Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/28/2021 in Posts

  1. If I may, I'd like to suggest a change in approach. Those of us who could easily see the sword as a fake were able to do so, not because we have memorized a list of rules (the kanji shouldn't be too spread out, for example), but rather, because we have looked at so many of the real thing. Once you set a rule that says no real Nihonto have wide spread kanji in their mei, some sword will pop up with atypical spacing and prove you wrong. However, once you have looked closely at 1,000 true Nihonto, either in hand or in a good book, you will never be fooled by a sword like the one up top. Study Grasshopper. Grey
    4 points
  2. Re Item No.86 Some photos of the box as featured . This is made from over 1000 year old Japanese Cedar and still has the classic cedar fragrance. I understand that trees of this sort of age are classified in a similar way to ancient monuments. It is illegal to use any wood from them unless it is as a result of storm loss or natural death. This means that the wood is greatly sought after...
    3 points
  3. How about BB cards? 😂
    3 points
  4. I'm new to collecting. Began collecting WW2-era vintage pistols last year, and began Gunto collecting this year. I still add to my pistol collection, but the Gunto collecting has consumed me this year. Parts of my collections are pictured in the photos below. Always had an interest in WW2 since I was a kid (Grandpa served in the war - U.S. Army, ETO), but, as stated, just recently got into collecting. I'm learning these are expensive hobbies. Lol
    3 points
  5. As to the the blades themselves, someone whispered that we (from outside the prefecture) were invited ‘staff’ and not participants per se. For this reason we were not entering slips with attributions. The long blade in first position was a Nagamitsu, and later in the car I was asked if I remembered it from a viewing late last year. Some of our members seem to have photographic memories! A problematic blade was a lovely Katsumitsu with Kin Zōgan Mei that few were able to guess correctly. But the real trick was blades four and five. As different as two blades could be, they were both actually by Inoué Shinkai of Ōsaka. “Most people got one or the other, but no-one got both!” said the commentator. One blade was a ‘young’ example by Izumi no Kami Kunisada, three years before he took the name Shinkai. The Tanto in fifth position from towards the end of his life, looked nothing special to me, just a straight suguha, and I put it down rather quickly after a perfunctory examination. But in my mind it stayed bright and shining; mentally I could not put it down. Like purest cream, or butterscotch, the jihada and smooth hamon line continued to call me, blotting out all else.
    3 points
  6. Copying shamelessly the spirit and style of Guido's report on the tomb of Masamune, I thought a quick description of Sunday's NBTHK meeting might keep the wolf from the door a while longer. Sunday, 25 July 2021. We drove a couple of hours to Minatogawa Jinja in Kobe for the Hyogo NBTHK branch meeting, carrying some serious blades to test their abilities. (Sadly the lunch, being a quick Japanese affair at a greasy spoon nearby could not compare, though.) During a lull in the sword appreciation proceedings, I took a quick stroll around the precincts for some photos of the atmosphere. There were visitors here and there in small numbers, but my impression was that they had come to pray, not as tourists. Although a brilliant military strategist and special hero in Japanese history, 'Kusunoki Ko' 楠公 1294- 1336(?)was elevated to higher status in the Meiji Period. There is a movement afoot today to persuade NHK to do a year-long 'Taiga Drama' on his life. As you will see in the photo below I signed a voting slip and popped it into the box. Photos of the tomb and the larger shrine area from my phone will follow. For those of you who have already visited the shrine in Kobe, this will be old hat. Please feel free to add your own photos, perpective, understandings, etc.
    2 points
  7. Additional pictures. Very keen to learn on what the signature on this one reads!
    2 points
  8. Item No. 86 - Set for Daisho pair in mixed metals Related themes on a recently mounted set of fittings by Ford Hallam These were made approx 18years ago as a commission for a U.K. collector and show themes or associated subjects such as tiger and bamboo , dragon and rain ,the chinese ' four gentlemen ' , autumn leaves etc. I will post some additional views of the fittings seperately , also of the box.
    2 points
  9. 忠義 Chūgi Introductory video here shows some of the swords and armour on display in their museum.
