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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/15/2021 in all areas

  1. Won't crucify you...but will say that is bad advice. They sell dross....stuff that has no market in Japan and has little to teach anyone. I daresay you can do much better on this forum. Our members offer far better stuff at better prices, if you just watch carefully for a while.
    4 points
  2. Dear friends, I hope you'll find interesting the following article I published last year and translated just yesterday. https://www.academia.edu/45515176/Study_on_the_monetary_value_of_Japanese_swords_and_their_fittings_during_the_Edo_period_1603_1868_
    3 points
  3. 3 points
  4. Yesterday I did a computer update on my Dell Laptop. Usually I ignore the tour that comes with the update. Since this was a big update I looked at them. The interesting feature that is available in Word, Excel and PowerPoint is that if you highlight a word or phrase and right click your mouse and choose translate you can select both the original language e.g English and the language to translate to e.g. Japanese. You could also translate from Japanese to English. Any of our members who are not English speakers can translate from their native language to English. Try it out!
    3 points
  5. NMB for your viewing pleasure I present my Shin Gunto collection. All the blades except for the Mantetsu in the middle are coated with Renaissance Wax. Any suggestions on what type/model I should be looking for next? Any suggestions for displaying the saya better? I'm rather limited by space.
    2 points
  6. This might make it a little easier. Sometimes the inverse makes thigs clearer, In the older version of NMB you could put two images side by side.
    2 points
  7. JP, a Hozon paper is often all some older / top collectors in Japan bother with. It has served its purpose to verify what the owner thinks and beside that, if the owner is confident and experienced, the attitude could be: “why bother / I know what I have and I know it is outstanding.” To be honest, oftentimes it is vanity and ego which motivate us, sometimes it is a monetary imperative. There is another aspect: sometimes Japanese collectors are secretive and do not wish others to know what they have. And since the NBTHK publishes the names of the submitters, and in the past - of the owners, this could become uncomfortable to some people. So they prefer their treasure to be “secret”, unpublished in the Juyo/ TJ Zufu. Some years ago, I decided to have few but decent blades. That necessitated culling my already modest collection of 4-5 items to 1 only, before building it up to the current 3. It all depends on what collectors want and like.
    2 points
  8. They aren't that terrible. Most of us did far worse.
    2 points
  9. This is the first time that I read the relationship of nanako and silk weave.
    2 points
  10. More pics. This one side by side with a standard type 19 dress saber. Also the LWG is slightly less heavy than a standard type 98. I’d guess maybe 1-3 lbs lighter.
    2 points
  11. I believe it is Teruhide - 輝秀 WWII era smith.
    2 points
  12. Yes im posting on a old thread. Ill take my lashing with wet bucatini noodle please. If this is not saved to files or pin perhaps it would be considered.
    2 points
  13. Some rubber or foam tube for the hooks.
    2 points
  14. I've had this sword for about 2 years, and I've had a few people tell me its this and that, and I dont really know. So i feel like anyone on here will know more than me. (I can get better pictures if you need) Also worth noting that I'm completely new to this site and to collecting nihonto, only been doing it about 2 years and I've done a little research on each buy, but who knows if it is good research, that said, I'm eager to learn.
    1 point
  15. https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/photographs-of-Japanese-sword-guards-1916
    1 point
  16. Indeed yes I have posted that one before!
    1 point
  17. I don't know if its a manufacturer's mark, or a kamon. It's the character 本 (hon, moto = origin) written in a seal-script type font. As a kamon its called maru-ni-hon-no-kakuji (angled character "hon" in a circle), but yours looks more like a maker's mark to me. Here is a link that shows the kamon https://www.akinofont.com/shop/item_detail.php?mode=_ITEM_DETAIL&i_xid=4815
    1 point
  18. That is a good plan JP. It will be a long save but think about 5+ years in the future if you manage to stick with the plan.
    1 point
  19. I think vanity really is a motivation here. I mean, who can be honest and not be happy to say: " hey, this sword is 700 years old and was made by @#%&=$ and was in the hands of 2#$&43$” ?" Better for the ego than a mumei John Doe sword made during Genroku, eh? That's why I don’t put much interest in papers, that and, let’s be honest, they are more expensive. Still, I believe a beautiful, mumei sword by John Doe, even suriage, is still a beautiful sword. So that sword above may not be what it claims to be,, it is still a very nice sword. As for the other part of the quote, I’m finishing paying for some books and the armor I’m buying then plan to put 500 euros in the bank every month until I have enough to get what I want (my dream? Bizen Ichimonji, but that will probably be never possible to achieve). As for selling swords? No way. Those are part of my history. When I take them in my hand, from the most humble one to the most prestigious, it reminds me of the day I got them. That memory is more precious than any sword.
