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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/01/2021 in all areas

  1. I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity yesterday to meet with a long-time sword collector who is well-known within the Japanese sword collecting world. The man has been collecting for over 40 years, knows his stuff, and has solid connections within our hobby. I will refer to him as my "Mentor". He will be at the SF Token Kai next weekend and will have swords on display and for sale. As a newbie, who only began collecting this year, I am very grateful for the meeting as I gained so much information and greatly benefitted from this man's knowledge and expertise. I brought half my collection to him for evaluation and I'll say it was, indeed, a humbling experience. He provided me with a knowledgeable assessment of my swords - there was a fair amount of disappointment related to some of my purchases, but I also had an unknown gem among my swords (one of my swords has a 350 year-old blade and I was not aware of this until my mentor read the tang and consulted his Hawley book to confirm). The guy definitely has set me straight when it comes to collecting, and I'm now on a new course with my collecting goals. Glad I met with him before I got too far into this hobby! In addition to evaluating half of my collection, he showed me some of the swords in his collection. I was amazed and impressed! He had at least one Gassan Sadakazu sword and some from Minotagawa shrine smiths. He had high-class guntos and old, immaculate Nihonto from various sword periods. I was able to handle these swords and observe them close up. Attached are photos of a Minotagawa sword made by Masataka that was one of the swords that belonged to the Captain of the battleship Yamato that was sunk during the Battle of Okinawa in 1945 - obviously the captain did not have this particular sword with him at the time as he went down with the ship. So, it was a fantastic 3 hours I spent with my mentor and we'll be moving forward with him continuing do so sword evaluations for me and even some repairs (he's got years of experience and a workshop with all the tools). I'm very grateful for the experience!
    5 points
  2. Leave it as it is. No need to get any more aggressive with cleaning. The translation meaning will not change much. You have the location, the name of the smith (well, at least a partial name), and you know the rest of the inscription is a dedication to the person/family who comissioned the sword and their location, as well as the date of the manufacture (1842). That is really much more than many people know about their own swords. Regarding the partial name, we know it is Takenaka Kuni-somebody from Fuchū in Bingō province. As Kyle shows, there is a record of a Takenaka Kunihiko from Fuchū in Bingō working around the same time your sword is dated. He also used a few other aliases, including Kunisaki and Kunitora. This is almost certainly your guy. For some reason the last kanji of the name on your sword is not really corresponding with the known names he used. Plus, it is hard to make out, and doesn't really look like the kanji for hiko, tora, or saki. So, we have to decide if that last kanji is just a super fanciful way of writing one of his known names, or if it is a kanji representing a name that has gone unrecorded (that we can't yet decipher). In any event, knowing that last kanji of the name will not change the appraisal of your sword. And trying to clean up that last bit carries the risk of damaging your sword for absolutely no appreciable gain. As always, the sword itself is the thing that gives it its value, and that value will not change no matter if that last kanji turns out to be tora, saki, or hiko.
    4 points
  3. 備中國水田住大与五国重 - Bicchu no kuni Mizuta ju Oyogo Kunishige
    4 points
  4. I am not sure about the characters in red. 備後府中住竹中國虎- Bingo Fuchu ju Takenaka Kunitora 天保十三年▢月應▢▢守▢▢需 - Tenpo 13th year, ? month, responding to the order from "▢▢守▢▢" 作於江府本郷本藩丸山邸百........ - made at Maruyama-residence of this clan (Fukuyama-han) in Hongo of Edo
    3 points
  5. The reading for 備後府中住竹中國~ is ‘Bingo Fuchū-jū Takenaka Kuni~‘ On the right hand column, it’s dated 1842 [Tenpo 13] (天保十三年). After that appears to be ?雁??宗順君需 On the left begins with 作於江府本?本?香丸山邸百?? 