    2 points
  10. Yesterday, 03 / 07 / 2021, an event was held in Birmingham, the real one not the US copy, where Nihonto enthusiasts from all over the UK met for the first time after so many months of virus enforced separation. Special thanks must go to Ian Chapman and Mike Hickson - Smith for all their hard work in initiating the event, sourcing a venue and finally bringing the plan to its successful fruition. Unfortunately covid restrictions imposed limits on the number of attendees that could be accommodated in the space, but nevertheless if gave those sword lovers who could attended a foretaste of happier and less restrictive times that undoubtedly lie ahead. On display were a wide selection of fine swords, blades, fittings and accessories, some of which were old friends, but so many were new to me. Sadly I was unable to remain for the continuing festivities, that revolved around an evening meal, and something I find unbelievable, more liquid nourishment, but my few hours of exposure to the items on display and perhaps more importantly the opportunity to meet up with old friends, reignited a passion that this dreadful era of isolation had blunted. One again my thanks to Mike and Ian and let us look forward to making events like this a permanent feature in the future. Ian Bottomley
    1 point
  11. My fascination with Japanese military stuff doesn't not stop at edged weapons. I have uniforms, flags, banners, documents, sake cups, hats, caps, belts etc. Japanese WW2 medals are especially beautiful and interesting. Including those sent to families of troops killed in action. Here are a few to enjoy.
    1 point
  12. A friend of mine who also collects firearms as I do (and where I know him from) once told me that he inherited a few blades from his father who had a huge passion for Nihonto. He promised me to one day show me those blades. Due to COVID and him living further away from my home it took us some time to finally find a possible date. While he in advance told me he would rather not want me to take them apart we then agreed that we'll look at in person and see if they are easily disassembleable and then decide if they can be taken apart. I told him I'd do a lot of pictures and hopefully find others who will help me to learn as much as possible on his blades to pass back the information to him for him to keep it with the blades (since they are from his father he wants to keep them and not sell). In place I was amazed to learn there were a total of 6 blades that he had. Of those six he obtained five prior to WWII and one post WWII. Since he lived in Vienna and due to him having studied medicine it allowed him to stay in Vienna and care for the wounded (as far as I understood). Due to frequent bombings in which his collection once nearly was destroyed he rented a small storage inside St. Stephan Cathedral in Vienna where he managed to safely store the blades during WWII. Anyway, to get to the blades - I'll be posting them in exactly the order I took the pictures. This means I'll be starting with the blade he obtained post WWII which quite obvious is a blade in military mounting, so a WWII blade. I know this is the incorrect forum, but to keep all threads in the same section (at this point: I had considered posting all blades in a single thread, but due to the larger number of the blades I think this would probably be confusing so I will post individual threads for each blade) I'm nevertheless posting it here.
    1 point
  13. Stephen, I've heard that the value of Baseball cards has skyrocketed since last year, and that they've increased in value more than any other category of collectible.
    1 point
  14. Nice! but I just found a stash of old postage stamps and was looking for a collector... -t
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. there's no way that's battle damage...
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. It’s this agemaki no kanamono. I saw pictures of the armor, the kanamono are the same style. And yes, this one is missing on the armor.
    1 point
  19. Thanks for the interesting recollections and reflections of how it went. It allows us to almost feel the atmosphere and vicariously be present there through you
    1 point
  20. Last few pictures I have of this blade.
    1 point
  21. A (spare?) tsuba was sometimes used as a Netsuke, i.e. it could anchor anything you might want to hang from your obi. The holes were useful that way. Recently offered at auction I found a tsuba in an old drawer of bits and bobs. It had a braided string tied in a complicated series of knots encompassing the nakago and both hitsu ana, hiding the surface features. No-one really bothered to bid. I won, took it home and removed the hardened stringing. Not a bad tsuba underneath, iron, takabori design, and fairly large! "Used, but never abused." 8.5 x 8.0 cm
    1 point
  22. Hey guys, FYI, I didn't buy this particular sword from Marco - I bought a different sword from him. So, this "Yoshifusa" Rinji Seishiki should still be available. It was a pleasure doing business with Marco!