    1 point
  20. That’s what I’m doing, Michael. My next sword won’t be before a few years, though I’m pretty sure I can’t afford such a beauty without selling my house, both kidneys and forcing the kids I don’t have into prostitution! Still, I’ll be getting a nice one in the far future, although to be honest, I don’t give a damn about papers. They’re just good if you want to resell. Besides, since TH and Juyo will forever be out of my reach, a simple Hozon will do.
    1 point
  21. My collection is missing a naginata, so i started looking for a descent one. Horimono ( especially bonji ) are very welcome. Time period -> the older the better. Budget -> ~5000$ Not looking for a specific school. Offers are welcome. Show me what you got! Greetings
    1 point
  22. Dear Jeremy. Apart from the very early chokuto the orthodoxy is that swords with such shallow sori, assuming they are ubu, developed during early to mid Shinto as a response to changing demands in time of relative peace and the rise of schools of swordsmanship using shinae. In this context they re not symbolic but associated with a style of swordsmanship. As you suggest the sugata was revived at various times subsequently, including the so called royalist swords of the Shinshinto period. Once again this was connected to swordsmanship rather than being symbolic, the political allegiance of the domain where the style was popular leads to the connection. Sori alone is not a reliable guide to period as other factors in the shape of the blade are significant; kissaki, taper and so on. I am not sure that any of this answers your question but I am sure that others will add to this. All the best.
    1 point
  23. The issue was recently discussed in this thread. It would seem that newer papers don't have the ownership info on the back.
    1 point
  24. Jan, the photos do not allow to read the signature of the TSUBA correctly, but it may read ECHIZEN KINAI. If so, it could well be a genuine TSUBA which was silver coated in the recent past to match the other parts of the mounting. That may indeed be the work of an amateur as Brian suggested. Except for precious metals, all other metals usually were patinated. Silver can appear as bright metal if the design required it, e.g. to represent the moon. The lacquer work cannot be judged by photos, I am afraid. Modern SAYA usually have printed on decoration which looks very even in magnification. Traditional lacquerwork looks different. As Stephen suggested, a look into the KOI-GUCHI might reveal more (to an expert who can compare). I like the shape of the blade very much, so I hope for you that it is the real deal! I should say that the criticism vs. your KOSHIRAE is just a 'technical' or artistic one, and you should not feel bad about us pointing out weak features of it. This should not keep you from liking it, but as most of us, you will be in a learning process which will change your view the more you see and compare.
    1 point
  25. Stephen - I did the complete illustrated edition of the Georg Oeder collection back in 2017 it has been on the book market since then, with 213 illustrated tsuba and a collection of 48 tsuba from the Baron of Biegeleben a minister of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria [whose assassination caused the outbreak of WWI] All translated from the original German into English. The link to the public domain photos has only 45 in total, but it is a good primer for the collection - all of which has 'gone missing' since the Russians took Berlin in 1945. This was the main reason I did the book, in hopes that someone might recognize any still existing pieces. https://www.amazon.com.au/Japanese-Decoration-ornament-collection-Dusseldorf/dp/1364114488 https://www.dymocks.com.au/book/Japanese-sword-guards-and-decoration-and-ornament-in-the-collection-of-georg-oeder-of-dusseldorf-1916-by-d-r-raisbeck-9781364114480 https://www.booktopia.com.au/Japanese-sword-guards-decoration-and-ornament-in-the-collection-of-georg-oeder-of-dusseldorf-1916-georg-oeder/book/9781389339271.html https://www.ebay.com/p/240673898 https://www.abebooks.com/9781389339271/Japanese-Sword-guards-Decoration-ornament-1389339270/plp
    1 point
  26. The metal piece around the throat of the scabbard is also unique. On my standard type 98 the metal piece only goes around the outside of the throat of the scabbard. On the LWG the metal piece goes around the outside and over the top (excluding the hole for the blade.) Hope that makes sense. Thought it was important to point out.
    1 point
  27. These guys will all probably crucify me for this. I recommend you buy yourself something cheap from daimyou54eb on ebay to study in hand before buying anything expensive. By cheap i mean under 1k$. They handle low end stuff that wont receive a paper but its all guaranteed nihonto as he is in Japan and the laws governing swords there are very strict. Dont pay full price he always accepts offers. It might have a crack or some rust but having the real thing in your hand will help you avoid some costly mistakes in the future. It wont be worth exactly what you paid in Japan or anything, but it will be worth more than that abomination.
    1 point
  28. Hello all, I am here mostly to learn the proper approach to the Japanese sword so I most likely will be reading more than posting I have a few interesting examples from different eras that have to be discussed but I will do so when I am ready to participate actively rather than just ask.. Great to be here - cheers John
    1 point
  29. Yes, mine is 1.05in (26.7mm) at the edge of the habaki. At the yakote: 19.05mm Bohi begins: 2.9mm from mune and is 7.38mm wide.
