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  1. Kashu Iyetsugu Katana sue Koto Ubu signed and dated 66 cm with koshirae Two tests Side 1 - Miyai Rokubei - two body cut through the dodan. Dated 1650's Side 2 - Fujita Yoemon - Riokaruma , the most difficult cut through the hips . Dated 1650's
    4 points
  2. As far as swords go, no I don’t have my first purchase. I went into this blindly with one little book and a solid belief in fellow collectors and the “ it’s a Vet bring back bought directly from the family” . I was so proud of my first purchase of a Japanese sword that you couldn’t get the smile off my face, that was until I found out from a true collector and now friend and mentor that my Prized Sword was a Chinese Fake😒. It took me a year to get my money back from the seller but finally did. After a couple years of reading and a lot of help from this forum and my now Two mentors I have a modest collection of REAL Japanese Nihonto. Thank you to all here that have helped me with this journey and allowed me to become the care taker of some of your prized pieces. A little side note I do still have the first K98 Mauser that I brought home on my bicycle 58 years ago. MikeR
    4 points
  3. No, I sold it years ago to upgrade my collection. In almost 40 years of Nihonto collecting, I get rid thrice of my collection to upgrade it to finish by:
    3 points
  4. Nice going Gwyn! I do hold my manhood cheap for dropping out of Shotokan karate as a lowly 1st kyu in the mid 1990s but, as usual, life and work got in the way. It's great to hear from some of the serious martial artists on here swinging swords and pounding boards in their 60s and 70s. Sorry for the hijack. I don't have my first sword but don't regret not having it. I like my swords but wouldn't be unhappy to part with them. I do, however, have some fittings that really speak to me and they would be one hell of a wrench to let go.
    3 points
  5. I do not. Echizen Kanemasa, nice sword, but was time to move on. An NMB member now has it, or did a while ago.
    3 points
  6. Yes, I can't imagine selling it either. It is a humble reminder of how simply this diabolically expensive obsession can start.
    3 points
  7. I was a sucker for military sake cups some years back. had close to 300 at one point but moved them all on. but the bug has bitten again with jsut a few. my weakness is russo war, and hiroshima
    3 points
  8. Me also Barry, I got my Shodan in 1981 and like you felt that I needed a Nihonto. A friend of my brother got me this little beauty. Then I like you started on the "LONG JOURNEY TO NIHONTO". Made the mistake then of going down the Chinato path, But luchily over time I was educated and got rid of them all and now only have a few decent Nihonto and Iaito. To date I am now a Godan in Shotokan and a Dan Grade in MJER and still training every week and practising at 66yrs old. What was your grade in ?
    3 points
  9. I do, too. An osuriage naginata with a VERY nice tsuka that I bought from Andy Quirt in, - are you sitting down? - 1965. Peter
    3 points
  10. I would guess it reads - 文政十一年仲春 - Bunsei 11th year (1828) mid spring (I am bit uncertain of my translation of this end)
    2 points
  11. In keeping with abstract tsuba... Best, rkg (Richard George)
    2 points
  12. Inherited mine when my dad passed on, so yes. 1941 Mantetsu Koa Isshin. It will stay in the family if I get my wishes about it.
    2 points
  13. No - my first was a decent shinto wakizashi by Echizen Shigetaka Moved it on to continue the nihonto journey. Was very inspired by Jean's Gokaden collection which I am now trying to accumulate (very slowly)
    2 points
  14. Sold and upgraded along the way. Same rule here: buy one, sell one, keep the count low and the quality high. Tastes evolve over time, and what was once interesting turns less interesting as one's tastes matures and learns more along the journey.
    2 points
  15. Hi Glen Kobushi-gata = fist shaped and Kawari-gata = irregular shape. So I would say if it is not fist shaped (kobushi gata) then it is kawari gata My tsuba example of a kobushi gata shape
    2 points
  16. I've cropped and enhanced your shots a little. Still would be great to see some clear photos when you get a chance, especially the serial number. You can read about these on the following sites: http://ohmura-study.net/957.html https://www.warrelics.eu/forum/Japanese-militaria/short-development-history-type-95-gunto-676112/ https://www.warrelics.eu/forum/Japanese-militaria/ija-type-95-nco-sword-info-228172/
    2 points
  17. Still have my first mumei kanbun shinto 27.5" nagasa in early type 98 higher end gunto fittings with rust damage on the top 3" of the blade. Has a name carved onto the tsuba. I will always love her. Its got an amazing blue hue to it's metal and carries its flaws decently well. But that's me looking at it with a "parents" eye. I will keep it as long as I collect nihonto. Got to the point now where, kind of like Gakusee, I will probably make a rule to sell one if I buy one. Will make for some tough choices down the line.