    2 points
  6. To start something… It begins with: “備後府中住(竹中?)國….”
    2 points
  7. 一心 (Ichishin) 谷川 慶治 - A Seki Kaji Tosho http://www.jp-sword.com/files/seki/gendaito.html
    2 points
  8. Kashu Iyetsugu Katana sue Koto Ubu signed and dated 66 cm with koshirae Two tests Side 1 - Miyai Rokubei - two body cut through the dodan. Dated 1650's Side 2 - Fujita Yoemon - Riokaruma , the most difficult cut through the hips . Dated 1650's
    2 points
  9. My first foray into a lone koshirae and fittings and went out on a limb purchasing a Wakizashi koshirae (no tsuba and some missing inlays) because honestly I like the look of it and do have a blade that would be a great upgrade for it if all the stars align to have it fit. A Google search didn't provide anything on Matsuyama Junin TOSHINOBU whom signed the koshirae. I also ended up getting a Kozuka lot (one will just be a shelf or inside drawer decoration) to work towards completing some Koshirae I already have I would classify these as "beginner" pieces, and you get what you pay for, but thought I'd share a humble little haul and of course always open to hear thoughts/feedback and if anyone knows the koshirae artist that would be amazing. *the photos got uploaded in a weird order but koshirae description is in between kozuka images.
    1 point
  10. Up for sale is a tanto by the third generation Owari Nobutaka, signed Zen Hakushu Nobutaka Nyudo. He was active in the Enpo period, 1673-1681. The blade has an old, high quality polish that shows off the activity in the ji nicely. Nagasa 27.6cm, kasane 5mm, motohaba 2.8cm. Very nice gold foil habaki. The Koshirae is late Edo period and all carved ebony. The various carvings depict early Chinese warriors and politicians including GuanYu and ZhangFei. The carvings are very well done. The kogai and kozuka are carved as part of the saya and not removable. There is a small makers mark near the jiri. There are no cracks or chips in the koshirae. The blade has a 1960 NBTHK Koshu Tokubetsu paper, as well as recent NTHK papers and worksheet. The koshirae also has NTHK papers and worksheet. Both the blade and koshirae received scores of 76 from NTHK. Does not include a shirasaya. Overall a very nice package. $5750 to your door in the US, includes PP fees and shipping. International shipping will be considerably more and we'll have to work out the details depending on destination. If you are interested send me a PM. Thanks, Wayne
    1 point
  11. Not sure about when or where he pick it up as he passed away many many years ago when I was a lot younger . Again the story of it being a bring back may have been just been what was thought of where it came from. It was amongst things they had kept after his passing . A type 14 nabu pistol & a Japanese flag along with the wrap the blade was wrapped in with a tie around it also a fan that has been broken threw the years
    1 point
  12. The cutting edge seems to be around 21 inches entire length of steel is 26 1/2
    1 point
  13. Thanks guys it’s a short sword I can get it measured if needed . I absolutely know nothing about it . Also my plan weren’t to touch it much I was just trying to get info on it . Maker , maybe some dating or even if it was someone’s personal sword or military of some kind . Not sure of value but it will probably stay with me for awhile since it was my grandfathers bring back from the story that came with it
    1 point
  14. Although reading kanji is not by any means my forte this looks to read Kane Mitsu. Corrections welcomed and will surely come along shortly. Which Kanemitsu made this sword needs to be determined. Images of the entire sword would be most helpful in making that determination and appreciated. Signatures (Mei) can be shoshin (genuine) or gimei (false). In general what is called a Shinsa can certify its validity and pinpoint the maker. The patina on the nakago (tang) hints that this sword is of some age and appears to be well cared for to this point in time, don't mess with it - carefully research proper Japanese sword care articles, there are many posted on this website.
    1 point
  15. In Nihonto collecting, I think there is nothing as valuable and encouraging as a true mentor. Lucky guy.
    1 point
  16. Thanks great topic about that tanto, very nice piece. Shin-sakuto are just not that populair, but one day also the modern swords will be old swords. We would wish to be able to see some koto swords in their prime, with modern sword we can.
