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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/16/2020 in all areas

  1. This was the first time I had a hand in sending anything to an NBTHK shinsa. You would be shocked to learn I was fond of a rabbit fuchi/kashira set (shocking!), and wanted an NBTHK opinion on them as non-tsuba fittings are really not a strong area of knowledge for me. Tokubetsu Hozon judgement for Owari was the result. As always, in hand they are better looking and richer in details, but I did the best I could with some pictures. This was the July shinsa, so physical papers should come some time next year.
    3 points
  2. 3 points
  3. I would guess, Dave, simply a matter of exposed metal rusting and painted metal being protected. Because there is often original paint underneath the 95s and the application quite crude, my suspicion is that it is a crude 'field fix'. Type 32 were never painted, so they should be a neater application of the black paint. Some of my 32, all with leather seppa. Top to bottom: Black paint Light metalic blue Deeper.... blue? In the white These are great swords too. Under rated to collect but very well made and relatively cheap. The stories some of these swords could tell. As we were discussing arsenal refurbishment, I've included a couple of photos of number 3. The saya has undergone re-matching twice before. Just an interesting thing to see.
    3 points
  4. It looks like 造兵刀 Zohei-To to me.That blade is in very poor shape.
    2 points
  5. Well I'm sticking with Tenbun but it hardly matters. What you have Andrew is a lovely package in this sword. Good Shingunto mounts in nice condition with a family mon, the silver badge on the hilt fitting. An earlier blade signed and dated. There were an awful lot of Bizen Sukesada smiths in this time and pinning it down to one will be almost impossible. The time frame is fascinating because in most people's eyes it's very early however it corresponds to a time when a lot of swords were being made and not all of great quality. If all this is getting to you then a look here will give you a bit more to go on. https://www.aoijapan.com/katana-bishu-osafune-sukesada/ If one of our members in your area could look at the sword in hand they could tell you bit more but this is a nice sword. Congratulations! Is this your first Japanese sword? If so most of us would wish that out first sword was as good a find. All the best.
    2 points
  6. To me the signature of the smith seems to be - 備州長船祐定作 - Bishū Osafune Sukesada saku
    2 points
  7. 南蛮鐵聖綱 Nanban tetsu Kiyotsuna
    2 points
  8. For sale Tsuba signed Naoaki (直鏡) + kao, full name Hata Naoaki (畑直鏡), who was also a swordsmith and the son of the 1st gen. Shōji Naokatsu (荘司直勝, 1805-1858) and grandson of Taikei Naotane (大慶直胤). All the swordsmiths of the Naokatsu line also produced tsuba, mainly in the Nobuie style, and these tsuba are often characterized by a "melted" surface with a dark smooth patina. This tsuba presents all the classic elements of Naoaki's works, it represents a wheel cart (partally in sukashi) and paulownia crests in vines by engraving. The mimi on left and right sides are engraved with kikko pattern, the typical turtle shell pattern of Nobuie. The patina is dark and smooth and overall the aspect of the tsuba is very "organic" due the melted appearance. Dimensions: 76x72 mm Thickness at seppa dai: 3 mm Thickness at mimi: 5.5 mm Price 850€ plus shipping and Paypal
    1 point
  9. On a small percentage of '98 tsuba, there is an appendage that is a small loop of brass, that is always in the same place. I doubt it has anything to do with a locking mechanism as all the swords have a lock of some kind. The examples here have a push button lock, the other an Iida lock. Can anyone help with identification?
    1 point
  10. Jeremiah, excuse my ignorance, but are these two really a set? I would have expected similar materials!
    1 point
  11. Hello Howard, this type is called ressei-men (mask with fierce expression). Most probably mid Edo and primarily from the Nara region. So we can assume, it might be a work from the Haruta school of armorers... More info available 😉
    1 point
  12. Thank you. I agree, the blade is not looking good. The price I paid reflects this though. In a way, I like the corrosion, pitting, patina etc. on wartime items. It gives me a feeling of respect for the age of the thing.
    1 point
  13. Thanks for bringing here again Bruce. I am no where near as active as I should be over there.
    1 point
  14. It is indeed my first sword of any kind! Been passed down to me by my father who received it from his. Appreciate all the help thus far from everyone! Definitely want to try and find someone in my area (on the east coast) to take an in person look at it and give me as much info as possible as well as a possible appraisal (just for curiosities sake)
    1 point
  15. I cant see the kanji clearly on your photo and tried to make it see. Edit: I delete the pictures because a better nakago picture is shown.
    1 point
  16. Steve, After seeing your "blued" sayas, it made me think about one of my 95s. It's the one with the mottled green paint that I assumed was a bad Bubba post-war job. I had stripped the greens and what remained was a darkened "blue" finish to the steel. After seeing your 32s with that same finish, I'm starting to think this was a regular finish done, for some reason, on some saya. Apparently it wasn't done to all saya, so why just to some? Maybe it was needed for a particular type of top-coat paint that in use for the moment? (I still regret stripping that green paint!) Dave, sorry for taking your thread off-topic!