    2 points
  18. No, I do not. This is not counting the Chinese replica wall hanger which I bought as a student and is still in my dad’s flat. As as regards genuine nihonto, in fact I have sold the first four blades I acquired in order to upgrade my collection. My goal is to own not more than 10 swords and even that is probably too many. So I try to not become emotionally attached to blades or objects which are not of strong familial sentimental value.
    2 points
  19. I still have my first sword, bought in 1976. I thought at the time that every blackbelt needed a sword. Who knew that it would start me on this long journey.
    2 points
  20. Indeed I do! Bought from Tim Pepins father back in 1980 something... -t
    2 points
  21. Echizen Kinai Seashells 71 x 71mm SOLD Signed ‘Echizen ju Kinai saku’ (越前住記内作) with ura mei (on the reverse). The signature and workmanship is indicative of Nanadai Takahashi (7th Gen.) the last generation of the Kinai tsubako. Nanadai Takahashi is known to have produced smaller tsuba and also had a unique mei. The ‘nai’ (内) of Kinai is written as ‘iri’ (入), and his ‘saku’ (作) is referred to as ‘umbrella saku’ because is carved with an extra stroke, giving the apperance of an umbrella (人). He was born in 1818 and was known as ‘Meijin Kinai’ (名人記内) meaning ‘master’ or ‘expert’, based on the quality of his work. Abundant ‘tekkotsu’ forging lines around the rim show this tsuba was well forged.
    1 point
  22. At the San Francisco show coming up will be a OUTSTANDING display for study put on by the NBTHK-AB of Ichijo and Nagatsune fittings it will be the best display ever put on in the USA of there works I believe all of the Nagatsune are in his sketch book and the most of the Ichijo in the original boxes from Ichijo when he made them for the original buyer If you are a Kodogu person or just want to see the best of the best, come the the show and see the display as a grouping like this will not be put together again !!!!!! Fred Geyer
    1 point
  23. Just bought this at a estate auction of a guy who collected militaria. Took a chance and drove 12hrs/800 miles and paid off. Was hoping for NO competition and the locals thought it a common gunto. Anyway, as you can see the blade is dated May 1941 and has to be one of the earliest if not THE earliest sword known forged by Michimasa at the shrine forge. If anyone has seen or knows of a earlier dated blade let me know. Below is the or "my" translation but the family name (Kudo?) may be wrong as am not familiar with this name. Obviously this blade was made for this Haruhito and he probably was a Army Ofc as it comes in Army mounts w/matt rust colored lacquered saya. This is MASATADA's original name and has to be the first or one of the first blades made at the forge. I found a similar shrine sword by Michimasa that rec'd Hozon papers and it is dated July 1941. Neither that sword nor mine have the kikusui on the nakago but kikusui emblem is engraved on both sides of the habaki. Blade is in decent polish with no nicks no problems other than few minor scratches and blems which would easily polish out but I'm too f'n old and not sending this to Japan for polish - too easy to pass it on w/o a new polish. Let me know if a earlier dated blade is known - thanks. hamon is a kind of lazy gunome with profuse nie and short ashi. blade length is 26 1/4 " or 67.7cm tom w OMOTE; 昭和 十六年五月吉日 SHOWA 16 NEN 5 GATSU KICHIJITSU (MAY 1941 AUSPICIOUS DAY) 於 湊川 神社 村上道政作 OITE MINATOGAWA JINJA MURAKAMI MICHIMASA SAKU "MICHIMASA MURAKAMI MADE THIS AT THE MINATOGAWA SHRINE" URA; 謹呈 エ藤 治人博士 御左右 菊水 鍛刀會 KINTEI KUDO?,HARUHITO HAKASE GOSOU KIKUSUI TANTOKAI (PRESENTATION TO THE HONORABLE MR HARUHITO KUDO KIKUSUI ORDERED SWORD FORGING ASSOCIATION ) tsuba , all 6 seppa and fuchi marked; ー目
    1 point
