Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/07/2021 in all areas

  1. Many times the people making the translation request will themselves not know what they wish to understand from the document. In their minds, they may have an idea that the document will somehow tell them the details of the smith who made the sword, but in reality the document will just be a dry description of the sword itself. Is the sword old? Is it real? How much is it worth? These are basic things that people want to know, but this information isn't necessarily included in, for example, a registration certificate or a tag attached to a WW2 sword. Here I agree with Christopher and Michael, that the narrative "setsumei" which accompanies the Jūyō swords would be as valuable as, and more interesting than, the technical, almost boring, Jūyō certificate. The Jūyō document here in this thread is full of sword terminology which is meaningful for most of us here, but I'm afraid it will be impenetrable to a new person. And yet, there is no middle-ground. You either know the jargon, or you don't. The translator can include explanations of the terms to try to make it easier, but that is time-consuming. A paper like this could easily take hours to explain fully. In this case I think I probably looked at Jiri's post count, and felt he/she would be able to spend some time with a search engine as long as the text was machine-readable. So rather than me doing a deep-dive on what "ko-ashi hairu" means, or the nuances of "jinie-gakari", I put it into text so that Jiri can explore on his own, and then come back for further explanation on any terms that remain unclear. To the larger question of translation for free, Mywei has it absolutely correct: pursuing an accurate translation can be enjoyable and rewarding for the translator as well as the reader. It also brings new collectors to the site, which is (hopefully) good for the site and good for the hobby. Its also good to have a number of eyes and brains looking at inscriptions because, as we all know, translators make mistakes. So translation work - even complicated passages, can be a pleasure. I will avoid doing a translation if it looks like its going to be thankless drudgework ("I saw this possibly fake WW2 flag on ebay today, could you please translate the 100 names on it even though I might not bid on it"). If people wish to donate to the board when they feel they have received something of value, that is a great thing, and I'm happy to help. It does get complicated if people expect a service in return for a donation, so I wouldn't want to obligate either of us to that. There are so many entry barriers to Japanese sword collecting, that its a good thing for us to try to reduce those barriers.
    6 points
  2. The top picture is a date and the lower magnified picture a name. It’s hard to pick out the characters through the corrosion on the tang, but the date is something like Showa, 18th year, 4th month which boils down to April 1943 if I’m correct. The second digit of the year number is partially obscured. The smith’s name looks like “Kanemune”. All in all a fairly standard wartime blade made in Seki during the war. Others may have comments on the fittings.
    3 points
  3. Just out of interest on Kiipu's quote from Tojo about sand-iron (post #9), here is an oshigata of a gendaito (not dated) in WWII gunto mounts I came across 35 years ago...made from Tottori coast sand iron. It was made by Kunifusa (I think of Seki) . I sent this to Richard Fuller (pink book p.55). This must be one of the swords made from sand iron in WWII as per Tojo's article.
    3 points
  4. Hi Piers, let me help your here: - part of the Juyo certification 'package' is not only the Juyo cetificate (illustrated above) but also the detailed narrative about each Juyo item (be it a sword , kodogu, etc) in particular, which is published in the annual volume Zufu Nado of the items which were accepted as Juyo in that year (well the volume comes out the year after but that is another point). - so, having the certificate is important but so is the narrative - I know you are into armour, so the Juyo Zufu Nado setsumei is the equivalent of the Juyo Bunka volumes for Juyo armour with the narrative about each armour - this sword of Jiri's has come from Eirakudo, judging by the photography, a well known dealer in Nagano - e.g., see this Eirakudo page for what the 'full package' of paperwork looks like for a Juyo sword. So, for this Muramasa, it is the page with Japanese writing, which is immediately below the Juyo certificate and above the Juyo oshigata (which, by the way is part of the same section of the Juyo Zufu Nado dedicated to the particular sword) https://eirakudo.shop/token/tanto/detail/587480 - going into the setsumei of the Muramasa tanto, we can read the definitive statement that this Muramasa is by 'the second generation, who was the most skilled of the generations'. What is the benefit: well the oshigata and certificate do not specify nidai, but the setsumei does. So, the three-four last sentences of each setsumei usually contain interesting nuggets about the specific sword. Sometimes it is confirmation of daimyo provenance, sometimes it is about the generation, sometimes it is praise saying it is among the best masterworks of the smith (which is usually a good tokuju indicator
    3 points
  5. It's a WW2 Japanese army Type 98 officer sword Year of made:昭和十八年四月(1943.April) Smith: 兼宗 Kanemune, Civilian name 福本小市 Fukumoto Koichi.