    1 point
  23. Quite something Piers, thanks for sharing your experience. here the armor i was referring to. I seems to have a piece of it in my collection
    1 point
  24. I have had similar experiences - since I'm much taller than most Japanese, I learned to start looking at shape, Hamon and Utsuri when I was two or three back so I could focus on hada when I got the blade in hand. A great experience man, envy you the journey... -t
    1 point
  25. till hell freezes over, they like moving there non-desired items into western direction while making good money. just because they dont think highly of there things, dosnt make them ignorant of the western values of them
    1 point
  26. Not a problem...wishing you the best with your sale. Nice blade at a nice price.
    1 point
  27. Thank you for posting the characters for his first name. I was having a hard time deciphering the first character in his given name and thought it could be 葚. Upon closer examination, it is indeed 甚. His full name is 井上・甚作 Inoue Jinsaku and his address in 1937 was 天田郡西中筋村石原八八 [Amata-gun Nishinakasuji-mura Ishihara 88]. He had two apprentices and could produce five swords per month.
    1 point
  28. Kai, welcome to the NMB forum! Congratulation to your first purchase of what looks like Japanese art, but what may be a cast copy of a TSUBA. More close-up photos and different angles would help to solidify my guess.
    1 point
  29. For Arnold’s (and everyone’s) sake, instead of just saying “it’s an obvious fake, hit the books,” can we please list some things that helped you identify it as a fake? Not all, but here’s what I saw right away: 1. Kanji on the mei was too spread out, on both sides, funkily chiseled (if it even WAS chiseled), and not normally recognizable characters (katakana?) 2. Thought the erotic scene on the kozuka was very out of place, and the figures themselves were too crude. 3. Kogatana’s blade shape was odd; the sori looked almost fantasy-like with the carved-out area. 4. Rust on nakago was an odd color, too bright. 5. Loose/missing seppas 6. seemed like the habaki and blade were off-center through the tsuba There are others certainly, but I think it’s helpful to take an extra few seconds to point out the WHY instead of always pointing towards the books without further context.
    1 point
  30. Hi Arnold, You say you want to buy an original sword; if so, you need to buy only from a dealer you can trust 100% or you need to study first (and, shy of getting lucky, those are the only options you have). The fact that you are asking about such an obvious fake tells us you are a beginner. There is nothing wrong with that; we all have been there ourselves, but as a beginner you need either very good advise or a whole lot more knowledge than you currently possess. Otherwise you will run out of money quite quickly. Grey
    1 point
  31. Full payment in advance would be standard. A payment plan should only be considered if the member has a long history with lots of references.
    1 point
  32. Thanks guys, Here is the other side. Cheers, Bryce
    1 point
  33. I have mentioned this before and it is my belief that modern trained polishers togishi do not emphasise the sharpness as much as the cosmetics of the blade. Old field polishes were 'in the white' and very sharp. The Edo peace changed what was more desirable in viewing than hewing. John
    1 point
  34. Where is the "Show us your Low-class Gunto" thread? That could be interesting! Lol
    1 point
  35. Yes, the crocodile skin is quite thick and adds a fair amount of bulk compared to a normal leather cover.
    1 point
  36. Zo Dai Nippon Gunma Ken Tomioka Shone Dan Gift to tomioka Boy scouts in Gunma Prefecture of imperial Japan Kozuke Junin Ryuminsay Kanetomo Rare prenstation Tanto long thick flawless wonderful crafted *more interesting Gendai to inscriptions coming soon*
    1 point
  37. Jim, agree! My polished NOBUFUSA is a also go-to sword for enjoyment.
    1 point
  38. Another old blade, this one in KAI GUNTO Navy mounts, at 52 cm some would call this (wrongly) a submarine crew sword, due to its shorter length. The large ray skin "eyes" on the SAYA are quite unique. I think it is made by KANETSUNA in the 1500's, but I am open to more knowledgeable translators.
    1 point
  39. I can hear 1000 Nihonto collectors' thoughts in my head... "You military Japanese sword collectors!....Stick with the wartime stuff and leave the good older swords to us!!"
    1 point
  40. Isn't that a Japanese granade
    1 point
  41. Collecting evil eyes from my wife and I must say I’m most successful in the field. Just had one of those glares and saw the opportunity to immediately add it to my collection or rather accumulation...
