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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/27/2021 in all areas

  1. Finally, my contribution to a worthy cause! See the slip!
    3 points
  2. Hello, I'm making some room in the collection so I thought I would offer this up for grabs. It comes with the sword registration from Japan. Saya is signed Ikkanshi Tadatsuna Saku. Very nice crystallization shown in the hamon. There are a few very small forge marks but other than that the cutting edge is amazing and the tip is still needle point sharp. Please DM for more pics for serious inquires only. Nagasa: 50.3 cm. Sori: 1.1 cm. Moto-haba: 3.0 cm. Saki-haba: 2.4 cm. Moto-gasane: 0.6 cm. Saki-gasane: 0.5 cm. $2500 US shipped with tracking additional shipping if you live outside the US or Canada.
    2 points
  3. Eric As George read “Mino ju Kaneyoshi saku” and this one is Matsubara Shozo Kaneyoshi. Born Taisho 10 (1921 Jan 20). He was a student of Watanabe Kanenaga and the younger brother of Nakata Kanehide. He later became a Naval swordsmith. Summary and examples in Naval Swordsmiths Part 2, in the NMB Downloads. With a Sho/sakura stamp is an early war Showato.
    2 points
  4. Hi Arnold, You say you want to buy an original sword; if so, you need to buy only from a dealer you can trust 100% or you need to study first (and, shy of getting lucky, those are the only options you have). The fact that you are asking about such an obvious fake tells us you are a beginner. There is nothing wrong with that; we all have been there ourselves, but as a beginner you need either very good advise or a whole lot more knowledge than you currently possess. Otherwise you will run out of money quite quickly. Grey
    2 points
  5. Item No. 85: the subject is possibly 近江八景 - Ōmi hakkei, i.e. Eight Views of Ōmi. According to tradition, Regent Konoe Masaie and his son Hisamichi, while visiting Ōmi province near Kyōto, wrote eight waka poems describing famous scenes around the western shore of Lake Biwa. BTW, item No. 84 was assigned as ko-Shōami by a kanteisho? I'd rather say Heianjō-zōgan...
    2 points
  6. 7. With the beams in I decided to start in on the lighting. I used Hampton Bay mini tracks for this project. Here is what it looked like as I was installing: 8. Lights - check! Time to install the J brackets for the sword shelves. Or in this case level: B-A-L-A-N-C-E...balance (Can you guess the movie?). 9. With the brackets in - it was then time to install the beams. I used 2x4x8 stained in Kona.
    2 points
  7. 6. Quick humidity check for good measure: I'll post another update tomorrow. Please let me know if you have questions, thoughts, or concerns. Also - if you do not find this useful please let me know.
    2 points
  8. Yesterday, 03 / 07 / 2021, an event was held in Birmingham, the real one not the US copy, where Nihonto enthusiasts from all over the UK met for the first time after so many months of virus enforced separation. Special thanks must go to Ian Chapman and Mike Hickson - Smith for all their hard work in initiating the event, sourcing a venue and finally bringing the plan to its successful fruition. Unfortunately covid restrictions imposed limits on the number of attendees that could be accommodated in the space, but nevertheless if gave those sword lovers who could attended a foretaste of happier and less restrictive times that undoubtedly lie ahead. On display were a wide selection of fine swords, blades, fittings and accessories, some of which were old friends, but so many were new to me. Sadly I was unable to remain for the continuing festivities, that revolved around an evening meal, and something I find unbelievable, more liquid nourishment, but my few hours of exposure to the items on display and perhaps more importantly the opportunity to meet up with old friends, reignited a passion that this dreadful era of isolation had blunted. One again my thanks to Mike and Ian and let us look forward to making events like this a permanent feature in the future. Ian Bottomley
    1 point
  9. Hello, I have these two Tsuba and at first glance they look the same. I am looking for Information about them, but I do not get anywhere. Maybe someone can tell me something about it? Thank you in advance.
    1 point
  10. kanmuri-otoshi. Very similar to unokubi zukuri in that it tapers towards the mune...but it also has the area to the rear that is a short section like a shinogi zukuri with a groove.
    1 point
  11. Hi Jeff, Here is a care and cleaning brochure: https://nbthk-ab2.org/sword-characteristics/ scroll down to find it. We won't be able to tell much from pictures alone; the sword needs to be seen in hand by an honest person with knowledge. Where in the States do you live? Maybe there will be someone nearby. Best, Grey
    1 point
  12. Well done Piers and thank you! I would be grateful if you could share some images and lessons learnt from these NBTHK meetings. i am a Life member but alas have never been to an NBTHK meeting or conference in Japan (or anywhere in the world for that matter)! thank you again!
    1 point
  13. The tag will be the details of the person who surrendered it. Sword is a civilian mounted one, and looks quite nice indeed. Give the blade some oil, and nothing abrasive. I think you have a nice looking sword there.