    2 points
  6. Dear Bob, The Buffalo Tsuba (Number 72) is read "Yamashiro ju Nagayoshi saku" (the saku is very faint). He's Haynes 06554.0 and from 1550-1600. Checked the mei in Wakayama and it looks good. The tsuba looks like it was remounted many times in its long life, and the nakagoana looks like it was widened significantly at one time - perhaps for an "armor piercing" blade that was thick but not long in cross-section. The triangular cutouts were probably for sekigane to fit that shorter (cross-sectional) blade. In light of the date of original manufacture (1500's...) and shape/style around the seppadai, I think the filing for the kogatana was added later.
    2 points
  7. Steven, Could I beg photos of the date and the "Na" stamp for my Stamp Survey? Good luck with the sale!
    2 points
  8. Hi guys, the mei is signed 備中守橘當一康廣 - Bitchu (no) kami Tachibana Toichi Yasuhiro if shoshin will probably narrow it down to 1st generation Kii-Ishido Yasuhiro ~Kanbun era, who signed 紀伊國當一康廣 (Kii no Kuni Toichi Yasuhiro) before his title was bestowed and moved to Settsu See: https://www.juwelier-strebel.de/asian-art/Japan/567-katana, https://www.samuraishokai.jp/sword/15117.html
    2 points
  9. We were told that it was taken on the last day of the war…. Logistics section on the waterways patrol in Burma . That’s as much as we know. It’s really interesting to learn more about it.
    2 points
  10. Hi Steve, you have a Type 98 Shin Gunto with decent quality fittings and original tassel. The blade is signed "Kane_(can't make out the next character) and dated (My guess is around 1943). It is most likely this is a non-traditionally made sword and if you look closer on the Tang you may find a small 'Seki' stamp that indicates this. The blue and brown tassel indicates the Japanese officer held a rank between 2nd Lieutenant - Captain. All in all a nice honest example of a Japanese officers sword, the important thing is to try and get the history of how it was acquired in the war.
    2 points
  11. My firm goal is to make a plan to at least pay for a very nice dinner for some of the members here who are always so helpful. I think that would be nicer than just a monetary thanks. The problem is getting some of them to accept it. I know some of our Japanese members are reluctant to accept a thank you gift. And I don't want to leave anyone out either. But Steve, Moriyama san and Morita san at at the top of the list.
    2 points
  12. It might be the seller's interpretation of the manji and other characters on the tsuba. Some people get romantic notions about this stuff or simply use it as puff to sell the blade.
    2 points
  13. Dear Glen. Yes to all the above but the mei reads Bitchu no kami Yasuhiro. As I am sure you are aware the mei may be genuine or not but when we get those larger photographs we will be able to tell you more, hopefully. All the best.
    2 points
  14. Uwe, yes, I agree, but I have been unable to find an example of such a Sakura Mon that I could link to. We have to remember that by WWII, 80 years after the end of the Edo Period, people were freely creating new versions of Mon with distant links to ancestors on either side of their families.
    2 points
  15. Chris, thank you! It was from a local antiques dealer that always has great stuff but usually far more pricey than things are worth. This time around, I got to turn the tables on them, and we both ended up with a deal (he cleared some space in the crowded front case, and I got a great piece of history). When he told me the price, I was taken aback, but I even managed to haggle him down $50. I think I'm going to hold onto it for awhile, as I love the Navy connection. Maybe some day though!
    2 points
  16. 兼継作 - Kanetsugu made 昭和十六年 - Showa 16th year (1941)
    2 points
  17. Hi Jiri You don't ask you don't get so do nor worry about your request and it raised some interesting points which is good for all of us I felt much more comfortable when I paid Marcus but alas he no longer offers this service Steve will do what he wants to do that his his prerogative If you learn a lot then donations are always help Grev
    2 points
  18. 1st post longtime browser, I received this sword from a friend who's uncle brought it back from New Guinea. I think it maybe an old blade in a late war Koshirae. Blade is 58 cm in length and very heavy. Opinion's please regards Glenn
    1 point
  19. I share with you an menpo from my collection for which I require your help. it is an unsigned Edo period ressei menpo, very expressive of which I do not know the school. In natural iron, it has a very prominent upper lip (the mustache is missing) the teeth are silver lacquered and it has a wide sweat running hole and a otayori. What is your opinion about the school and the period (early to late Edo?). If you know of other similar menpo? Thank you in advance.
