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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/18/2021 in all areas

  1. Well as I mentioned bit earlier this year in a thread in here I have been working on a index of Jūyō items. It has been ongoing for a few years now but now I have the 1st version finished. It took some time as I originally planned to just have old swords (Kotō) in a document (as they are my own personal interest), but then I didn't want to do a partial job, so I took on all of the swords, and finally I forced myself to tackle all the fittings, attachments and kinzōgan, kiritsuke etc. As I typed probably few hundred thousand kanji characters in by hand the project took a while. Now this should have all of the Japanese characters that appear in the index pages, and I have written smith / school etc. into Western characters, followed by Japanese characters. However I am not yet comfortable enough trying to translate the style of fittings, kiritsuke-mei, kinzōgan-mei etc. as I would make too many errors so for those you have the Japanese text that I typed in. The format in this should be very simple to follow. It is the same as in my last index (Kokuhō, Bunkazai, Bijutsuhin). 691 pages, 66. Jūyō sessions and 14792 items (if I added them up correctly). Hopefully the PDF will be easily readable (it should be searchable too). Now as this has been a solo project spanning over a long time period, there must be some errors in there that I have made (there are definately some in rare fittings makers as fittings are not really my thing and sometimes I found 0 results with Google on some of the mei). If you spot some errors, send me a message and I will fix them for next release. I plan to make a yearly updates after NBTHK releases the session results. Might be bit boring stuff as it is just lots of pages with plain text. I hope some will find this enjoyable and can find some help in personal research etc. Juyo Index.pdf
    8 points
  2. I'm a big fan of these tiny small scenes. Btw the patination looks very good too. Nice piece Stephen. I have one with a similar scene.
    3 points
  3. Karusk Recently I have been following a Japanese word of advice from Dōgen Zenji for begging Buddhists monks. If I like something I say so, otherwise I keep quiet. I especially avoid giving opinions on things for sale which are often between members. (Seen the trouble that gets kicked up only too often.) If necessary, especially if asked directly, I might send a pm with my personal opinion, but personal opinion is all it is. Life is short, and it takes all sorts, and some folks are fragile, some are difficult, and some are actively looking for a fight. It sounds like your heart and mind are generally in the right place. Hang in there.
    3 points
  4. Well, if the tsuba can cover a "loose" cut, then its practical, other considerations is if it's comfortable to hold it in a sword or if can fitt well in any koshirae. I know I'm very weird, both here and in Japan, and such legends like Torigoye will hate me if was alive...but I think tsuba from Edo period (or even Momoyama) could consider a work of art independent from the nihontō, and could appreciate and delight like a painting. Also I must admit that I'm a kinkō lover, and an Edo period lover, as I'm also a Barroque lover regarding Western art.
    3 points
  5. A friend has a wakizashi by this smith, Masatsugu. He reckons Masatsugu produced very good work. Just phoned him with your questions, and he says this line of smiths were probably brought to Okayama by Kobayakawa after Sekigahara, probably from Kai-Mihara. They worked below the walls of Okayama Castle. First generation signed Masanari/shige. Second gen. signed Masatsugu Third gen. signed Masamori. When Ikeda Mitsumasa moved over from Tottori, he probably removed Masamori from the residence which had originally been granted to them by Kobayakawa. Although very little of this is written down anywhere, this is the fruit of my friend's research. He thinks that the yari and naginata smith Masanao of the Kai school in Mihara is also related, from the similarities in the way they cut their Mei. Oh, he also added that they seem to have worked in close collaboration with the main body of smiths east of there in Bizen. Apologies if any of this is mistaken. Just what I heard, or thought I heard over the phone!
    3 points
  6. Hi Dale , it is in the catalogue of an exhibition held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery in 1964 entitled Arms and Armour of Ancient Japan . Robert Haynes was one of those who put the exhibition together. Ian Brooks
    3 points
  7. Won the Jakushi 8.4x7.7 I especially like the fleet of ships off in the distance. Deciding factor on going for it. Not the normal Jakushi i think of when looking at ther school.
