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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/02/2021 in all areas

  1. To all who think about this one... Please note: this is a healthy and flawless wakizashi. And it is as good as shinshinto gets - you have an excellent school, the sword is an absolute beauty (look at those choji), it comes with oshigata and of course NBTHK Hozon, all this for a very attractive price. Last not least - Grey is one of the few great gentlemen (old school in the best sense of the word) of the nihonto world. Whoever buys this sword, will be very happy!
    3 points
  2. Zaimei Koto Mino katana.
    3 points
  3. Hi, A recent acquisition I believe to be Mito school, late Edo period. Dimensions: Height - 84mm Width - 79mm Mimi - 5mm Seppa dai - 4.8mm I like the nunome zogan on the clouds and dragon, and the small gold and silver zogan dots on the waves. The dragon has silver claws, a little worn, which is a nice feature. It's a little dirty in parts any advice on cleaning or who could offer this service, given it a little oil, a stiff brush and some ivory rubbing but there's too many intricate areas? I'm calling it a cloud dragon but seems to like the water as well! Have a good new year, hope 2021 is better than 2020!!
    2 points
  4. Bruce 助宗 is not Seki smith.He is 備前國(備州)sword smith.I think he also called 備州長船助宗。
    2 points
  5. Do you’ve checked “尾州住兼武“ (Bishū jū Kanetake)? The part above jū is strange and I’m really not sure...also for the smith. But might be a fair chance!
    2 points
  6. There is a correction thread for this book started by Morita san some years back. I too have found a minor translation error on one of the Kanemasa (Murata) swords. Mr.Slough's Oshigata book. FYI, I have enjoyed reading your recent articles by the way.
    2 points
  7. I agree with Rivkin above. My simple rules are: - several strands parallel to each other: sunagashi (sand strands) - single strand but not passing through habuchi: kinsuji.NB you could have several and multiple kinsuji but in sequential longitudinal hamon parts. - kinsuji passing through habuchi like a lightning: inazuma When the hataraki is longish and composed of nie/konie and does not fit any of the above, I tend to follow the NBTHK and just call them niesuji
    2 points
  8. I will be using this post to share some recent photos. In general these will not be swords that I am offering for sale, but instead will be coming from my collection and those of other collectors who have given approval to share the photos. I have also recently started photographing swords and fittings for auction houses, and some images may come from that source as well.
    1 point
  9. 44.5 cms overall, 22.3 cm blade . Is the maker's name ' Tsugu Fumi Iye' and if so, does anyone know if he is he a known maker ? Scabbard lacquer includes the Yamanouchi mon with two others. All over in good condition. The information about the mon etc came from the vendor. Are the photos adequate as I welcome any and all input. Thank you in anticipation.
    1 point
  10. JP, Best to use the Reply box at the bottom of the page, instead of using quote every time. We don't need the last post reposted every time
    1 point
  11. HA! Sorry Chris! Was in a hurry and had a "senior moment."
    1 point
  12. Very attractive and fascinating Closest I've got - only a kozuka .... But signed Tokuoki - ( Otsuki school ) Please excuse poor quality file pics Best of luck with your search (quest ? )
    1 point
  13. A pretty good consensus laid out here. Sunagashi, kinsuji, inazuma (and while drastically different, sometimes sudare-ba) absolutely kill me - I'm quite drawn to that detail work. Here's an example of a really intense hamon that I've always considered to be fairly extreme with both sunagashi and kinsuji. (but apparently imozuru can apply as well) I always thought of sunagashi as the pattern (akin to 16k's analogy) where you would drag your fingers through sand, and kinsuji as a stark, darker single streak. (Running parallel in the below example.) Sometimes you can only find the sungashi in the right light, with it being very subtle, and other times it absolutely jumps off the surface - kinsuji tends to always be rather apparent, and can appear dark or light depending on lighting. https://www.aoijapan.com/img/sword/2020/20172-4.jpg And this example has very subtle sungashi that can't really be seen in this photo, but the contrasting single line running in the ha and across the yokote, I consider kinsuji.
    1 point
  14. I would call them like you. However, if we follow Michael's rules, the second would be sunagashi. As I said earlier, for me, sunagashi are like sand dunes or ripples near a shore. They are white, There are several of them usually close together (though a single white line is a sunagashi for me too). On the second sword, they are further apart and black. They would be Kinsuji for me. The same type of line starting in the ji and crossing through the Hamon would be an inazuma for me. ohhh! Potato, poteitoo, my head hurts!
