clear photos of the Waka near the bottom of this thread: https://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/topic/36645-storage-box-lid-calligraphy/?tab=comments#comment-379998
    1 point
  45. Ha! Depends upon how badly a guy wants it! I paid $1,400 for a copper-handled 95 back when you could get regular 95s for $650. I knew it was highway-robbery, but I WANTED IT, by golly! Still have it and don't regret it.
    1 point
  46. @mtexter I wanted to follow up on this thread. Did you ever get any photos of the actual blades or learn anything further rom these? Thanks!
    1 point
  47. Does this add to the conversation ? Number 161752.
    1 point
  48. Nagoya wood handle Type 95 serial 201920 関 ,with blade fuller
    1 point
  49. A Fake Wooden Handle type 95 (1st variant with steel scabbard), the best one i've come across, actually probably the only one! It's a good one for you guys to find the red flags on. It would fool a lot of first time buyers with limited knowledge.
    1 point
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