    2 points
  8. i have a polished NBTHK Hozon wakizashi attributed to Mihara (so Koto) for $1100
    2 points
  9. Bob Benson and Ted Tenold (legacyswords.com) Both can be found online.
    2 points
  10. Yes even a nihonto will stand this abuse. Modern nbthk tamahagane has nothing to do with bad steel. If you can tell me why any other steel should be better for swords pls educate me. I get some babu flashbacks now :D To the topic the seller has sold 6-8 blades since the one in the start of this thread. And from a far they looked the same but where different. A hira; shinogi and Shobu zukuri and 2 yoroi doshi and one osuraku zukuri. I don’t even get what you talk about when you say he relisted it.
    2 points
  11. Image that. Japanese seller. Glad it's iron! The tsuba in hand is much nicer that sale photos. So happy anyway.
    2 points
  12. Hi Jason, and welcome to the Board I think you would get better results if you outlined what it is that you would like to purchase. "Any" covers a $500 late Muromachi wakizashi and a $500,000 late Heian tachi masterpiece. You could also indicate your budget, otherwise you will waste people's time. Besides, we have a dealer section here. All dealers in this section are known to and valued by the community. There is also a sales section for private individuals. You had better start with those two. Good luck!
    2 points
  13. Use has very little to do with the study and preservation of Nihonto. This discussion doesn't belong here.
    2 points
  14. I wasn't going to get into this because it opens a bit of a can of worms... but oh well. There are a heap of oddities around pattern 5 swords. I have one of these, as Trystan somehow remembered! Mine has number 297 (pretty sure or maybe 2X7?) On the saya. However, it does have a serial number on the blade, very faint. 300103 I'm guessing. Last number is half stamped but 3 is likely. It's in the Jinsen font too. To head off the question, no it is not a pattern 6 blade in pattern 5 mounts. I can't quite tell... maybe a single stamp on the fuchi... it's at the point I can't differentiate between a dent and dust or a stamp. Now... I also have another example with no marks at all on the blade, but the serial number on the saya is 251125. No arsenal marks I can find. So not quite fitting the what Tristan has, but probably from around the same period.
    2 points
  15. Pretty mindblowing Jussi. The amount of effort is staggering. I'll add it to the downloads section and make you the author, so anytime you have any update or correct you are able to replace the file yourself. The Nihonto community thanks you.
    2 points
  16. I re-looked at the pictures and I would like to point out that the bottom of the scabbard has been sanded down. This was possibly done to address the rust issue in this area. Another comment while I am at it, one can distinguish between spray paint and regular paint with a simple test. Just take a q-tip and soak it in strong alcohol and dab it on the paint in an area that you are not concerned about. Spray paint will easily come off while regular paint will be more resistant. I say this based upon personal experience.
    2 points
  17. Kyryl, you go up on top of the page to NIHONTO INFO. When you click on it, you will see RESEARCH. Clicking on that brings you to NIHONTO KANJI PAGES, and then further to KANJI FOR MEI. It is very helpful and easy to use, I think.