    1 point
  15. Yes Üwé, and the narrow oak leaf ‘propellor’.
    1 point
  16. I realised even right now from the post of Barry that we have a Dealer Showcase here in NMB - shame about me Ray, I'm very happy to find you and your stuff here in a own section. Many swords in my collection are owned from you and i was never disappointed. I can fully recommend the service, knowledge and stuff of Ray. Good luck Ray.
    1 point
  17. G'day Guys, What about these examples? The first I would call sunagashi, but the second which occurs in more discrete lines I would call kinsuji, even though there are several running parallel to each other? Cheers, Bryce
    1 point
  18. Thanks for the post Dale. I just bought your two books on tsuba in the Metropolitan museum when looking at this one!
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. Kaneuji - 兼氏
    1 point
  21. This is my listing and the Emura has sold. Thanks for the shoutout, Bruce. This one had great activity. This is a rare, better hamon IMO that Emura did. The other one I have posted has what I typically have seen on Emura examples. I was actually kind of hoping this one didn’t sell. I’m just upgrading, looking for top gendai smiths now - Shigetsugu, Yasunori, Yoshimune, Akihide (and students), Okimasa, etc, etc. preferably polished.
    1 point
  22. There are three impressions of John Slough's book, An Oshigata Book of Modern Japanese Swordsmiths, 1868–1945. The original 2001 white softcover by Slough and two reprints, a 2004 blue hardcover by Slough and an unknown red softcover by Cillo. As far as I know, they all have the same content. I am missing the copyright pages for the two reprints so some of the information below is incomplete. 1. Slough, John Scott. An Oshigata Book of Modern Japanese Swordsmiths, 1868–1945. Rivanna River Company, 2001. White softcover. 2. Slough, John Scott. An Oshigata Book of Modern Japanese Swordsmiths, 1868–1945. 2004. Blue hardcover. 3. Cillo, Livio W. An Oshigata Book of Modern Japanese Swordsmiths, 1868–1945. Publication details unknown. Red softcover.
    1 point
  23. Hi Gabriel, A very light coat of oil on the polished portion of the blade, as is explained in the care & handling I linked to, and you're set. Nothing else is necessary and anything else might do damage. Grey
    1 point
  24. Reid, the picture is not very clear, at least to me. I have the impression that there is a crack in the MUNE area, so not a HAGIRE. Usually the construction of a blade is done in a way that you have a softer, more flexible back and a hard edge. If you protect yourself against a heavy blow of an opponent, you should be able to do so with the back of your blade. This should not cause damage to your blade with probably the exception of a KIRIKOMI. When a crack like this appears, there have likely been inner tensions in the blade. These could result from an unbalanced composition of hard and more flexible components in the early forging stages, or from the hardening (and annealing = YAKIMODOSHI) process, but could as well be caused by an impact in use. In this case, I could imagine that a hacking blow with this blade meant too much stress for the (too hard) MUNE area. Basically, such a KIZU will have to be related with high probabilty to a fault in the production of the blade.
    1 point
  25. It looks like a pretty decently forged shin-shinto sword and a legit rig, however the nakago patina feels a little off (cleaned or something?) and the mei looks like it was carved by someone who never held a chisel and feels like it was added (to my eyes anyway). Interesting. Doug
    1 point
  26. I'd be inclined toward 重氏 Shigeuji... -t
    1 point
  27. Looking forward to the book arriving.
    1 point
  28. Nice sword. I like the quality and the "sunagashi" (swept sand line) in the tip (or maybe it is lightning (Inazuma)...nice. The writing under the habaki is hard to read but the LH column in the upper pic might say SHOWA (part of a date) and the RH column in the lower pic might say OKA... (part of a name - the polisher). Just a guess, but it looks like a gendaito blade, perhaps made for Iaido and then "militarised" for taking to war. Worth keeping, gently cleaning and looking after. Maybe one of our native Japanese speakers can translate the polisher's writing for us? Regards,
    1 point
  29. Gabriel, as far as I know, this is done just for traditional and decorative purposes and has no functional aspect. The same is valid for the area under the HABAKI. In some ("better") swords you can see meticulous work of the polisher there, but this is only revealed when you dismount the HABAKI. Swords that were taken to war were often not (as expected by some collectors) the best of the family heirlooms, but simpler - but not less efficient - blades. The future will show if this applies to your sword as well.
