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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/25/2021 in all areas

  1. I enjoy swords and militaria from all nations, but WW2 swords used by the Japanese and their collaborators are my main area of interest. Not purely Japanese in make or art swords. I appreciate these as another fantastic and fascinating part of history, but I prefer general military history over purely Japanese sword history. I enjoy seeing all swords that are posted, find it educational and enjoy the discussions. Differences of opinions are welcome when presented in a constructive and evidence based manner. There has been a great deal of educational material compiled and a number of discoveries due to the tireless efforts of members and those willing to share and research. Thank you all. As a side note, I have a tiny collection of kaskara just because I like them. Not great pieces, not valuable, nor fancy. I buy one every few years if I particularly like it.
    4 points
  2. How about we don't decide for others what they are interested in? Hamish, I'm surprised at you for even doing this. As someone who collects what many Japanese sword collectors regard as mass produced and not art, just weapons....surely you know more than most not to decide what others consider collectible? You made your opinion known. Now it's time to drop it and leave others to enjoy what they enjoy.
    4 points
  3. Those are coming from below. That is one of the better marked examples of the Java-tō. An Appraisal on Some Japanese Swords Please Sword Number 3 marsel (Samusamu) Thank you for sharing pictures of this interesting sword. I am of the personal opinion that these swords were intended for use by Pembela Tanah Air (PETA). The top picture that Shamsy posted above is coming from the Pembela Tanah Air [Defenders of the Homeland] Museum in Indonesia. Possibly you can contact them for more information about those two swords. http://www.disparbud.jabarprov.go.id/wisata/dest-det.php?id=398&lang=id Here is an English link to the same museum. Pembela Tanah Air Museum Keep us posted if you should learn anything more about this sword variation.
    3 points
  4. And how will we know one way or the other, unless we investigate, research, discuss and share?
    3 points
  5. This follows on from a posting made in 2007 where the intention was to show various fittings from my collection for comment/criticision. Due to a long running series of personal and business problems , this never progressed beyond a couple of posts - however , if I can test your patience , I would like to start again. The intention is to post file pictures from across the range , showing the good, bad and indifferent in their current condition . If bettter pictures are requested , I will try to oblige , but this may take a few days. Relevant information about each piece ( where available ) will also be posted , please feel free to add your thoughts... To make a small start - Iron Tsuba signed Edo ju Umetada Masatsugu size 6.9 x 6.3 cm Beautifully shaped , thinner towards centre , very tactile , design of gingko leaves
    2 points
  6. Goto Seijo Seijo, also known as Mitsutoyo, died in 1734. As a school founder, he made only a few tsuba. The other of the school, Seijo-Mitsuzane (died 1750), worked in relief and also made posts in the nunome style. He often used the water kite in his work and happy and beautiful flowers. During this time there was a demand for foreign designs, and this school proved to be many Tsuba in Canton and Namban style. Nidai and onwards used the same signature, 'Seijo'. The sixth Seijo, also known as Harumitsu, Sessai or Shiunchin, was known for its excellent compositions and details. The third to seventh generation worked in Edo, and lived in Shitaya and was known as Shitaya Goto.
    2 points
  7. Hi Tom, It looks like this is a shortened katana but might have been on the cusp between katana and wakizashi length - the distance between the two holes in the tang is a clue to how much has been taken away. Age wise I think this is mid 1600s as the shape looks like that which came into vogue around Kanbun, the era that started in 1661. Back to the reason for shortening, pre-1600 it was likely to be because of battle damage but after 1630 there were no battles so it’s a question of conjecture. It might have been damaged in a fight and so shortened or it might be that the owner needed a short blade and so cut down a katana. It looks like a well made blade with no obvious flaws beyond some fine scratches. That said, it’s probably not made by a significant smith as I think it probably wouldn’t have been shortened without some effort to preserve the signature and the value that would attach to it. I can’t identify the lone kanji that might give a clue to the maker. The fittings look to be mostly utilitarian though not unattractive. The lacquer work on the scabbard is very attractive, however, and some effort has been put into it. My feeling price wise is $1,200 to $1,500 (you may get different views on this) but you can have a look around for similar items to get a better feeling for value. What’s the asking price (if you’re looking to buy)?
    2 points
  8. Hi David, As Michael said, these are tobacco pouch ornaments and the back plate is the "snap" that keeps the tobacco pouch cover closed. The ornament is attached to the back plate through the leather/fabric flap via the two thin wire posts, that's why the plate can be bigger than the ornament (because it is hidden behind the leather/fabric flap). These ornaments are sometimes converted menuki, but we would need to see the backs of yours to know for sure (but based on the looks of the fronts, most of yours were probably not ever menuki).