    1 point
  42. Picked up a couple a few Japanese medals for display, they're pretty cheap due to the astounding number of "Orders" for some of the medals. Indeed the lower order of popular medals can be bought almost by weight! Other than that a few flags, odds and ends like Sake cup, Generals parade sash and other things you unearth on ebay, militaria sites or locally. Japanese military swords are the only thing that have really grown into a "collection" proper though.
    1 point
  43. That sword looks to have kizu with the blue diamonds used to hide the flaws! Haha! I like it, fun to ward off the kiddos! I used to collect pens, guitars, Japanese classics and German handguns and quite a few others (my top three surplus were a 1937 Walther PP in 9mm Kurz, a 1941 T94 Nambu with two matching mags, and a P27 Mosin). I also worked and owned, not at once, an '85 Celica GTS, a '79 RX7 LE, and traded my Miata for an '85 RX7 GSL-SE, which I miss dearly. I used to collect a lot of militaria, to buy and sell, with the pieces given to me by vets as my keeps (which I still have) and the others as needed. My best finds were an SS dagger, an SS Smock, and an FJ smock. All sold Alas, in my collection, is an Esterbrook LJ, a Colt M1911 modified for National Matches, an 83 Squier Buller, and my 73 Honda Civic as my project when I return from Japan. Very very rusty, with quite a bit of solid steel, but much welding needed.
    1 point
  44. Beat me to it, Chris! I'm a hoarder and collector by nature, but I have a few bits of Japanese militia and a few kaskara swords, which I really like but don't seriously collect.
    1 point
  45. Interesting topic Neil, thanks! I just collect WWII Gunto, though, I do have some pre-WWII Type 32s. Like Chris, I began with rocks and coins. I still have two shadow-boxes of butterflies I caught and dried for display.
    1 point
  46. I learnt that Masayuki (or Kiyomaro) was a very famous smith, but also that he was faked a lot. I've also learnt over there, that the shape of the blade was a copy of a very old design, I think it was Naginata what I've been told how this shape is called (while these originally would be mounted to a wooden stick and have a longer handle). Asking on the WAF was quite annoying as well, especially since I was trying to get information on the blade, but all of a sudden some persons joined the conversation who started telling me my blade is a fake and nothing original, but on the other hand sent me Private Messages asking if I would sell it to them. Among them were also dealers, and if dealers have the necessity of telling you something is not good, but they still want to have it from you, my alarm bells ring. I didn't reply to any of these "offers" and choose to answer them in public that what they are doing makes them look suspicious. This however turned out to rather upset a few of them and try to defend themselves which brought the whole discussion not where it should go and I ended up rather unhappy with the results. By someone much more helpful I've then been suggested to instead post everything here, on this board. The whole story, all pictures, and see what persons here are telling me on it. I do know the chances are very little that this is an original blade, still there is some hope left. But of course in the condition it is in, it is tough to give an opinion on it. I've been told on the NBTHK and that they should be able to help me - fortunately a local friend is a member there and has sent me some book excerpts and other information. But being new to the topic makes it nearly impossible to understand all of these terms and the difference between fake applied markings and real applied markings. However, I'm happy with the blade. I had mentioned in my starting post that I've only had 100 Euro in the lot of three blades, and one paid for the other two. Which means that I did get my blade here for nothing. And considering the most plausible possibility - that it is a fake - there are worse things than to have a fake for nothing, despite of its condition. So that is why I decided for myself that I will be keeping it as a nice wall hanger in my gun room unless for whatever smallest chance it turns out to be original. Therefore I'd also kindly ask anyone in here to do not make any offers on this blade since I do not want to sell this one. My reason why to post here is only to learn something on it, and maybe get a good tip on how to properly restore it. I would rather not want to send it somewhere abroad, so maybe there is a chance or source for restoration in Continental Europe. Finally, the last set of very high resolution pictures I have made of it are attached. I had to rescale them to a lower resolution to be able to attach them here. I hope you have enjoyed the read and were not bored, so please don't be too harsh with someone who (so far) knows little to nothing on Nihonto!
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...