    1 point
  30. Richard - The way it works now is the Museum sells its excess to collectors [or investors] they grow old and die leaving their collections to the Museum who sell them on - ad nauseam. Hell why not lease the lot out! How much money for hanging "Self portrait with a Straw hat " by Vincent van Gogh, or 'Washington crossing the Delaware" on your wall for a week? Where does it ever end - - with an empty building that still needs to be maintained. Sorry but the almighty dollar should not dictate what is or is not worth preserving. The interest rate at the moment on that 3.3 Billion is 6.4 Million a year approx - that should employ a lot of people.
    1 point
  31. I measured the blade and it appeared to be exactly 0.9 inches. I attempted to poke out the menuki but couldn’t get it to budge. One side of the menuki Ana is covered by the ito wrap. I was able to move it a little but the ito wrap is so tight and fragile I would rather not futz with it for now. ps. Any one know what clan the mon is?
    1 point
  32. Looks to me from 2020...
    1 point
  33. You got it right, but I think Enpō 8 converts to 1680. August is correct. Bear in mind there is not a one-for-one equivalence here as the historical Japanese calendar is slightly different from the gregorian calendar. And yes this says 吉辰 at the end, which is pronounced kisshin, and means "lucky day". (←This I discovered just today. Apparently its not as uncommon as I thought, and I can find several examples on the internet with just a casual search... which goes to show you learn something new every day). https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHBD_jaJP935JP935&sxsrf=ALeKk02shewXOzXkS9MRKdd0cdXRik7Qpw%3A1615737453013&ei=bTJOYOALnLzQ8Q-3rpaQCg&q=吉辰とは&oq=吉辰とは&gs_lcp=Cgdnd3Mtd2l6EAM6BwgjELADECc6BAgjECc6BAgAEEM6BggAEAQQJToCCABQ8nxY35oBYKidAWgCcAB4AIABzgGIAYQHkgEFMS41LjGYAQCgAQGqAQdnd3Mtd2l6yAEBwAEB&sclient=gws-wiz&ved=0ahUKEwig9r6Hk7DvAhUcHjQIHTeXBaIQ4dUDCA0&uact=5
    1 point
  34. Probably you already know it https://library.si.edu/digital-library/book/hamonshu It is a three volume book about waves design. Regards Luca
    1 point
  35. The picture at the top contains a patriotic slogan, the first word of which is being covered by the habaki. It should say 七生報告 一撃必殺剣 Shichishō Hōkoku Ichigeki hissatsu-no-ken The top line means roughly, "Though I may die seven times, I will rise again for my country". It is a common slogan found on wartime items. The second line means "Sword that will slay the enemy with one strike". The bottom picture contains the swordsmith's name 頭山満翁邸内 笠間一貫齊繁継作 Toyama Mitsuru Okina teinai Kasama Ikkansai Shigetsugu saku The swordsmith is Ikkansai Shigetsugu. You should be able to find information on him in this site. A very collectible item, I would think.
    1 point
  36. On the display, I'd put white cloth under each of the blades. It's a respect thing, and it will prevent metal-to-metal scratches and electro-driven rusting.
    1 point
  37. 於三島 - In Mishima, 守谷宗光作之 - Moriya Munemitsu made this. 昭和十九年六月日 - Showa 19th year, 6th month
    1 point
  38. Kind ladies and gentlemen. This tsuba is still available as above mentioned sale fell through at the last moment and and as I'm in kind of a bind I will kindly consider offers. Though not a tosogu expert or collector per se I'd like to add tsuba in this condition are not too common and I have found it a worthwhile piece to study and admire. Thank you. Boston museum example added for interest.
    1 point
  39. Hi Cerjak, your helmet is, strictly spoken, not a "Bajo Jingasa" (see example below)! For the time being, you could call it "鉄八枚張陣笠" (Tetsu 8 maibari Jingasa)....
    1 point
  40. No, it's not a strong indicator that it has been suriage and you can see this kind of bo-hi (called ryo-chiri or kata-chiri) on Shinshinto swords (thery are rare on Shinto but some times seen on blades of Horikawa, Tadayoshi schools or by Hankei). https://www.tsuruginoya.com/items/f00183.html https://www.aoijapan.com/katana-teme-otsuka-kazunobu-kun-sekido-unju-korekazu-seitan-saku-koreansei-5-nen-inu-uma-2-gatsu-hi/
    1 point
  41. I’m tempted to say Nambokucho era, so pretty old and very much shortened. Looks to be a very nice blade. My only concern (but it my just be because the blade is out of polish, and anyway, it is frequent in very old blade), is that the Hamon seem to run pretty close to the ha. I see some togari in the Hamon, so "might" be Mino den.