    2 points
  9. It is such a shame that the photographs of the time can be so hard to make out clearly. The wrap on the sword in the first photograph sure appears to be the same style... but is that a brass tsuba? I just can't make it out. It would be good to see what is on the nakago (if anything) of the sword... should the handle be possible to remove. I'll share what I popped together after a 'Chinese fake' was discovered to be a Javanese sword and people started to share photographs.
    2 points
  10. thank you for all comment, very interesting. this sword found in java indonesia friend try offering me this sword thank you for all opinion, really appreciated. meybe this soldier useing this sword model
    2 points
  11. These reproductions seem to be very numerous, they come in various colours and the quality of the casting varies - but they are not genuine tsuba. https://www.jauce.com/auction/n491403321 It is very common for the facial features to be worn away due to the soft metal alloys used. This last example is a handmade utsushi , you may note there is no signature, but the detailing and hand carving is evident.
    2 points
  12. I am only aware of two examples of the 治-guntō. One of the two was found in the Netherlands. I think more examples would be needed for study to determine if they are real or reproductions. In regards to the markings, I agree that 治 is not an abbreviation for 明治. The Japanese would use 明 and not 治. It is hard to say at this time exactly what the meaning of the 治 character is. Me thinks Trystan needs to find one and show us many pictures of it!
    2 points
  13. Pressure from the allies.
    2 points
  14. You are right Ken, Not provenance and I would never claim that it would be. I personally think it is just interesting info to have.
    2 points
  15. Interesting indeed. To the Westerner, a sword was just another weapon, one that was pretty much outdated when gunpowder got invented. But to the Japanese, the roots go much deeper and it's significance tied to Japan's soul. I read someplace that in the initial surrender and turn-in of weapons, the soldiers weren't expecting to have to turn in their swords. And true or not, I read that the Allies forced them to do it intentionally as punishment, to humiliate them. MacArthur was eventually convinced that if he wanted the Japanese to have spirit in rebuilding commerce, he needed to change the sword surrender policy and let them have some pride back.
    2 points
  16. I would like to get some opinions about this sword from experienced collectors on NMB. Total length is 88 cm Saya 65,5cm, Tsuka 21,5cm Blade 55,5 cm from kissaki to tsuba. Nakago looks like has been shortened and redrilled. Was it a katana before? Is it a common practice? What was the purpose? Some king of damage? Polish doesn`t look like it was done recently. I am curious about this sword, what is the value of this kind of wakizashi? How old it could be? Click twice on picture for better resolution.
    1 point
  17. Mal has treated us to part 2 of his Naval swords and swordsmiths essay/manuscript. Amazing work, and kudos to him and those others who are sharing this sort of info freely. We have an amazing amount of info stored here. Thanks Mal, we all appreciate it!
    1 point
  18. hii meybe this real gunto? no mekugi in tsuka any help would appreciated thank's regards
    1 point
  19. The top retaining brass screw that hooks together the fuchi and the backstrap on yours seems to look more like a rivet than an actual screw as it lacks the slot on the head that all other screws I've seen have. Perhaps a replacement or a sign its a cast piece?
    1 point
  20. I have a fondness for them as well, and you get a lot of sword for your money!
    1 point
  21. I am a sword collector, British, German, Japanese and from all over the place. Nihonto are just one area of my interest,... And Military blades (a big area of collectors interests generally.) another. Military swords sort of crop up when nations put national armies together, and medieval and ethnic collectors accept that this is a different area of collection and go elsewhere, collectors of such do not go onto Military sites and criticise collectors of Prussian Imperial Army blades for example. This sort of criticism seems to be unique to Japanese sword collecting. When Japan decided to "modernise" they took sword production to another place, while recognising and valuing their traditions. Perhaps Japanese sword collectors should do the same. Just saying, German collectors love the late war ersatz products, and respect them as a nation fighting to the end......
    1 point
  22. Bruno I don't think those Gunsui to is at the same level as Mantetsu in any way. I just want to have one of this Company made Gunto from WW2 in my collection, not because of the quality of the blade or smith, just a part of wartime history.
    1 point
  23. The plates could be later additions if the menuki were modified for use on something other than a tsuka (like a tobacco pouch, coin purse, etc.)
    1 point
  24. In the first image, Batto Kwannon + Daikokuten. As Malcom indicated above, I believe the second is Fudo Myoo.
    1 point
  25. Here is some info about the frontside of the papers, that I have grasped from papers presented online. Date perforations were probably added around the beginning of Heisei 7 (1995), as both Hozon & Tokubetsu Hozon papers from Heisei 7 now have this feature. The location of small "日刀保" seems to have changed around beginning of Heisei 9 (1997), as Tokubetsu Hozon from February of that year still have old placement of these but Hozon papers bit earlier in February already had the new placement.
