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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/20/2021 in all areas

  1. Thought others may find this interesting as often these are in full relic condition. I imagine it would've been quite hard for the Togishi to achieve:
    4 points
  2. Up for sale is a Katana signed "Musashi no Kami Fujiwara Kanenaka - Echizen-ju", circa 1680 AD, with NBTHK Hozon certification. Blade is unaltered with it's original length cutting edge of 69.8cm/27.5in. Kanenaka received Wazamono ranking for sharpness so his blades were known for their performance. Kanenaka was originally from Ichijo in Echizen, but later moved to Musashi, which is why he signed both in his Mei. The polish is in good condition, the blade is overall healthy with no fatal flaws. Comes in a fairly recent Shirasaya and plain habaki. The Koshirae is very nice and tastefully done. The iron fuchi and kashira are from the Higo School, along with a delicately made Tetsu Sukashi Tsuba. The saya has lacquer work made of palm fiber carefully placed with layers of lacquer to protect it. Overall a very nice package. $7200 net to me gets it to your door in the US. If you are interested send me a PM. Thanks for looking. Wayne
    3 points
  3. A pocket folder is essential, from whittling away some problem, to digging out slivers, to opening parcels, even in a pinch cleaning a pipe bowl. Imagine all the things a pocket knife can do; MacGyver to Bond. 'Nuff said. John
    3 points
  4. Some additional views showing wear from use , extra detail etc...
    3 points
  5. Some of the collection belonged to one of the most important European sword collectors in history. Jean-Jacques Ruebell. Father was a general for Napoleon and his grandfather a general in the revolutionary war. He donated 350 European swords (he had all types) to the Met and basically seeded its arms and armor collection as a result. They wrote a lot of articles about him in the 20s and 30s. Since he was born rich and never had to work he devoted himself to sword collecting. Of all types and cultures. The 350 that he gave to the Met had items going as old as the 1300s. He liked small art items, as he collected other art too, but his idea was he wanted objects he could share with friends and people who visited him to show them or teach them or amuse them. As a result he had a lot of daggers and that extended to tanto. As various diplomats went around those that came back from Japan and found their way to Paris by diplomacy or retirement seem to have sold off items they had at House of Drouot and he was constantly there picking up whatever they brought. His own collection went out in 1933 and had many beautiful things (Shinkai daisho with Omori Eishu tosogu, Minamoto Masao daisho with Ishiguro tosogu, Awataguchi Yoshimitsu tanto, etc.) A very small bit of that auction in Paris were fractional parts of his collection held over since 1933 in another family. Back in 1933 though he sold off 2 Nobuie tsuba and 3 Kaneie tsuba and a lot of other nice things... maybe they are floating around Paris still today? Get to work Jean.
    3 points
  6. Steve You think Nihonto snobbery is bad. I'm mainly a knife collector (have been since age 7), the knife collecting community is several orders of magnitude worse. Of course I'm a traditonalist, have carried the same pocket knife (Victorinox tinker) for about 30 years. Have had maybe a thousand or so; now down to a couple hundred Rich Apology to all - off topic.
    3 points
  7. @MHC Dear Mark, are you thinking of the "Hoshizukiyo Masamune" that Darcy sold? https://yuhindo.com/hoshizukiyo-kencho/
    2 points
  8. Is the design the same both sides if it then Bushu If the design shows shows a front and the back of the item then Choshu
    2 points
  9. It's a ring....goes over the saya.
    2 points
  10. Ugo ju Kuniyoshi saku https://www.toukenkomachi.com/index_en_tachi&katanaA080314.html
    2 points
  11. There were some really great Koshirae! Is there a way to see the results?
    2 points
  12. Item No. 45 Kozuka in Shakudo with gold and silver highlights Subject of cherry blossoms with cutting tool - are the blossoms tied to a pole of some sort ? Is this something to do with the cherry blossom festivities ? Fine nanako and engraving Over 450 years old , from late Muromachi period. Unsigned but papered as Ko - Goto by the NBTHK. Bought direct from Japan some 8 years ago.