    2 points
  18. I have been slower than usual promoting the show due to uncertainties with covid. I spoke with the Hotel today and they are optimistic (99% sure) I can have the show this year. States all around Illinois are opening up and they are waiting for the Governor to rescind some restrictions so they can have events like ours. I am not as sure as they are but i am cautiously optimistic. As soon as i know for sure i will update the website immediately (www.chicagoswordshow.com). In the meantime I want to share this update as I have been getting a lot of inquiries about coming to the show. It seems there is a lot of pent up demand for a show. Please note: If anyone does not feel comfortable coming, i understand completely. There will be NO pressure from me to attend the show. Everyone's health comes first. If we do have the show I will enforce all health requirements and if anyone does not want to comply please stay home. That being said I am working with the hotel and hope to use the large Ballroom on the mail floor to allow social distancing and better ventilation. I will update the website as we get closer. I would recommend you make hotel reservations if you plan on coming, they can be cancelled if we don't have the show. Here is a link. https://www.hyatt.com/en-US/group-booking/CHIRW/G-JASW?src=envision_email_grpreserv_ENG_20201030_GroupBooking_TC000000170A000007762ENG_G-_28798 You can also click the link to reserve on my website. I have a list of those who had tables reserved for last year's show (and those who paid and asked me to to apply it to next year).I will hold everyone's tables. Do not send money for table(s) until we know for sure. As nothing is settled yet you are welcome to contact me but i won't have firm answers until the State relaxes the meeting limits. I will post changes/updates immediately on the website. I attached a flyer you can print in case you can share it with others. Fingers crossed Mark Jones
    1 point
  19. I found this interesting. I was cleaning this blade getting ready to photograph it prior to sending it off for polish & found the original polisher had scratched in his name. I believe it is Masa ____ & possibly Saku? any help would be appreciated. Of further interest to the Gendai collectors in the group: The blade is signed Baba Akitsugu who also signed Baba Tsugukiyo. He was an RJT Smith making mid to high grade Nihonto. This blade was made in 1936. I don't know the reason for the switch in names. This blade was made as a dedication to a shrine and is inscribed as such. Perhaps Akitsugu was the name used when not making military blades? Jim
    1 point
  20. Hum.. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/3788/64685ec4e78c9d63973ce0cc916f44152aa0.pdf?_ga=2.201074286.1307484759.1616071515-1827659494.1616071515
    1 point
  21. Just a reminder. If a signed bigger or big name and coming out of Japan with green papers, then probably you should pass on it. If anyone can correctly identify the tsuba I am talking about, you get a gold star. No need to import junk.
    1 point
  22. Dead giveaway: damascus-esque patterned steel, not Japanese in the slightest.
    1 point
  23. Sorry this is a Chinese replica , trying to be a Japanese sword.
    1 point
  24. I have found (after being tipped in that direction from someone) that acetone is a good test. Modern paint comes off with less rubbing than does the war era paint. In fact, the one time I tried removing the mottled-green, I gave up and used a dremmel wire brush. But with my late-war 95, with bad gold paint, it came off with the acetone.
    1 point
  25. This place isn't a competition for likes. There's Facebook for that.
    1 point
  26. Took a couple with different angles of the light. Good practice anyways. And some better of the design of the saya cover(if someone knows the proper term educate a fool please, sword bag just feels....wrong)
    1 point
  27. Well, it's a little unusual, but certainly convenient and possibly even safer. The question might be whether this was done in Japan or in the States. Could you show a clear photo of the Mei, with the Nakago tang pointing towards us? My neck is not too good at this twisting stuff!
    1 point
  28. I am unsure if this PDF article has been posted before, it dates from 2012 Samurai-Evolution-of-Arms-Armors (2).pdf
    1 point
  29. I'm very interested to see that the tsuba has a teppou on it, though I can't make out the object that is in front of the barrel or what the other objects are. I'm guessing that the back of the tsuba might show a bag for keeping lead balls. On the front I seem to remember a story here some time ago of a samurai shooting a bird in some circumstance?? BaZZa.
    1 point
  30. It's clear why we are so interested in nihonto! Johan
    1 point
  31. Just received these beautiful oshigata by Hon’ami Kōson (本阿弥光遜). Very pleased with these, as photographs don't give one the depth of Kōson's drawing. I suppose it is the next best thing to having the swords themselves John was a pleasure to deal with, and everything arrived promptly and very well packed. I even got some excellent reference books from John for my already crowded library in addition to the scrolls. And for those interested, the blades depicted are by Tanba-no-kami Yoshimichi (丹波守吉道), Shodai I presume?, and Ko-Bizen Masatsune (古備前正恒). Anyways, thanks again John!