    1 point
  17. Hi Bob, Reference Tsuba #83, Goto Tsujo I also have a ‘Goto Tsujo’ shippo tsuba(see pics) that I have posted previously. Mine came from the Albert Newall collection, a dealer whose collection had been in store for 30 years after his death. I have also found several other examples on the internet, so a popular design. The Ashmolean museum has one (Church Collection EAX.10899, shibuichi, misidentified as ‘Mitsunaga (probably not Tsujo)’. The Boston Museum of Fine Arts has another (11.5433,shibuichi) and one was up for sale at Bonhams, NY recently (24 Sep 2020, lot 966, brown patina but described as shakudo). Points of interest are: The colour of your pics appears to be shakudo (as you stated), but the other examples have a brown colouration (mostly based on photos) and appear to be shibuichi. The kanji and kao on the examples appear to differ in detail, so are some fakes, student works or just variations with time? I’m not expert enough to judge. I just take the view that any tsuba that I acquire with a famous signature is likely to be gimei and concentrate on the quality of the workmanship. Most people seem to read Goto Tsujo’s personal name as Mitsutoshi however references I have seen stated that Fukushi reads him as Mitsunobu and the Toso Kodogu Koza says that the kanji are commonly read as Mitsutoshi, but Goto documents list him as Mitsunobu with furigana reading aides by his name. One example I have seen listed has the signature as Goto Mitsutoshi (後藤光壽) and another as Goto Mitsunobu ((後藤光寿). As the little square at the bottom of the left side of ‘toshi’ appears on one tsuba, but not on the others, perhaps the artist used both names, changing the kanji. I believe that both forms of the kanji can be read as both ‘toshi’ and ‘nobu’. Japanese artisans were great at using different names; Tsujo was also known as Shirobei, Gennojo and Mitsuo according to Sesko. Stats of my tsuba: Height: 7.05 cm. Width: 6.65 cm. Thickness (rim): 0.35 cm. Weight: 152 g Best regards, John Hi Bob, the titles on my pics for your tsuba #83 do not seems to have copied over. They are: 1. My tsuba 2. My signature. 3. Boston, 4 Boston signature. 5. Church Collection. 6. Bonhams .
    1 point
  18. From the shape: Nanbokucho, Momoyama or Shinshinto. Now elimination begins: From the Boshi: Ichimai with long kaeri. Koto: Go/Sa school. Momoyama: Yasutsugu, Horikawa school, Shinkai. Hamon: angular (box-like) choji in nioi-deki with profuse tobiyaki, long ashi. No direct koto hit. Hadori is a little hard and follows a notare pattern while the work is executed with angular ups and down. Hada: standing out itame with nie and chikei. Soshu vibe to it. The combination of the boshi stucture, jihada and choji doesn't fit neatly in any obvious Koto box. The work feels one level above shinshinto. Condition: There is either a slight machi-okuri, or none at all. This points to a sword made with nanbokucho sugata in later period length. It is probably ubu, with a second mekugi ana added either to fit a new koshirae or done at the same time the signature was erased to appear koto. Near the Nakago, the hamon begins in a shinto-like fashion. All of this leads me to a Momoyama period smith. Out of these, The Horikawa and Yasutsugu school were some of the most prolific. They have some work compatible with the shape of the boshi, hada and box-like choji. There is a certain koto renaissance inspiration to the work with mix-and-match of the five gokaden. The sword is well executed with a lot of jinie and active hamon which feels slighlty contrived, something with you often see in these koto revival work. This brings me far from my area of focus, but I'll bite: Idea 1: Iga no Kami Kinmichi Idea 2: Yasutsugu
    1 point
  19. Kuniie - Yoshihara Soji is the older brother Another blade he made https://www.toukenkomachi.com/index_en_tachi&katana_A090818.html He is also the swordsmith in the "The last Samurai" movie. I dont know much about Seto Yoshihiro but i read that thread yesterday For the price i think the year when he became a mukansa wont mean much, some (dealers?) say they put more effort in the blades for the contests to become mukansa.
