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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/05/2021 in all areas

  1. According to Richard Fuller ultra rare " first pattern Warrant Officer grade Mountings,having plain backstrap, and pierced Guard. early pattern army kyu gunto use a sakura screw through the Hilt side ears plus a Mekugi peg, if a hand forged blade is used... In this case a first Gen. "Omi no kami fujiwara Tsuguhira", with TBH-Hozon, Ubu Ha and Bohi, sure a real old familie treasure....
    6 points
  2. Not sure if i've ever showed my polished Ishido Teruhide, but here you go. A sword I personally enjoy having and looking at. Very tight hada that is hard to make out when it's not properly clean. Thank you for watching! Pictures are heavily resized due to file size limit
    3 points
  3. 62 ken Koboshi Kabuto with 2000 rivets Edo Jidai with Tokubetsu Hozon paper ( doesn't mention school ) Russet iron Menpo
    2 points
  4. Ive got a Sukezane i call Susanne
    2 points
  5. I agree with Chris. You will have to go a long way to see better nanako
    2 points
  6. I don't usually handle submissions, unless it's something special that I'm interested in seeing how it works out (i.e. you found a Kiyomaro) or it's something I sold and the owner is looking to upgrade. I do those for no charge. Otherwise I point people to Bob Benson or someone else specializing in it, as it's a lot of paperwork and have to constantly be touching base with the customer and with the handler in Japan... so usually someone doing agent work like that needs to do it in bulk in order to justify the time.
    2 points
  7. Dear Bob, re item no. 53. These two kanji can be read as "Masayuki" or "Shozui". Haynes had dozens of Masayuki but only two signing with these kanji (and he doesn't provide much useful info on them). He also has two Shozui signing with these kanji. One of them is the very famous Hamano Shozui and the other is an Ishiguro artist. Based on the style (and provenance comments), I believe that yours is intended to be Hamano Shozui. He is the founder of the Hamano School and considered as the 4th member of the Nara Sansaku (one of the four greatest artists of that time period). With respect to Shozui, Haynes says: "The majority of the signed examples seen today are forgeries, particularly the tsuba." Here are some mei from Wakayama and Sesko to compare. I hope that @Curran will comment because I believe that he has studied Shozui fairly extensively....
    2 points
  8. I would say my opinion, which has a high chance of coming up wrong: a) Really o-kissaki. Surprisingly uncommon choice historically, which boxes it to either 1355-1395 or 1570-1620 (very few makers) or shinshinto. b) Matsukawa-class hada. Pretty obvious which school was being copied. b) High contrast well forged hada but hamon is very smudged and does not show standing out nie or even well grouped ko nie. It barely shows anything when looking from up down. Also the mokume has very high contrast but not so much ji nie. It does not have the nie substructure one typically sees on early Etchu work. So its someone who mixed up the steels in mokume, hardened in nie and the creation literally blew up into his face. Now he tempers in nioi, maybe allowing for ara nie in couple of areas. There were some Norishige imitators in Nambokucho period who came close, Yamamura Masanobu - would have strong nie in hamon. One would see more choji-gunome in Naotsuna's school, more sunagashi in Nobukuni. Sanekage, Tametsugu - strongly nie based hamon. Uda Kunifusa - possible. He also typically makes very Yamato-like hamon without much gunome or togari, like here. So my third choice would be him. He is seldom found with o-kissaki and hamon has strong visible "belts". Either tired/did not photograph well or its not Uda. There were also good Norishige reenactors in Momoyama-Kanei and even Kambun period (Noritoshi), but I don't remember any of them doing such long kissaki. Some are a bit similar to this style though. Then, in shinshinto mixed up steel and tempering to pure nioi was a trademark of the entire Norishige rediscovery movement, though they often referenced Go rather than Norishige per se. Ikkansai Yoshihiro was likely style's founder, than it went into Naotane's remote lineage through quite a few of his "grandstudents".
    2 points
  9. Sorry to hear that! Regardless, it is a lovely piece!
    2 points
  10. Just getting back from overseas and seeing this thread now. With the swords being described, Kaneyuki, Naoe Shizu, shodai Tadayoshi special ordered by the Nabeshima daimyo, etc this sounds much like a collection we discussed here earlier. My apologies if I am mistaken.