    1 point
  42. Seems like a pretty nice blade. Could be worth getting professionally polished. The bohi going all the way to end of the nakago is a strong indicator that it's been (significantly) cut down at some point. It's not terribly uncommon. At best, this could be a VERY vague indication of age. I don't think I've seen this on a blade newer than early Edo. Here's a few examples of bohis going to the end of the nakago. https://tokka.biz/sword/norimitsu3.html https://tokka.biz/sword/tadayoshi17.html https://tokka.biz/sword/kiyomitsu6.html
    1 point
  43. Hello Niels, and Alexander I am new to this forum and was interested in your thesis and interest in munechika. I believe the only reliable source about Myochin ki Munechika ( it is the same reading as Munekane, but apparently when he was register as a resident in Edo, he insisted on being registered as Munechika) is his diary ( In Japanese). Munechika was probably the last "official" armor maker of the bakufu, hence this official gift given to the Dutch king. Unfortunately, on the 2 armors that was given, the maidates are missing. The armors left Japan with the Maedate, and there is big chance they reach Holland but for some reasons were lost ( stolen?, storage? war?). That would be an interesting search if there is some document of this period left . Munechika was a well know armor maker, and made armors for both bakufu officials, and individuals ( who could afford his work). His adoptive father and Munechika as well, had some students, and their work are very, (incredibly) similar. In Mr. Ishida book, you have a genealogy of this branch, and students. When Munechika was called by the bakufu to work in Edo, he became extremely famous, and very wealthy. Munechika -'s armor was like having a Hermes bag. It was about status and prestige. He had a workshop, and over the years, I was lucky enough to find 3 sets of his armors with the exact scale size, even the fabric used for 2 of them were identic. 2 of the armors are signed, and the other one ( leather) is not signed, but easy to tell, they were made using the same scales, and from the same workshop. Even the maidate come from the same clan. I do not know why this leather armor is not signed.( Made by one of his student? No sign on leather armors? ) Mr. Ishida who was a specialist of Myochin ( unfortunately passed away a couple years ago), asked Munechika descendant about any left documents from Munechika. They had a lot, but everything was destroyed during the Bombing of Tokyo during WW2. What is left ( for now may be) is his diary, and studying his armors. Signature and date are usually found under the right arm. Some other Sangu parts can have a signature but not mandatory. If it is a full set, you should have the signs in the helmet ( with the date), the mask, and the cuirass ( right arm sign and dates) For "tatami" armors, sign and date in the helmet, sign in the mask, and sign and date on the cuirass, but hidden under the back plate. Of course as an armor maker, he also made some renewal work on damaged armors, made new armors using old helmet for example, etc. I saw an interesting helmet few years ago, but probably not his work. Only the shikoro was signed. Munechika probably only made the shikoro to match the helmet. Sometimes it was a collaborative work, where he did only one part of the armor. Hope it helps. Good luck in your thesis. Would be very interested to read it when completed. Kind regards
    1 point
  44. Based off the dates of the papers that I have this is the best timeline of paper changes that I can document: Date perforations in the upper left were added sometime after March 16, 1994 (as referenced by the paper in the pictures) and before May 1, 2007. The location of the small "日刀保" also seems to have moved around the same time. According to Peitro's post, ownership tracking on the back of the papers existed at least up to June 21, 2009 but was no longer tracked as by February 5, 2014 so this must have changed between these two dates. If anyone has papers that can narrow these dates down more, that would be awesome. E.g. a paper without date perforations dated after March 16, 1994 or a paper with ownership tracking on the back dated after June 21, 2009. This could help create a timeline of changes to NBTHK Hozon papers.
    1 point
  45. The kanji 広 is the simplified form of 廣. They are virtually interchangeable. The process of simplification was accelerated after the war, but the simplified versions existed from before the war. (In other words, its not an error.)
    1 point
  46. OK now I understand: Both of the handwritten columns on the bottom are the date of issue. The date of change would go on the left of 変更年月日, and the name of the second registered owner on the left of the leftmost 所有者名. This clears it up for me, thanks!
    1 point
  47. I see. In the example above the "date of change" is filled but the owner's name is not. Here is an example where the name is filled:
    1 point
  48. Ten minutes on these two sites: https://jisho.org/ https://translate.google.com/ Reveal that the writing on the back of the certificate means: Lower right: 交付年月日 Date of delivery Lower left: 変更年月日 Date of change/modification (?) Top : 所有者名 Owner's name I wonder what "date of change" means in this context. Cheers, Pietro
    1 point
  49. My understanding is that the name on the back is the name of the owner of the blade, or person submitting to shinsa, rather than the certifier. It's sometimes blocked out to preserve their privacy.
    1 point
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