    1 point
  32. Here, i think i got a handle on making it show up. I appreciate the interest
    1 point
  33. The brown i see at the drag is what i believe to be 'rust'. It hasn't been confirmed as paint or anything else at the moment. I DID NOT see Brown paint. Here i will quote myself from post#3, where i was asking the question: Clifford is lucky in having providence via family history and has confirmed that the sword had a black saya from about 1949/50. This is from his Mothers recollections. Now Three possibilities exist: 1-Genuine Black saya from Arsenal. 2-Period War repaint, either at Arsenal, or in the Field of battle (which is generally more obvious as such.) 3-Post War repaint - (upto 1949/50)possibly done by his grandfather for reasons unknown, but not a common practice so soon after the war i would think, but not unreasonable. Not one of these has yet been proven, but more to the point, neither have any been disproven. Now with the question of Black paint being used on Scabbards. Firstly it was used on the type32 production, and is found on Type98 and 97's, so why is it a definite NO for type95's????? Now i know everyone has a view on this, but in fairness lets be honest and not misquote to further our cause. Here's the 1943 weapons Camouflage manual thread posted by Nick at Warrelics, which is the main source of this: Japanese-armys-1943-weapons-camouflage-manual In post #10, i asked about black being used for camouflage purposes, his response in post#11 was NO, the manual denies this possibility, but this is in reference to 'Camouflage' only. This statement rather only denies possibility 2 -in the field, at the time of the manuals release. The option of an Arsenal produced black scabbard is not part of the scope of the document. Then in relation to provisional launch documentation of 1935, he only uncovered that issues existed with the actual paint finish itself (black was not specified here) The level of Gloss and general paint durability inparticular, made them think about scabbard covers as an alternative solution, and he goes on to say-' This is in 1935. Yet observations of type 95 swords (which began production in 1937, 2yrs after the initial mandate) show that the Tokyo Arsenal, used a matte black whereas, Nagoya after 1943 had used a gloss black in some limited production, both used other colors of course. These observations include all three of the possibilities mentioned prior. Nagoya's use of Gloss, contradicts the manual, however, it's worth noting that one is a production environment, while the other being the manual, refers to the field environment with camouflage only in mind. It's also worth noting that Option 3 - post war repaint, particularly one which targets Nagoya swords ONLY, is highly unlikely. Care must be taken not have a conclusion by hand picking data which suits, but to consider all data before making any conclusions. Back to the original sword in this post. The texture of the paint is interesting and understandable now. If it is not too much trouble Clifford, could you please post some close up photos of the scabbard drag, its sides and around the throat/hanger area please. A great piece of family history you have!
    1 point
  34. “国友” (Kunitomo). Like Jean already pointed out.
    1 point
  35. Jean already did it for you
    1 point
  36. About Mino Senjuin more precisely Akasaka Senjuin from Nihon Koto shi : Fujishima (same book) :
    1 point
  37. 正真 武州住千住院源守正作 寛文 長壱尺伍寸参分有之 Shōshin Bushū-jū Senjuin Minamoto Morimasa saku Kanbun Nagasa Isshaku Gosun Sanbu ari kore True signature Bushū-jū Senjuin Minamoto Morimasa saku Kanbun (era) Length 1 shaku, 5 sun, 3 bu
    1 point
  38. Hi, The Poem: かへりみよ、これもむかしは花、すすき(薄)まねきしそで(袖)のなごりなりけり。 Meaning(free translation): When living, she(bone) was a beauty like a flower. But Japanese pampas grass is fluttering in the wind like sleeves of her Kimono now.