    2 points
  13. pure plain silver
    2 points
  14. Hi Chris, Yes, amazing indeed. I know this is a nihonto board, but I couldn't resist adding to Dave's post....in fact, the same family gave me their mother's settler revolver also. Women back then often carried arms when driving wagons or were passengers in coaches...this is a little Belgian Francotte revolver cal 297/230 which is about 22 cal but with a more powerful charge. (this was a common cadet rifle round in the British Empire 1890-1930). The owner was Ida Borstel, married to the soldier Sgt Dick Borstel in the pic (standing rear middle). She was born Natal South Africa 1881 and came to Western Australia 1907. She married Mr Borstel in 1923 and they were rural settlers. The Hood and Borstel families intermarried. (sorry for this Brian)... Regards,
    2 points
  15. No. Everyone needs to carry a knife. I use mine multiple times a day. Everyone I know carries one. None of them stab anyone. 60's/70's USA...every kid in the USA carried one. There was no knife crime. Look elsewhere.
    2 points
  16. A friend of mine for many many years, Robert Cole, has been working on a book that is worth being in your library. You might know him from his website sho-shin.com That site is one of the pre-eminent sites on Japanese swords. His book is described in the paragraph below. An easily portable Index and 'Go to' Quick Reference to All Ancient Japanese Samurai Sword-makers. Ancient Kanji used throughout. Cross-references common works, curing Hawley errors and provides a real market pricing gauge with the Tokuno Pricing Scale and Fujishiro Value System. http://www.falconspress.com/sho-shin-index.html http://www.sho-shin.com/index2.htm
    1 point
  17. Way above my head, but in case someone is interested... https://www.tessier-sarrou.com/catalogue/113434?
    1 point
  18. Type 94 with offset Chuso and Type 98 with central Chuso.
    1 point
  19. Barry wrote: "My car has a Gerber multitool. Dull knives are dangerous. Always keep the knife sharp." Likewise, I've carried a pocket knife for over 65 years. First a barlow my grandfather gave me, then mostly a scout folder, stockman, Buck 110, etc., now a Victorinox Tinker that's been in my pocket for about 30 years. Used daily. Rich
    1 point
  20. I live in a city. I have carried a pocket knife for many decades. I use mine regularly. I used to carry a leatherman multitool but now only get that when necessary. My car has a Gerber multitool. Dull knives are dangerous. Always keep the knife sharp.
    1 point
  21. 哈鐵----(滿鐵)哈爾濱鐵路分局( Mantetsu Railway )Ha Er Bin substation
    1 point
  22. Photos added for later when sale is dead.
    1 point
  23. Well the prices realised are up and there are a few surprises. Lot 5 for example. I imagine both the vendors and the auctioneers are very satisfied! All the best.
    1 point
  24. There is a series of vid's on You Tube made by a group called "Yuri Gagarin", they excavate Russian Battlefields of WW2. Amongst other stuff they brought one of these up out of a swamp.... along with the remains of the soldier who carried it. Chilling stuff, but absorbing.
    1 point
  25. I think it's real with swapped out parts. Fuchi and tsuba are wrong and the absence of the screw is probably because they couldn't replace it after the swap as the thckness was different.
    1 point
  26. I trust you gentlemen it’s a kurikata, but if so, due to the weird shape, how was it attached to the saya?
    1 point
  27. Over 200,000 yen! I liked it but not that much.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. The other watch makers you'll see made for Japanese military are Longines, Ulysse Nardin, Stauffer, Cyma and Excelsior. Most of the other brands were private purchase or captured. Longines and Seiko are definitely the most common, I've only ever seen railway markings on Seiko watches though
    1 point
  30. @Bruce Pennington @Kiipu Check these out
    1 point
  31. ChrisW said: “ That or a G/K43 rifle or an SVT-40. Something about 10 round semi-autos are just so much fun at the range!” My SVT40
    1 point
  32. Hi Mark Mine is being shipped out today. I intend to write a review once I have read it. I will provide more information when I have it.