    1 point
  20. Thanks Steven! June 1943 to be exact, and you've just provided the only month missing in my survey for 1943! I had blades from every month of that year except June, and now I do, thanks to you! So, you have "bragging rights" if you want to claim them as the only "known" blade inspected by the Nagoya Arsenal in June of '43.
    1 point
  21. There's no need to beg Bruce. You're my peer and I would be delighted to help you in anyway I can. I believe it's a chief Nagoya inspection stamp and the date is 1943.
    1 point
  22. Looks like a nice early version that may feature prototypical elements. Please show us the whole rig. Peter
    1 point
  23. Like to see a couple of pics of the hamon, though, Richard. I've grown to believe the large Seki stamp went on nice quality non-traditonal blades. Also a full pic of the gunto mounted up, would be nice.
    1 point
  24. Steve, Some fabulous reading and pictures to get started on understanding your gunto: Ohmura's "Military Swords of Imperial Japan" website. And a great resource for vocabulary and almost anything else you would need to know about Japanese swords: Rich Stein's "The Japanase Sword Index." If you find an small stamps closer to the handguard (tsuba), and you may have to remove the tsuba to see it, or on the back edge of the tang (nakago), please post pictures!
    1 point
  25. Hi Steve, Do not try to clean the tang of your sword (the tang is the part that goes into the handle, with signature and date). Any attempt at cleaning might result in serious degradation of value. Here is a care and cleaning brochure you should take a few minutes to read (scroll down): https://nbthk-ab2.org/sword-characteristics/ Cheers, Grey
    1 point
  26. hi john i was holding the handle blade was not on the tiles it does look like that in the pic though . the blade is 58cm sorry about that i haven't worked out how to do the pics properly yet glenn
    1 point
  27. Forums like these are wonderful platforms to share knowledge, seek help and give help. I think many like to help simply because it brings them joy. Because they enjoyed being helped themselves in the beginning and now they can pass on their own knowledge or skills (translate). When I started there was no internet and therefore no forums. With appropriate books I struggled many, many hours with texts and signatures. But even today I still fail. Only weeks ago I asked here for help. Despite all efforts I simply came to no result in the Nengo of a dating of an Oshigata. Markus could help. It was a very unusual spelling variant for Showa. Without this help I would still puzzle today. So it is much easier today to get appropriate information and help. In the past it was a few people in the "neighborhood", today it is dedicated enthusiasts of the matter all over the world. And this resource is very valuable and good. But it does not replace the circumstance to penetrate into the matter and to acquire the knowledge by oneself (of course also with support of others - but just from own engagement). And help is important when you can't get any further with your own knowledge and skills. Jiri, please don't be angry with me. But I can understand Valric. If you spend a lot of money on an important blade, ideally you should know exactly what you are doing. And it just doesn't give the impression if you don't know what is written on the saya or in the Juyo certificate. BUT! I also know that many professional translators of "modern Japanese" have their problems with the specific texts of ancient Japanese blades. Which is why you are in good hands here again!
    1 point
  28. I was looking in the topic about the store. Now that. 😢 RIP Another well known name is gone. Thats sad.
    1 point
  29. Hi Piers, also “sumitategaku” with opposite “sakura” could be a possibility….?!
    1 point
  30. Heh, heh, good one Peter...Fred would like that. G.
    1 point
  31. Your sword also has a Seki arsenal stamp which indicates that it was not traditionally made.
    1 point
  32. Hi Micheal, If it is Japanese and edged weapon, from hundreds of years ago and up to recently made, including military swords, you will find it at the show. You will have little trouble selling a sword either. Ask my table mate Mark Jones to have a look; he does a lot of business in Japanese military swords. Cheers, Grey
    1 point
  33. Are dealers at tables interested in purchasing/trading from non-dealers? It feels odd to walk up to someone and go “Hey buddy, wanna buy a sword?” but I’m wondering if I should bring an Army Gunto to sell and save on shipping etc. Which brings me to a second question. From this nice walkabout video from 2016, it seems gunto (or at least Gunto mounts) are for sale. Is it largely traditional Nihonto (my guess), or does the convention have Japanese militaria as well? Again, thank you all for your time in replying. I’m getting SO excited, and this is all very helpful.