    1 point
  26. This is the signed one I was given by Senju Sensei’s son Sōju. (Wow, that’s a mouthful!)
    1 point
  27. Im in ann arbor, PM sent
    1 point
  28. i am in Toledo OH but will be at a small show this Sunday in Livonia a suburb of Detroit. he can email me at nixe@bright.net or call 419-283-0941 (i am EST). mark jones
    1 point
  29. It was sold for close to $1600
    1 point
  30. On that logic, yes i will come to the party. A non Japanese gunto wasn't what i was debating over
    1 point
  31. Or 為岡氏鍛之 Made for Mr. Oka
    1 point
  32. Hamish I don't think this sword was Japanese-made and issue to Japanese troops either. But, the Japanese and Chinese all called the military sword 軍刀 (Gunto/JunDao). So, It is a Gunto, just not for the IJA.
    1 point
  33. I guess that is why the same sword shows up again and again all the time. Thx Jussi. Now I’ll relax and let you guys rest from my newbie questions and read my first Nihonto book. :-)
    1 point
  34. Thomas Just a thought about the "治" mark Gunto. Many countries call the period under Japanese rule during WW2 日治時期,including 台灣(TaiWan),新加坡(Singapore),馬來西亞(Malaysia)and 印度尼西亞(Indonesia)etc. Is it possible the 治 could be the abbreviation 統治(Ruling)instead of 明治(Meiji) for the arsenal in occupied countries?Or even means the sword for 治安隊(public security force)use?
    1 point
  35. Sorry, missed your post. Knock one of the zeros off that price. They’re having a laugh.
    1 point
  36. The most "fancy" one of my collection. Shakudo tsuba depicting tiger and leopard by Itō Masataka 伊藤正隆 (aka Itō Katsumi 伊藤勝見)
    1 point
  37. It's really interesting that, even as they were losing the war, with dwindling supplies and manufacturing capacity, the Japanese wanted to keep equipping their officers with a symbol like the sword on a modern battlefield.
    1 point
  38. It is Japanese army though, and this site is "militaria.co.za", and this page is titled "Military Swords of Japan", note the recurrent themes of Japanese and military. If it's not your thing, that's OK, you are not forced to join in the conversation. It is a gunto, new to us all, certainly to me, and a late war one and we know that because instead of dismissing it out of hand we did the research, and have added to the pool of knowledge of such. To quote my old Guru, "fight for your limitations, and they are all yours!"
    1 point
  39. John, In the last year of the war, the Allied bombing was doing so much damage to mainland weapons production, including swords, they shipped the production out to China and occupied lands, like Indonesia. The mil specs were loosened to allow expediting production. You can read my quote of Nick Komiya's discussion of this issue here:
    1 point
  40. Thomas, Please let us know what you've discovered. This is groundbreaking news.
    1 point
  41. Hi Everyone I've been a member on here before but I had difficulty logging in with my old account so I've started afresh. My Name is Gethin and I'm from south wales in the UK. a number of the members from the UK should know me as I've been collecting mainly Tsuba for the last 20 years but also have a number of blades. Look forward to continuing to learn from the more experienced members. Thanks again Gethin
    1 point
  42. Amazing! And now they are showing up in the country in which they were made in. The Japanese arsenal was headquartered in Bandung and the commanding officer was Major General Ando Shoichi 安藤・ 正一少将. He was appointed to the position on 1943-09-13.
    1 point
  43. I'm not too proud to admit that I simply didn't know that something which looks like the sword in this thread could be a genuine Japanese gunto. 🤷🏻‍♂️
    1 point
  44. I agree, it is at least a contender and certainly not a Chinese fake. Some people on this site are all to quick to label anything they don't recognise as a fake, I wonder if they get a thrill out of it?
    1 point
  45. Hi Yesterday I recieved my latest purchase. It's a Gendaito signed Toei Ju Ota Chikahide made in August 1940 with a nagasa of 27 3/8". The sword is beautiful in every way(Thanks Stu). It has a lovely hamon with masame and an equally nice hada. When researching the smith he's described as a highly rated smith or a top notch smith. However he's only rated at 1 million yen, isn't that quite an average ranking for a half decent/decent smith. Well either way I didn't buy the sword for the name nor because of the ranking of the smith. I attach a few photos if it could be of interest to anyone. The sword was sold at nihonantiques.com a few years ago and since Moses is a far better photographer than I'll ever be I borrow his. Cheers Daniel
    1 point
  46. Two of mine... Mumei Kodai Umetada and a Tsuba made by Akiyoshi.
    1 point
  47. Glad you guys liked this set. These 2 pics really exemplify the master level work... like George said, the katakiribori is superb, and check out the inlay work on Raijin. The silver teeth, anklets and bracelets, and of course the eyes. I love the bold mei also, along with it being dated. The Taikan has a sketch and an imprint, and the box lid inlay is original from his shop. Photographic credit goes to Ted Tenold.
    1 point
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