    1 point
  33. It looks like cherry tree bark.
    1 point
  34. my new one very much scratched
    1 point
  35. If my poor English misunderstands the subject, I have to apologize and correct it. "The temperature was too low 50℉." Was heard from the broadcast, and Yoshihara himself said. I didn't look at the video and make that decision. It seems that the broadcaster has closed the online viewing. The entire process of Yosindo Yoshihara in its heyday is available in video in English. In the commentary of the video site where he himself is linked, it is written as "Yohindo Yoshihara". It may be rude to him, but wouldn't it be nice if he could be identified? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxwWf-MfZVk
    1 point
  36. What I thought - there is so much overlap between the two that it is very hard to tell without a signature. Thanks very much.
    1 point
  37. ....or CHÔSHÛ?
    1 point
  38. Processing a new collection now. These swords include: A fine signed and dated BIzen blade that was published in Fujishiro Nidai Tadahiro katana and wakizashi Juyo Shikkake katana and others....
    1 point
  39. A little pocket rocket! My second love is antique firearms. I have a great affinity for oddball calibers and design concepts. My favorite being the Walther Model 1 and 2 .22 autoloader rifles. They're WILD in that they're both bolt-action 5 or 10 round magazine fed .22 rifles; but if you turn the bolt up, they fire in semi-automatic! I have both, and I cherish them. Plus they get some looks at the range when I switch them over to semi-auto! I found my Model 1 in a local shop, broken and in pieces. Bought for $100 and had a gunsmith who specializes in antique firearms repair it; charged me $125. Best $225 I ever spent. Loved it so much, I bought a Model 2 (which is much beefier)
    1 point
  40. Item No.44 - Kozuka in Shibuichi with gold highlights Subject Shoki and Oni Finely engraved with Katakiri work , Shoki is looking up into a tree where a rather annoyed oni is trying to hide. Signed Rakuosai Michiyoshi - Sano School - Haynes H 05079. Probably dates from around 1800. Purchased 8 years ago from auction in Germany. NBTHK papered.
    1 point
  41. Ah Dave...memories eh. Here is my own little kukri that was given to me by a local family. The kukri was a gift to this Aussie soldier (ambulanceman in pic) from a wounded Nepalese Gurkha whom he saved after their attack on the Turkish lines on Sari Bair hill, Gallipoli, Aug. 1915. The 6th Gurkhas were the only allies who reached the top of the hill (the Aussies and Kiwis being shot to pieces) and when the RN warships out at sea saw movement on the hilltop, thinking they were Turks, shelled them off again. Thus our Aussie medics had to go in and bring out the wounded. This Gurkha gave this kukri to Staff/Sgt Alex Hood (standing rear left) as a "thank you" for getting him out. This is probably the only identified kukri to come back from Gallipoli? Regards,
    1 point
  42. This forum isn't about wheeling and dealing, we aren't a financial advisory board so please stop treating it like one.
    1 point
  43. Here is what they look like normally: https://buyee.jp/item/yahoo/auction/543903216
    1 point
  44. here is a better picture. Hope it helps
    1 point
  45. Don't know if I'm seeing more that what's there, but maybe this is hail stones in rain? Found on a 1940 Sadakatsu HERE.
    1 point
  46. Truly unusual. Looks legit. And with the first seppa in place, you'd never even know it's different. Pics added for the future.
    1 point
  47. Thank you John. The injury to the hand is a severed nerve, so while I'm unlikely to make a full recovery, there will be significant improvement. I'm feeling very fortunate overall. It was an attempted murder (the guy has been apprehended and charged by police) rather than an accident; but due to some excellent medical care and a few surgeries, the hand is the only major lingering issue. Very briefly, I was out running with my wife and came across a man assaulting a young woman and making death threats to an elderly couple. I intervened, he attacked me and a fist fight ensued. After a few moments he was face down on the ground. While I was calling an ambulance for him, he regained consciousness, drew a weapon, stabbed me in the lung several times (puncturing the lung) and slashed the rear of the right arm (severing a nerve). An eventful day overall. I'm mostly feeling lucky that I survived, wasn't castrated, didn't lose an eye and that nobody else was hurt. Edit: Please edit this as appropriate if there's anything inappropriate or too graphic.
    1 point
  48. Mark, Leeds is not Tokyo, so you should be fine oiling your blades only once in a few months. I live in a similar climate and I don't oil my swords at all. I have never had a problem with rust. They are all in shirasaya, of course.
    1 point
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