    1 point
  14. Nice writeup and pics, thanks for sharing Piers.
    1 point
  15. Thank you so much, Maxime! I hadn’t seen it, and that was a great piece. I particularly liked seeing the live-in aspect of apprenticeship, the challenges there, and bond formed between student and sensei (not always built on positive reactions to each other).
    1 point
  16. Hard to say anything. Remove the tsuka (handle) and show us the naked sword. The upper part of the picture looks odd. It seems a little blue maybe from heat? But your pictures are not really telling anything. Only that it is a civillian sword with a surrender tag.
    1 point
  17. This is long past due, but I'm new here so have been slowly pouring through this fantastic thread. I'm really enjoying the diversity of your collection Bob, thanks for sharing it. #35 on page 6 is most likely Umetada. Although someone already suggested that, here's some evidence to back it up: This is a quote from Haynes & Long referring to the different branches of the Umetada school: "BANSHU (Harima) branch school: Working here are Muneyoshi, Shigeyoshi, Yoshihisa, Yoshitsugu, and Yoshitada. Some are related to the Kyoto artists of the same name." I have a few examples of Umetada Shigeyoshi tsuba in my images if you're interested.
    1 point
  18. And, if you already haven't checked it out, Ohmura's site is good for killing an hour or two (if you are into WW2 swords). A bit about Seki (in English) if you scroll down. http://ohmura-study.net/211.html
    1 point
  19. Will do that Bruce. This will be my first restoration project and I'm leaving it to the experts. From what board members have stated, David McDonald has an excellent reputation in Tsuka restoration, so I'm confident he'll do a great job. He wants me to send it to him after the SF Token Kai (unfortunately, I am not able to attend or I would deliver it in person) - David will have a table at the event. He informed me that it could be a month or two before I get it back, but it's worth the wait. Attached is a photo of the sword's tsuka in it's current, unwrapped state - note the missing menuki. Fortunately, the tsuka (the magnolia wood) is solid, as is the same (one small cut to the same in middle of tsuka, but will be covered by ito), so the repair will cost less than it would if I needed a new tsuka fitted. This should be a straight-forward wrap job with menuki added.
    1 point
  20. There is an old saying amount collectors "mumei is better than gimei" Of course, many gimei blades are great swords, but without the fake signature the blade would be even better.
    1 point
  21. Kusunoki Masashige, the big example for the kamikaze pilots, and all who want to die for the emperor. i know the Minatogawa jinja owns an armor, attributed as his, but in fact made in the 16th century. I would be very happy with some good pictures of this armor.
    1 point
  22. Welcome Ken. As a new starter myself....... Ditto to what Charles said! Using the search function on the forum reveals a huge store of knowledge, but if you can't find what you're looking for, the members here seem to have infinite patience with answering questions. Like Charles, my experience here is limited, but when I've asked for opinions, I've had lots of differing ones which is really useful to get different views - it's great for learning Cheers, Jon
    1 point
  23. Looks like successful bidder actually paid 550,000 Yen.....around US $5K.....blows me away. Might hold ontk the 95's until Japan relaxes it's import laws a little 😉 Rob
    1 point
  24. Very nice James! The lights should be LED. Dimmable would be perfect, so you have the possibility to create some asthmosphere and lower the “impact” to the pieces…
    1 point
  25. And don't forget the articles on this forum, lots of good information to help spot fakes.
    1 point
  26. im of the opinion there prices are a reflection of there high realestate prices ?? as a cost of buisness;s it must be past on???hmmm?
    1 point
  27. For Arnold’s (and everyone’s) sake, instead of just saying “it’s an obvious fake, hit the books,” can we please list some things that helped you identify it as a fake? Not all, but here’s what I saw right away: 1. Kanji on the mei was too spread out, on both sides, funkily chiseled (if it even WAS chiseled), and not normally recognizable characters (katakana?) 2. Thought the erotic scene on the kozuka was very out of place, and the figures themselves were too crude. 3. Kogatana’s blade shape was odd; the sori looked almost fantasy-like with the carved-out area. 4. Rust on nakago was an odd color, too bright. 5. Loose/missing seppas 6. seemed like the habaki and blade were off-center through the tsuba There are others certainly, but I think it’s helpful to take an extra few seconds to point out the WHY instead of always pointing towards the books without further context.
    1 point
  28. I do not think that GYO is a proper reading in this context. 1. He was not the Emperor but only one of the Imperial family. 2. "Gyoken'etsu" sounds unpleasant.
    1 point
  29. Great job James. Looks great. Keep us updated MikeR
    1 point
  30. this is Japanese based auction, so being a machine made blade there rare for them, compared to the west. hence the silly price. PS everyone knows my op on these, just though i would share
    1 point
  31. A little text about polishing from the Baur Museum in Geneva
    1 point
  32. A bit hard to see for my old eyes but I think it is signed by Kaneyoshi. I think your tang is signed MiNo Ju KaneYoshi Saku (Resident of Mino, Kaneyoshi made (this)). there were two of this name that I am aware of - both working in Seki. Yoshida Kaneyoshi started as Seki smith 8 Oct 1939 Matsuhara (also Matsubara) Kaneyoshi started at seki 11 Nov 1941 Not sure which is yours...