    1 point
  30. Roger, I am afraid that my comment about the blade (without having actually looked at it) may have come across as negative. My intention was general advice, to be prepared for anything, as often a dealer will slip a lesser quality or doubtful blade into a nice Koshirae. Every trick in the book out there. I can imagine someone high up in the Yamauchi/Yamanouchi Daimyo family carrying this in their obi.
    1 point
  31. Mark Jones and family run my favourite sword show. I have over the years purchased many things from Mark - tsuba, fittings, swords etc. Mark is a Director of the JSSUS and its treasurer. Mark and Grey make a great team. They are honest, hard working folks who always bring new material for the collector to see, enjoy and buy. I count Mark among my friends. Mark and Grey both stepped up to support Nihontomessageboard.
    1 point
  32. Fujiwara is a name that has historical, aristrocratic connotations, and so people of importance often claim descendency from the Fujiwara clan. It is very common on swords, but even historical figures, like IeyasuTokugawa, claimed connections to the Fujiwara clan as it gave authority and legitimacy to their administration. It doesn't add or detract from the sword. In this case, its just way of signing a name. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fujiwara_clan
    1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. I purchased a Kozuka from Micheal Krone (Suketaka) in January 2020 during a sale he posted here on NMB. The kozuka has never been delivered, nor have any of my funds been returned. Micheal was first contacted about this in February 23, 2020, he replied wait. On Feb. 24 I received the following: DHL say: package arrived in your country USPS say: Status In-Transit January 15, 2020 at 3:50 am Processed Through Facility ISC NEW YORK NY(USPS) Tracking # is: CY524235865DE After 5 weeks I contacted Micheal again and received the following: Here in Germany i have to open a file at DHL. And these needs again 2 - 3 weeks. Let´s talk again around 6. March. If nothing happens i open the claim at DHL Finally, I was finally able to speak with someone at USPS. So you will know in the future, they informed me that after arriving to the ISC facility (customs) it can remain there for up to 45 business days. 45 business days from Jan, 15th would be approximately March 19th. Nothing to do but wait. After spending forever on the phone I was finally able to speak with someone at USPS. On March 19, I contacted Micheal again to inform him that all items in that container had been delivered.: Micheal, I still have not received my kozuka. Just got off the phone with USPS International tracking. Every item in that container has been delivered. When it say’s arrived in US, that only means the container. It doesn't show individual items. I need you to file a claim. However, as you chose to call it a tie clip and only insured it for $200, you will need to refund the total amount of $342.32. Ed On March 25, Micheal replied: sorry about the delay. Corona.... I will open a claim file by DHL in the next days. After no reply, I again inquired on April 11: Have you filed the claim for my kozuka yet?? I haven't received any correspondence from you in regards to it. It has been 15 days since you told me you would take care of this. You need to let me know something ASAP. On April 13 Micheal replied: i send the claim to DHL. The write it need minumum 3 weeks to get a answer. So please be patient. I´ll back soon as possible. June 5: Michael, I wrote to you a month ago requesting the refund of the payment sent to you in January. As of now you haven't bothered to reply, nor have you sent any updates regarding the claim. This lack of communication is very unsettling. It has been six months I am beginning to feel I am being taken advantage of. I have filed many claims over time and none have taken this long. Please do the right thing and take care of this by returning the money I paid you. Thank you, Ed June 5: Ed, please understand beside to mange my company i can not thing all the time what´s going on with you case. Unfort. the DHL don´t write me too. I have to call them. This i´ve done 5 min. before. The DHL woman tells me the file is still in progress. And she tell me to call again after the 15. June. This i will do and more i can not do at the moment. And i can not pay back any amout because the package was insured by DHL. And they are responsible for a payment in this case. July 22: Micheal, June 15th has past, any update on the claim? No reply. September 12, 2020: Contacted Micheal again. No reply. December 28, 2020: Contacted Micheal again. No reply. The last reply I received from Micheal was on June 5, 2020. Today is January 02, 2021 Never have I heard of any insurance claim taking so long and as my last reply from Micheal was June 5, 2020 I can only assume I will never receive my kozuka or a refund of my money from him. Micheals actions in our transaction have been very unprofessional and untrustworthy. I feel that my options have been exhausted, my trusting nature damaged. My money has been taken and I have only received excuses. Please take note and beware.
    0 points
  35. Yes, he put a value of $200 on the item though I paid more. It is not the monetary value, it was very little. It is the principle.
    0 points
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