    2 points
  11. A high class Koshirae, everything but the kitchen sink included on this one...
    2 points
  12. Hello, Time to change the atmosphere and open fresh air for my new acquisitions so here it goes. It isn't papered However I guarantee Hozon as it is or your money back. I am here for the long haul so definitely not looking to pull a fast one. The blade has no loose hada, no rust and IMHO a Japanese trained togishi probably wouldn't need to go back many stones to make it pristine. I see an amazing o gunome hamon and tightly kniw hada throughout and the boshi is still well preserved. No , this is Not kazu uchi mono judging by many factors. Also, many know that thin gasane was a trait for Sukesada at that period so as you may see not much has been 'shaved' off. I think it is a great and healthy blade that needs minimum to be pristine once again. Nagasa: 18" Motogasane: 5.1mm Mihaba: 27 mm Sakihaba: 22mm 2500 obo plus PP. Free shipping in the ConUS Cheers, John
    1 point
  13. Hi guys selling the above book. this book covers most of the swords and koshirae housed in the Hie shrine, there is oshigata and colour photos, the book is in 97% mint condition. the books excess to requirments. Price $75 USD with all paypal fees included. postage extra
    1 point
  14. Hi! My believe is that this kabuto is not typical for Bamen school. The iron hachimanza is rather large compared to the general size from the Bamen. The mabesashi is not typical for Bamen koboshi of the period (could be a replacement). The koboshi should be more conical. There is no gunbai pattern typical for Bamen koboshi (few exeptions are extant). The harai date doesn’t feel right. Lovely old kabuto but I think the origin is from somewhere else. Nice find. Anthony
    1 point
  15. I have a wakizashi that was named "Mr. Chips" by the Togi-shi... Dan
    1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. What you do Chris is pick a smith who you think it might be then MAKE it fit
    1 point
  18. Uwe might be right, logically. Artistically though, they are too squashed up for proper balance. Besides, the Soyo 宗世 signatures that I have managed to find, are quite different in style. Many later artists are not listed in the old books, so sometimes the line of least resistance is to assume someone from a school, or emulating the style of that school. The other possibility is a later, added signature to give an extra je ne sais quoi.
    1 point
  19. “宗世一刀” [Muneyo (Sōyo) Ittō]
    1 point
  20. Yes Piers (and Luc), early Edo is a save bet! What might speak for Bamen are the simple iron tehen-no-kanamono and the three rows of rivets on the front plate. The shape of the rivets, on the other hand, is not typical Bamen school. Although there is (at least) one helmet by the hand of “Masayuki” with similar hoshi....so further discussion is needed! Hard to tell from the pics if the shikoro (with “副” on the fukigaeshi) is a later addition or refurbished in Edo times. The ressei-bō, however, seems to be mid/end Edo.... PS: Maybe it’s only the picture, but the longitudinal axis of the construction seems not clean?!
    1 point
  21. Hey Kaz, like I said first up..I just dont know why you want to do that. But if you really want to play/experiment then buy something like this and go for your life! But give the real blades (whole blades in any condition regardless) a miss. Rob
    1 point
  22. Ikkansai group, shinshinto the habaki moto looks way to clean, no waisting from polishing. but iv neither handled both groups
    1 point
  23. It would not be so bad if they were marketed as 'replicas' [and priced that way] and these are not utsushi which would be a compliment to the original, these are deliberate fakes meant to deceive. It is a very interesting hobby isn't it !
    1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. Dale, it's exactly as you said. This makes your discovery the third, no doubt about it that someone is making a mold from a picture. Buyers can buy a file that removes burrs, and then they can complete their tsuba and enjoy the self-satisfaction of owning a museum piece and the same type product. If it is made in Japan, it will be repeatedly found in online auctions. Maybe it is made in a foreign country?
    1 point
  26. I do believe the gap between Tokubetsu Hozon to Jūyō is exponentially more difficult than achieving Tokubetsu Hozon from Hozon. A while back I did run some potential statistics about the numbers of swords that had passed any given level by modern NBTHK classification. While they are not 100% correct it can give some idea about the numbers of swords with each level of classification. Can you post details on the signed Kaneuji? The potential Shizu naginata you posted a picture of, is it a naginata or a naginata-naoshi? I would love to hear more details about the Uda tachi.
    1 point
  27. That is absolutely true and is probably another nail in the coffin. I'm interested in testing the boundaries of what is "true". There are so many things that are true until they are not. When the experiment is finished, I can say "This is -confirmed- true because here are the pictures and here is the evidence." So far I have 3 first hand accounts of Cosmoline on Gunto blades: 2 say it did not stain and 1 says it does. I was hoping for unanimity. I absolutely would carry out a study of animal fat on Nihonto if I could get an appropriate, unsalvagable piece. Or cooking oil. Or anything. What if it's better? For what it's worth I'm not currently putting Cosmoline on any of my blades. They're all safely Choji oiled in the recommended way.