    1 point
  33. Larry, You mentioned that your interest is as a collector also. The gunto is worth collecting (possibly Iaido also), so I think Chris' comment about running away was concerning the price only. These gunto normally run in the $1,400-1,800 price range, so if the seller is willing to come down, and you still like the sword, go for it. But like Chris said, his price is double the market value.
    1 point
  34. 昭和十八年 - Showa 18th year (1943) 昭和十八年秋 - Showa 18th year, autumn 武久 - Takehisa
    1 point
  35. Russ, its true there is a lot of nonsense on facebook, but at this link you will find the writings of a fully qualified togishi (sword polisher) Andrew Ickeringill: https://www.facebook.com/toukentogishi Andrew spent 6 long, hard years in Japan learning polishing from Sensei Takushi Sasaki who in turn was taught by the Living National Treasure polisher Nagayama Koukan, also author of the book mentioned above The Connoisseurs Guide. Go here for a good video Best regards, BaZZa aka Barry Thomas Melbourne, Australia
    1 point
  36. To get the ball rolling, there are four rows of kanji characters on the back. The second row is repeated on the front which also has the police emblem at the top and firefighting emblem at the bottom. This is what I have trancribed so far. 1st row: 梨本総裁宮殿下 = Nashimoto sōsai kyūden-ka. 2nd row: 御檢閲記念 = O ken'etsu kinen. 3rd row: 昭和十二年四月十一日 = 1937-04-11. 4th row: 岡山縣 = Okayama-ken. As for what the characters are referring to, I will leave that to someone else. However, I think the reference to Nashimoto could be to 梨本宮守正王.
    1 point
  37. Hello from Maryland USA! To each of you that share your info/knowledge ofNihonto and Japanese culture I say thank you in advance. My interest is high but I don’t have much experience in the subject so I’ll refrain from commenting. I’ve got a lot of reading on this message board but I’m totally looking forward to it. Hopefully no one finds my ignorance too irritating if I ask questions!!!
    1 point
  38. I don't mind the two large 'replicas' they are well done and if you can't afford the real thing, they are good talking pieces. Now this one I have seen copied and copied over and over till it gets so bad you can't make out what it started out as - I think it could be Japanese stealing back the design from Paul Chen [Hanwei] who had a collection of famous identities made as guards - they were copied almost immediately by other Chinese factories and I think ironically very well by the Japanese. The "original" Hanwei had a distinctive rim that no one else has been able to replicate correctly. Amazing !! Even modern designs are being faked, nothing is safe !!
    1 point
  39. i seem to remember reading something some years back that was a discussion of the origin of sword smithing in Japan in connection with the Ainu. I can't quote a source, but I seem to recall that some early big names were theorized as being of Ainu descent. Anyone remember something like this? Thanks for sharing, Peter
    1 point
  40. Another interesting video that I have not seen in the selection, probably very well known, but for people who have missed it.
    1 point
  41. Glad you were there to capture those moments in history, Piers.
    1 point
  42. Ah! Thanks George! Really cool artwork and craftsmanship with the Uttori!
    1 point
  43. That is a fantastic menuki! Out of interest, can we get dimensions and a pic of the back?
    1 point
  44. Hi Leen. I'm glad you are interested in Japanese swordsmith. The descendants of Mizuno Masanori still run the business of making and selling kitchen knives. As you may already know, I will post a link to the HP. https://sakaimonichiba.com/hocho.html http://www.mizunotanrenjo.jp/
    1 point
  45. Congratulations Piers. It's certainly the same compared to the tang that Jacques showed us. Picking up a sword in a book is a rare luck.
    1 point
  46. Your inbox is full? Oh, well, wasn’t planning to strip naked in public, but ‘in for a penny in for a pound’. I’ll have to go take a shot! 😂 For Paul and Dirk
    1 point
  47. Well, you know my photography skills... 🤪
    1 point
  48. Tenryushi Toshimitsu(寿光). He was trained at Yasukuni Shrines Nihonto Taren Kai Foundation. Lineage, sakite for Yasumitsu/Yasunobu/Kazumitsu. Rikugun Jumei Tosho Chairman's award 1st Gunto Taren Kai 43. He was among smith's honored at the Prefecture level. By orders of the Imperial Military authority, he made 30 swords at the Fushimi Inari Shrine of Kyoto and donated the swords to the shrine. The Shrines Chief Priest, Suzuki Matsutaro, gave him the personal title of, "Inari Kokaji" or Inari's Swordsmith. (From the Yasukuni Book). Suzuki Matsutaro (Dezember 1945)
    1 point
  49. His name appears in the local history of his native place. According to the document below, his (real) personal name was Jinsaku (甚作). Ref. http://www15.ocn.ne.jp/~f-isa/kiji10.htm#1
    1 point
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