    1 point
  34. I ran across a picture of the above temple that depicted some of the swords that they had while reading Markus Sesko's blog. I thought others would be interested in seeing the picture and possibly reading the blog as well. In addition, I thought IJASwords would also enjoy seeing some really old crossguard molds! Cast Sword Fittings
    1 point
  35. So I apologize for my question and request for help. I just wanted to help with the translation. But when I see the following discussion, I am sincerely sorry that I did However, thanks again to Steve for his help. Arigato Steve Jiri
    1 point
  36. I think the piece has been remounted quite often, meaning it did have some importance to its various owners. It's also a very unique design. After some more searching I think the full signature will be: 山州住長吉 Sanshu Ju Nagayoshi/Chokichi
    1 point
  37. Love the buffalo details. Small alteration below. 長州萩住友次作 Cho-Shu Hagi Ju, Tomotsugu Saku.
    1 point
  38. Yes aggressive miniature versions of Bull ants [40mm] - sting like a wasp and they keep stinging. Caused at least four deaths between 1980 - 2000. Big mandibles but the stinger is in the tail, Jack Jumper size: 12 to 14 mm (0.47 to 0.55 in) They can jump 10cm repeatedly when defending themselves. Ants and more ants - https://www.jauce.com/auction/g535098108
    1 point
  39. 1 point
  40. My feeling is that it is not the urn for the ashes (thank goodness). In my experience the urn for the ashes is ceramic, larger than this, and is without any writing on it. The writing on this object means it was meant to be seen - so probably a flower vase that sits on the family gravesite.
    1 point
  41. Hi Paul You need to add a price for all sales.
    1 point
  42. Some pictures of Fujiwara Kanefusa, 25th generation: http://www.art-mamuka.ru/gallery/fujiwara-kanefusa-25-generation/
    1 point
  43. Agree with Marco. You'll find as you get to know more about the Japanese sword, from the very beginning, that smiths often didn't sign their blades. It's called mumei when not signed, and you'll see very old and beautiful blades that are mumei as often as you will see them signed. So, the practice seemed to continue all the way through WWII. It is often said that when rushed, when large quotas must be met, the smiths would skip signing. Sounds plausible. When Japan moved into China for real in the 1930s, and WWII escalated, the demand for swords greatly exploded. Industry had to make advances in mass-production to attempt meeting the needs of the military. Machinery aided in steel making and blade production, but they were always tools. Real people made all the war blades. It's hard to tell from your photos what kind of production was used on your blade. It's not stamped, so there is a good chance it's gendaito, but only the blade can tell, and that from first-hand inspection from an expert. But, well-lit photos and clear close-ups can help guys on the forums make an educated guess sometimes.
    1 point
  44. Indeed, this is sad news. Fred was always good to me, friendly and interesting.Fred was also a real "type" who adventurously rode the "Nippon-to" market, finding answers to problems and resources to demands. He also creatively explored the frontiers of the world - Japan, the Philppines, the emergent internet and Sword Shows. I can see him being one of the guys who showed up at Dejima in 1630 and begin setting up deals. Peter
    1 point
  45. Well, it's been a year since I started this thread. I've covered most of the (blatant) tricks that have been circulating lately, so at a good stopping point. I think that's the end of my updates. Thanks, all.
    1 point
  46. As a professional metal artist working almost exclusively in this field I must say up front I have a vested interest. While it may be that in many, maybe most, cases a contemporary commissioned koshirae would be a financial loss in terms of resale this is not necessarily always the case. A tsuba I made 7 years ago was subsequently valued by Christine's in London for £35 000, a 7 fold increase in value. A number of other pieces and sets of mine have been resold and yielded a modest profits for the sellers. And by contrast its pretty easy to lose money on antique pieces depending on where the market happens to be when you need to sell. I should add here that I'm not looking for work either as I've closed my order books because I have too much work to do as it is. Personally speaking it's reassuring that there are some people who are prepared and enthusiastic about commissioning new work because without their support the craft would not survive in any form.
    1 point
  47. Paul, as it has no price, I would like to take two of them, please! Very nice blade!
    0 points
×
×
  • Create New...