    1 point
  28. Kabuto Signed Myochin Iyehisa Born 1532- died 1614 38 Ken 468 rivets Menpo Russet iron
    1 point
  29. Thank you very much , I am just trying to learn and hearing all comments were of a great help to me. I'm sure it would be more helpful to have the piece in hand when trying to determine who made it. I have to stick a scope down the Tehen yet to see if it is signed. Again thank you for sharing your knowledge.
    1 point
  30. It is also setup for a very rare dust seal seppa but sadly the original seppa is missing. I am searching for one if anybody happens to have a spare, even a spare one from a Type 3/Rinji model may work for me.
    1 point
  31. My second sword which I used for Iaido practice I named "Tsukiyuki" or moonlit snow. I chose this name owing to the choji-midare Hamon that looked like rolling hills of moon lit snow, and the fact that the maker of the blade was Yukisada. I was inspired by the poem "Tsukiyuki no, Naka ya, inochi no, sute dokoro" which may be rendered "The moonlit snow, is where life, is to be tossed away..." This sword was lovingly donated to the Tsurugaoka Hachimangu in Kamakura in 2001. I published an article about the whole ordeal in the newsletter of the Northern California Japanese Sword Club, it has been a while since I have revisited that article ー I believe I will post it here in its own thread for the amusement of the members.. -t.
    1 point
  32. Interesting... I wrote a bit about this for our Iaido magazine - "Obi". The Naming of Swords by Gwyn Mowll Whilst cleaning my Nihonto the other day, I noticed how over the years I have given them all names. This was not intentional at all, it simply happened. It's very useful as well because I can reference which one is which when writing up on them and cataloguing. Some are indeed named after the smith that made the blade and I have two Gunto's (WWII Blades) named Yoshe Tsugu and KaneTsuna. The very first Nihonto I collected, an antique Chisaii Katana (Small Katana) is called Hiroda after the name written in ink on the inside of the leather combat cover that it was found in. Another Katana I have has very nice Koshirae of two friends or scholars doing various things like having tea together, so this one was named Tomodachi (Friend) because of the theme on these lovely fittings. The Koto Nambucho blade I have came with both Iai fittings and with a spare set of original Koshirae. It was originally Oshita Sensei's sword. On swinging this sword, it has a deep sultry sounding Tachi Kaze, hence I named her "Marlene" (after the singer and actress Marlene Dietrich.) The sword made by Sada Toshi is housed in magnificent Koshirae made by Ford Hallam. The Tsuba, Fuchi and Kashira depict reeds on the river whilst the Menuki are Dragonflies resting on a pebble. This riverside theme is enhanced with light green Tuka Ito and Sageo. She is called "River Song". Another Chisaii Katana I have is very old and the steel is now "tired" (probably won't take another polish) She is named O-Baa Chan (Grandmother). My iaito is called Tsugi Kage (Moon Shadow). Naming swords is not an unique thing, throughout history we have heard the legends of famous men and their swords and these swords had names. Perhaps the most famous of all is "Caledfwlch"; Arthur's sword known more famously as "Excalibur". Caledfwlch which translates from Welsh as "Hard cleft" was first mentioned in the ancient Welsh oral stories known as the "Mabinogi". These oral stories were originally the basis for Geoffrey of Monmouth's much later writings that gave birth to the Arthurian legends and it was he who gave the sword a more French sounding name hence Excalibur. Caledfwlch is described in the Mabinogi in the story called The Dream of Rhonabwy, "Then they heard Cadwr, Earl of Cornwall being summoned, and saw him rise with Arthur's sword in his hand, with a design of two serpents on the golden hilt; when the sword was unsheathed what was seen from the mouths of the two serpents was like two flames of fire, so dreadful that it was not easy for anyone to look." Most people think of Caledfwlch as a Cross hilted sword, however that design came much later and the "real" Caledfwlch probably would have been based on a Roman Spatha or Cavalry sword as it is believed that the real Arthur was a post Roman era (Romano Briton) war chief struggling to defend this land "Prydain" against the Angles, the Saxons and the Jutes. The Japanese also have their legends and the most famous sword in all of Japan's history is Kusanagi-no-Tsurugi, a sacred sword found in the tail of a slain monster which became one of the three sacred treasures. In the Tale of the Heike, a collection of oral stories transcribed in 1371, the