  24. Hi Everyone! I have a nice example of a superbly crafted gendaito by the smith who goes by the name of Ishido Teruhide. He also uses the mei Ishido Mitsunobu and is a descendant (10th generation and last) of the famous Ishido korekazu lineage. This piece has a sayagaki done by Dr Kanzan. "鞘書 : 石堂輝秀作 刃長貳尺貳寸壹分有之 昭和癸丑年初春吉日 寒山誌(花押)" At early spring of Shôwa 48(1973), Dr. SATÔ Kanzan had appreciated this sword. Details about this sword, Nagasa 67cm Sori 0.9cm Motohaba 3.31cm Sakihaba 2.23cm Motokasane 0.64cm Sakikasane 0.45cm One Mekugi-ana Blade Weight about 800g Ko-kissaki Gunome Choji Midare Hamon Nioi deki with Ashi Jigane is Ko-mokume hada, rich with jinie Ubu nakago with strong ubu-ba remaining. Likely to be unpolished from its first polish. A fresh polish by a good polisher will definitely do this sword justice. However, due to the lack of budget I wasn't able to when I first acquire this from Japan. Ishido Teruhide was known for his incredible sharpness for his woodworking tools (planes), thus it is likely that his swords possess the same level of craftmanship and quality. Do PM me for more details if needed. More photos to be uploaded. Apologies as I need to compress some of them to meet the requirements. This sword is for sale @ US$5,000 shipped. Note that due to the laws in my country, I'm not able to do any returns. Please make sure you're aware of this before committing with payment. Regards, Benjamin
    1 point
  25. Just out of curiosity, how many of you still own the first sword that you ever acquired? I still have the first gunto that I bought, and I really can't see myself selling the first nihonto that I bought. My mind might change later, but I really enjoy just holding it in my hands and studying it. It certainly didn't cost a fortune, and is only has hozon papers, but I think it is a beautiful piece. I look forward to acquiring higher quality blades in the future, but short of winning the lottery, I don't think I will ever have a juyo blade in my collection.
    1 point
  26. Wow Jussi ...I just checked and that date is right on for the maker and the time period plus the school. You have helped so much and you are very knowledgeable. You put that together so fast. The date you found works with the rest of the blade and maker. Thanks so much again Jussi for being so kind. Yours truly Steven
    1 point
  27. Wow great looking swords with great pictures. Can’t explain the what ink are the extremely low prices. I hope someone can explain it. MikeR
    1 point
  28. 短刀掛台 Try that Stephen.
    1 point
  29. Like Barry and some others I had set getting shodan in Kendo as the point I would save till to get my first. Life events and such dragged that process out about 10 years so I had plenty of time to save up and learn a bit. My first nihonto was an o-wakizashi signed Dewa Daijo Fujiwara Kunimichi, and assessed to be one of his later works, or the 2nd gen depending on which theory you go by. Have learned a lot more since then, not sure if I'll ever trade it up yet. Most of my other pieces and interests have been much older koto and in my range ones just attributed to broad schools, and it's been nice to have a signed piece and be able to research a smith who has a little bit more of his life documented or written about in various journals. I need to get some of my own photos, this one has been tricky to capture appropriately.
    1 point
  30. If 'sword' means Tachi or Katana, then sadly no, but I am grateful for what she taught me.
    1 point
  31. Clouds over a village...
    1 point
  32. It's a "Pineapple sword"!
    1 point
  33. I do and I won't let go (unless I get a ridiculous offer haha) - Shodai Tadayoshi o tanto made for Nabeshima Naoshige. https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/20503/lot/1186/ 😇 John
    1 point
  34. Stolen from the internet - probably a repeat here...
    1 point
  35. Oh yes! An accidental arrival but it is a Mino den katana/tachi with an iron tsuba, clearly battle damaged in WWII and mounted as a Burmese dha. Worth almost nothing but can't ever let it go. It started me on a journey of discovery for which I will always be grateful. All the best.
    1 point
  36. It's not saying much, since I acquired my first two blades this year, but I still have them. Again, not that it counts for much as I'm at the beginning of my journey, but I don't see myself letting them go in the future.