    1 point
  39. 正輝 研(Polish)
    1 point
  40. Which is called shinai 竹刀
    1 point
  41. Help on FB by James Lancel McElhinney Nice later Jakushi guard. My thoery os that many of those Nanga subjects allude to the arrival from China of Ingen Ryuki, the mentor of Jakushi's painting teacher Shoyu Itsunen, and the founder of Obaku Zen Buddhism. Some of Kawamura Jakushi's paintings bear calligraphy by Ingen Ryuki. Jakushi I was a samurai painter. It seems that Jakushi II was a contemporary of his, a metalworker and thus of lower social status. Shiraki Kizaemon (J2) executed J1's designs. Similar to Yagyu & Kariganeya. J4 (son of J2) stayed into the more commercial realm of macho-bori taste, but the later generations went back to J1 designs. Stephen Christensen Those are from the era of J4; Shiraki Chouemon. The Jakushi atelier seems to have had close ties to the Kiyou-Toujin-Yashiki (Nagasaki Chinatown). J4 stared making Kinai style dragons, with spalshy gold overlay. He also explored more openwork in his designs, which abandined the links with painting. J1 designs are almost all based on paintings. J6-8 went back to the old design-book, but also reproduced painting images, including windswept bamboo, based on Zenga by Kumashiro Yuhi, and traditional J1 Nanga sansui landscapes. Tsuba collectors who only look at tsuba are missing half the story. Many guards are based on paintings, prints and textiles. "Nanako" for example is a specific weave of silk that looks like fish roe. One must study all the arts to understand how tsuba fit into the story.
    1 point
  42. This lead insert and new mekugi-ana has always intrigued me. (not my latest blade anymore).
    1 point
  43. Thank you very much Klaus.
    1 point
  44. Dear John. Found the reference after a bit of head scratching. Christie's, June '95. The lot numbering is a bit hay wire for these lots but it is lot294. Signed Masamune and dated 1329. They describe the habaki as, ".. carved with clouds and integral to the blade", which I presume means they couldn't get it off. The listing goes on to say, "Pseudo archaic blades were not uncommon in the Meiji period......made by smiths such as Miyamoto Kanenori and Hayama Enshin among others." All the best.
    1 point
  45. I happily own a wakizashi by the same smith! Absolutely lovely, the way yours was mounted.
    1 point
  46. Greetings sword friends! Although I realize this announcement may only be a source of frustration due to limited travel opportunities, I still believe it is worth mentioning. Residents of Japan certainly still have an opportunity to make a pilgrimage to the Japan Sword Museum. If you have not been to the new facility, it really is spectacular. The lighting on the swords is well-done and the swords come alive... well not exactly dancing but the impact is strong and the features are visible. Of newly designated Juyo on exhibit there are thirty-six blades, eight koshirae, and thirty-seven fittings. Of the seven swords I submitted to the Juyo Shinsa in 2020, belonging to myself and my clients, three received Juyo designation. A few of the swords I sold to clients in the past year also made Juyo this year. One of the swords I handled for restoration was selected for the exhibition (as not all new Juyo blades are put on display). It is a first generation Tamba No Kami Yoshimichi owned by my friend and client, Matt Jarrell. Polished by Mr. Dodo of Hiroshima, it is something to behold. Most of you are aware how difficult it is to get Juyo designation for late Koto, Shinto, and Shin-shinto blades. Congratulations to Mike Yamazaki as two fittings in his name are also included in the exhibition this time. Please see the attachments in the next posting for the translated list of exhibits.....files are too large to attach here. The exhibition runs from February 27th through to April 11th. If you plan on visiting the museum, budget some extra time to explore the beautiful former Yasuda Family garden. The ground floor lounge of the museum building looks out onto the garden and pond. You can sip a tea while looking out over the pond..... It will do wonders to calm your spirit...while you meditate on sharp steel... or shakudo fittings.... 66th Juyo Exhibition.pdf
    1 point
  47. It sold for around $3K? You can be VERY sure it is VERY gimei.
    1 point
  48. I dont know if they are chinese, but the hada looks to good for the chinese work. Who ever made these swords he know what he do.
    1 point
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