sword is lost at sea after a naval battle.There are many other famous swords some real, some fictional that have entered the history or story books, the following being only a few: Colada and Tizona are the legendary swords of El Cid, Campeador of Spain. Zulfiqar the legendary sword of Ali ibn Abi Talib (cousin and son-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad) Joyeuse - Charlemagne’s sword. Legbiter - a sword that belonged to the Viking King Magnus III. William Wallace’s sword. Honjo Masamune - The most famous of all Masamune swords is named Honjo Masamune. The Honjo Masamune is so important because it represented the Shogunate during the Edo period of Japan. The sword was passed down from one Shogun to another for generations. In 1939 the weapon was named a national treasure in Japan, but remained in the Kii branch of the Tokugawa family. The last known owner of Honjo Masamune was Tokugawa Iemasa. Apparently Tokugawa Iemasa gave the weapon and 14 other swords to a police station in Mejiro, Japan, in December of 1945. Shortly thereafter in January 1946, the Mejiro police gave the swords to Sgt. Coldy Bimore (U.S. 7th Cavalry). Since that time, the Honjo Masamune has gone missing and the whereabouts of the sword remains a mystery. Honjo Masamune is one of the most important historical artefact to disappear at the end of World War II. Gwyn Mowll Gwynedd Seiro Kan Dojo
    1 point
  33. is this a double entendre?
    1 point
  34. Its my %100 belief that uchiko is %100 damaging blades in polish unless done by a fully trained togi and the older I get the more this becomes obvious.
    1 point
  35. Item No. 51 Tsba in Shibuici with gold, silver and shakudo detailing 7.64 cm x 7.53 cm x 0.49 cm Two butterflies , three spiders webs and large dragonfly on a fine Ishime ground. Signed Nara Tadashige and Jochiku with a kao . This is therefore a dai-saku work from the Nara and Murakami Schools from the 19th cent. Looks considerably better in hand than in photographs - the very fine Ishime giving a matt surface finish , very evenly applied . The webs glow and almost jump out from the tsuba in the right light and the detailing on the insects is very well done. Just as a bonus , the dragonfly's eyes are inlaid with a striking green iridescent mother of pearl/ abalone , that really stand out . Have been unable to place Nara Tadashige - does not appear to be shown in the genealogies book . Also there are two artists shown as signing Jochiku in the Murakami school.... Any Haynes or Wakayama references would , as usual , be much appreciated.
    1 point
  36. Hello friends Please enjoy some private pics of Yasunori san with me, shortly before his passing away.
    1 point
  37. Hello, this is my only Kai Gunto with the following signature. Hattori Tanto Jo Saku
    1 point
  38. A Type 98 with Samegawa saya, they are fairly uncommon to find on Army swords. The blade is a decent Seki-To by Murayama Kunitsugu, one of the nicer half forged ones I believe.
    1 point
  39. Nice to find original photos of Generals with sword & tassel visible.
    1 point
  40. Mint condition vs field used company grade tassels. These are the uncommon variant with a "V" or Herringbone stitch on the straps:
    1 point
  41. Jim, agree! My polished NOBUFUSA is a also go-to sword for enjoyment.
    1 point
  42. I don't think there's any advantage to having any cleaning done before shinsa. It's in pretty good nick and looks spot on in my opinion. Good luck.
    1 point
  43. 3.55” high x 2.95” wide 0.40” at rim 159 gr. I’m just... awestruck. This beauty’s going to shinsa for sure! (I think it was the whisker-holes on the dragons’ muzzles—and the way the nanako bends around the mimi—that finally broke my brain...) While this may be gimei, I keep thinking of Darcy’s article on Ichijo’s unreal ability to work in hyper-miniature. There a few tiny areas of blunt-force damage to the nanako, but the condition otherwise seems fantastic. There is heavy grime visible within the centers of the coiled dragons that I’m not about to mess with. Would love to have you all’s input, and particularly Mr. Ford’s: Is there any reason NOT to immediately pursue shinsa? I was thinking that the expense of any restoration work should be delayed until I get positive shinsa results—or would my odds at shinsa be improved by having it restored first? Thanks guys, off to go breathe into a paper bag...
    1 point
  44. If that work is gimei i it wouldn't bother me 😀
    1 point
  45. I’m not completely certain as I can’t rotate the picture but the signature may read Goto Hokyo Ichijo plus Kao. A big name if correct and genuine...
    1 point
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