    1 point
  37. didn't realize the Image i posted was of such poor quality... here's a better version (hopefully)
    1 point
  38. Like the Yagyu display so many years ago or seeing all those Kaneiye in person at the DTI in 2014, this sounds such a rare opportunity that I looked into plane flights same day in and out just to attend. Prices, times, and layovers proved a bridge too far, but I am still looking into any last minute deals that can remotely line up with my work schedule. The AB-NBTHK Yagyu publication doesn't convey half the value of seeing the Yagyu display in person. I've seen a few of the Nagatsune belonging to one of the exhibitors and really encourage people to attend. For my own sake, I hope this display can come to an East Coast function some day or recur. I regret it wasn't announced earlier, as missing it is certainly my educational loss in the shadow of some great pieces being displayed. Three of the best fittings collectors in the USA trotting out some of the best stuff.... bite my tongue if I miss it. Edit: I just saw Barry's post below. Another reason to attend. One of the most beautiful swords I've ever seen was a TokuJuyo (Yamato) Hosho on display at SF about 18 or 19 years ago. Knock your socks off Instant KO. I've long hoped to see that one again some day.
    1 point
  39. They were certainly rushed. My late-95 doesn't have a bohi (takes time to make) and you can feel, as you slide an oiling cloth or paper towel along the blade, 3 stages of tapering in the blade body- widest, middle, and thinnest. There is a noticeable "line" for lack of words, where the tapering shifts. You can't see it, but I can feel it. Yet it's a solid weapon, heavier than the early 95s and a good looking blade.
    1 point
  40. Received Kinai-tsuba today. Lovely tsuba. Thank you Kyle.
    1 point
  41. The swords have just been cleaned, thanks for the reporting.
    1 point
  42. I have been to the Museum many times, this is the first time I see this happening. I proceeded to report it to the Director of the Museum who immediately went to check. In addition, those blades are only touched with gloves, so I think they may be "fingerprints of fabric ".
    1 point
  43. Schedule of events - just posted 2021 TOKEN KAI SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FRIDAY AUGUST 6 8:00 A.M.-12:00 P.M. Dealer Set-up Ballroom F-J 12:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. Public Show Hours Ballroom F-J 6:00 P.M.-8:00 P.M. Cocktail Reception Foyer F SATURDAY AUGUST 7 9:00 A.M.-10:00 P.M. Show Hours Ballroom F-J 10:00 AM-11:00 P.M. JSSUS Etiquette Lecture Ballroom C-D 11:00 A.M.11:30 A.M. NBTHKAB Board Meeting. Ballroom C-D 1:00 P.M.-3:00 P.M. NBTHKAB Display/Forum Ballroom C-D 6:00 P.M.-8:00 P.M. Cocktail/Dinner Reception* Foyer F SUNDAY AUGUST 8 9:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M. Show Hours Ballroom F-J 4:00 P.M. Show Closes Thank you *This event is for Exhibitors only.
    1 point
  44. 11. I propped a few cases up on the left wall to examine the lighting. I noticed a few things and am now debating moving the lights back for a wider field. For one, the lights are only hitting the bottom portion of the stands. I could of course just place the koshirae on top with the blades on the bottom, but the bottom most blade would not be in optimal lighting. Again, please ignore the quality of the photos at this stage. Either way, here is a preview. Would love to hear your thoughts!
    1 point
  45. Not spamming when posting swords - most any sword is a pleasure to look at... -t
    1 point
  46. Michael - The lectures are always on Saturday, so youre in luck. I believe the NBTHK will charge a fee for non-members to attend as they have in the past. I will post the schedule of all the events once I have it. -tch
    1 point
  47. About 7/8 years ago, i said on the board I was going to sell my Nihonto collection and upgrade it to gather a Gokaden one. At least achieved, Here it is from top to bottom: - Bizen Den: ubu nijimei beginning of Oei Yasumitsu, early Kamakura sugata, suguha - Soshu Den: Tametsugu, son of Go Yoshihiro and Norishige Student - Mino Den: Naoe Shizu - Yamato Den : according Honma Junji/Tanobe sensei: Hosho, according to NBTHK, Tegai Kanekiyo, son of Kanenaga - Yamashiro : Ryokai
    1 point
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