    1 point
  20. is it possible the saya was repainted, maybe by a vet bringing it back? It seems there is paint on the fittings and that seems wrong if it was painted then assembled as it would have been in Japan
    1 point
  21. Moriyama san, I thought the second character of the smith’s name had the radical 乇 or 宅 on the right. However, when I was searching for smiths with the surname 竹中 I also found Hikokuni. As he previously used a couple of aliases beginning with ‘Kuni’, is listed as being active two years after the date of this sword, and was active in Bingo, I assumed it was the same smith, but with a different alias - perhaps 國託/詫/托
    1 point
  22. New burner bids: 36 actual price: 304 EUR remaining time: 13 days Samurai Katana Schwert mit Damastklinge - eGun
    1 point
  23. While I knew that the logo of Mitsubishi had a deep historical footprint in Daimyo history as a Kamon. Little did I know that the Mercedes-Benz was once a Daimyo clan. It all comes together now Jokes aside it's looks to me like an honest Edo period koshirae with a consistent and well executed formal theme.
    1 point
  24. British Hi Fi systems, (they sound better), and old vinyl records, (analog recordings if possible).
    1 point
  25. Good buy, interesting little bohi, good enough condition to appreciate. Does look muromachi. Interesting that the tsuba was black and the raising looks colored if that's not just aged grime. If I had seen that it's one I would have taken a stab at.
    1 point
  26. This is one of my problems....I collect a lot of things. Original comic book art (https://www.comicartfans.com/galleryroom.asp?gsub=200036), old paperback book original art, Mark Twain 1st editions (I don't go for pure 1st printings as they get too pricey and they are the same books...just not the first off the press), bronze statues, antique political cartoon art, antique lithographs, other random 1st editions of books I enjoy, Uncle Sam art, Lady Justice art, Mark Twain/Lincoln busts and any bust by Robert Berks, certain graphic novels, Weird one but statues or medical models involving hands or eyes, scrimshaw but I've only come across one piece I felt was actual art rather than touristy, some folk art, antiques regarding John Law the Scottish financiers and gambler from the late 1700s, don't know why but Napolean III coins and really old theater tokens, Don Quixote statues and books, used to collect and still have lots of old video games but those got expensive so I moved on at least 12 years ago....there's more and I might start collecting something new tomorrow for all I know.
    1 point
  27. Thank you, I know very little myself especially about pre WW2. This one seemed strange to me because it was so curved. I actually didn't know it was signed until the day after I bought it. The handle was very hard to remove as it had rusted into the wood.
    1 point
  28. Yes, still have mine, a wakizashi that I bought in the mid '80s. I think I described in an earlier thread how I accidentally smuggled it out of Japan in my suitcase without realizing it has to be surrendered to the police and de-licensed.
    1 point
  29. Thanks for the advice Jussi, all good learning material for me! With all my collecting experiences (current and past), I find that research is a great way of enjoying the subject without having to spend money!
    1 point
  30. In keeping with abstract tsuba... Best, rkg (Richard George)
    1 point
  31. Sorry Bruce, no truthful story in that really.... I can still give a 'high five' (with each hand 😊). Your words "and you can feel, as you slide an oiling cloth or paper towel along the blade" very much reminded me of what goes through my head every time I carry out that manoeuvre when cleaning/oiling my sharper blades. A clean swipe from habaki to kissaki has that sobering effect on me. Many years ago when I first developed an interest WW2 swords (c2018 😂) I remember reading an article wherein the author said something along the lines of ...'if your intending to collect Japanese swords then at some point they will cut you'. Too true in my case and in fact have done that twice. Not serious in any respect and definitely not due to tomfoolery or inebriation but simple over familiarity (is that the same as neglect?). Something strangly spiritual about being cut by a Teruhide or is it simply the result of a lack of concentration? But thanks for your concern although the actual loss of 4 digits would have made for a much grander Teruhide encounter. All the best Rob PS ....Maybe a new thread could be started, reading something along the lines of a butchers sandwich board...... "Best Cuts this Week" 😂
    1 point
  32. Inherited mine when my dad passed on, so yes. 1941 Mantetsu Koa Isshin. It will stay in the family if I get my wishes about it.
    1 point
  33. No - my first was a decent shinto wakizashi by Echizen Shigetaka Moved it on to continue the nihonto journey. Was very inspired by Jean's Gokaden collection which I am now trying to accumulate (very slowly)
    1 point
  34. No, I sold it years ago to upgrade my collection. In almost 40 years of Nihonto collecting, I get rid thrice of my collection to upgrade it to finish by:
    1 point
  35. I was a sucker for military sake cups some years back. had close to 300 at one point but moved them all on. but the bug has bitten again with jsut a few. my weakness is russo war, and hiroshima
    1 point
  36. Well received into the U.S. Alex...quickly and nicely packed. Thanks again. Everything looks better in hand. Best regards, Ben
    1 point
  37. 1 point
  38. Like the Yagyu display so many years ago or seeing all those Kaneiye in person at the DTI in 2014, this sounds such a rare opportunity that I looked into plane flights same day in and out just to attend. Prices, times, and layovers proved a bridge too far, but I am still looking into any last minute deals that can remotely line up with my work schedule. The AB-NBTHK Yagyu publication doesn't convey half the value of seeing the Yagyu display in person. I've seen a few of the Nagatsune belonging to one of the exhibitors and really encourage people to attend. For my own sake, I hope this display can come to an East Coast function some day or recur. I regret it wasn't announced earlier, as missing it is certainly my educational loss in the shadow of some great pieces being displayed. Three of the best fittings collectors in the USA trotting out some of the best stuff.... bite my tongue if I miss it. Edit: I just saw Barry's post below. Another reason to attend. One of the most beautiful swords I've ever seen was a TokuJuyo (Yamato) Hosho on display at SF about 18 or 19 years ago. Knock your socks off Instant KO. I've long hoped to see that one again some day.
    1 point
  39. I came across this one in a book, it just strikes me as powerful with the imagery and motion depicted:
    1 point
  40. For Arnold’s (and everyone’s) sake, instead of just saying “it’s an obvious fake, hit the books,” can we please list some things that helped you identify it as a fake? Not all, but here’s what I saw right away: 1. Kanji on the mei was too spread out, on both sides, funkily chiseled (if it even WAS chiseled), and not normally recognizable characters (katakana?) 2. Thought the erotic scene on the kozuka was very out of place, and the figures themselves were too crude. 3. Kogatana’s blade shape was odd; the sori looked almost fantasy-like with the carved-out area. 4. Rust on nakago was an odd color, too bright. 5. Loose/missing seppas 6. seemed like the habaki and blade were off-center through the tsuba There are others certainly, but I think it’s helpful to take an extra few seconds to point out the WHY instead of always pointing towards the books without further context.
    1 point
  41. Bob looks like a great find.....! would be nice to know more about it... good luck!
    1 point
  42. Item No.36 A Kozuka in pale shibuichi , with copper and shakudo , gold and silver details and inlays. Subject of an otter with a captured catfish , next to a stream with bank and sluice gate ( ? ) . Signed - Kikugawa Mitsuyuki saku - school ? Ex : H. Seymour Trower collection Ex : H. G. Beasley collection Ex : Naunton collection - this is claimed by Sothebys when the piece was auctioned in the early 1980's - I cannot find it in the Joly book of the collection . Is there another book / part to the Naunton collection or were Sothebys misinformed ? The otter and other detailing finely carved. The shibuichi has strong ' tiger ' striping when viewed in the right light - I have taken a few pictures at different angles to try and show this. Is this an encouragement to the values of persistance bringing their own rewards , as the catfish is notoriously slippery and difficult to hang on to ?
    1 point
  43. sorry writing error not 2 students, thank God only one!
    0 points
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