    1 point
  17. In the past, ancient dagger that had been handed down to ordinary Japanese houses have appeared. The name was "三寅剣 san-in-ken" engraved on the blade. "A gold and silver inlaid sword handed down to the Hatakeyama family of Matsubara Suwa Shrine priests. Blade length 25.4 cm Weight 151.72 g. The inlaid pattern is the four heavenly kings of the Buddha world (多聞天 Tamonten, 持国天 Jikokuten, and 広目天 Komokuten and 増長天 Zochoten), constellations such as the Big Dipper, and the nine-character Mantra. The name of the sword is inlaid in silver on the ridge." 三寅剣 - 信州の文化財 - 財団法人 八十二文化財団 (82bunka.or.jp) I believe that ancient swords are enshrined in old Japanese shrines as the object of worship in a Shinto shrine. It is a sacred thing, so even a priest cannot usually see it.
    1 point
  18. And although less than two Shaku it says 'Katana'.
    1 point
  19. What a gorgeous sword Edward! And that hamon, wow! Very interesting. If the sword was in Europe I would buy it in a heartbeat haha. Cant be bothered with international shipping and +21% import taxes at the moment
    1 point
  20. 26.6 kilos 3.8 cm bore 100 monme 96.5 cm long. I have not taken it apart yet. A very dense and heavy gun , feels much heavier than it is.
    1 point
  21. Artist is Gigadō Ashiyuki (戯画堂芦幸) Actor's name is Arashi Kisaburō Character is 多加ノ太正 鳥井又助 Taga-no-Taishō Torii Matasuke
    1 point
  22. My opinion on black 95 saya being either repainted from an original colour (brown or green) or post war re-painted remains firm, in light of the evidence (and lack of counter evidence). I am remiss to say there have been a few more examples I have not added to the 95 thread. The 32, I would think, are the same. The original swords were clearly 'in the white' and later, some saya were blued or painted. Dawson had a very small sample and also reached that conclusion. That is consistent with refurbishment or field painting. I've never really seen post war black paint on 32s. Probably because books don't list them as 'rare'. I blame the 'rare' reference for all the post war repainted Type 95s. It is something easy to do, that anyone can do and suddenly they have a 'rare' sword to sell for more money. Remember, the key to my theory is that where it is not post war, the black is period, but not original to the saya. Your 32 shows clear signs of patina and age and falls into this category, as opposed to post war fiddling.
    1 point
  23. Hi Mark: Rotate the tsuba 90 degrees and then to see the other owl rotate a further 180. I did that and cropped the photos so that you will see what I saw.
    1 point
  24. “Nōshū jūnin Kanetsune kitau kore” (濃州住人兼常鍛之)
    1 point
  25. Very nice, thanks for the info Greg
    1 point
  26. One of the arms fairs in the UK that I attended, a dealer had a sword from Ewart Oakeshott's collection, an actual Viking sword! Decent condition though not shiny and I got to hold that. I do sometimes wonder what a Japanese polisher could do with one of the better preserved Viking era swords?
    1 point
  27. Hi Dan, In 2018 I unsuccessfully tried to purchase a katana in full koshirae- dragons ( love 'em!) This had kogai and kozuka and was papered- NTHK. Unfortunately the blade was very poor quality and gimei- also NTHK- last Sydney shinsa. If not for the blade I would have paid the sellers price. They do exhist! Cheers Mike
    1 point
  28. It says 石川兼次鍛之 Ishikawa Kanetsugu kitau kore (made by Kanetsugu ISHIKAWA) I couldn't find any references to this smith. Could you post pictures of the actual blade?
    1 point
  29. Perhaps Mandala, Buddhist Wheel?? BaZZa.
    1 point
  30. Genuine made in longquan from masterswordmaker Mr. Sho. You can go on the website of the longquan swordmaker society and download the genuine papers for this sword.
    1 point
  31. Dear Dick. What to say? One argument would be that it's Shinshinto, mumei and therefore a waste of money to polish and paper because you will never add the value of the work to the value of the sword and what are you doing collecting this sort of thing anyway?. My approach would be that it is a fine looking sword in very nice and complete koshirae that is probably the original for the sword. The smith, the koshirae artists and the samurai who commissioned this sword had no idea that their age was passing and this sword is representative of the culture that we all admire. I would want to keep it and enjoy it as a complete sword and I would want to get it polished, fit a new kurikata and cherish it. I should declare an interest, my best sword is a mumei Shinshinto piece in very nice koshirae. A lot of collectors would dismiss both but I have enjoyed mine for forty years and it is probably the very last one I will pass on. If you don't feel like that then I bet that there are quite a few others who would be happy to take on the problem. All the best
    1 point
  32. Bonus peep shots of a Habaki made to order by Mr Katayama, one of the pillars of the sword community in Bizen today. (Also from Saturday’s NBTHK meeting.)
    1 point
  33. Agreed, in full. There are just too many dimensional elements to try to fit an existing set of koshirae & tosogu to a blade. Many moons ago, I managed to kluge something together, but, looking at the assembly a year or so later, it was obvious that I'd wasted both time & money.
    1 point
  34. I know I always say this place is free and will never have a charge to sell or interact here. And I really resisted saying this. But seriously..... I am seeing many sellers who move thousands of $'s of goods through this place regularly, who have never contributed a cent. Or who won't even consider a $30 Gold membership for 6 months. Guys with multiple $2000+ sales who don't even say thanks. There are multiple ways to say thanks in the STORE section above. And then we have others that will send even a single dollar if they do even a $10 sale...and will contribute every time. Those guys...these small handful...are allowing these big sellers the opportunity and privilege to sell. Because those few guys are keeping this place running. Thank you again to the few who are always so generous. To the others, be thankful I don't institute a charge to sell here. And I don't refer to the small guys who sell a tsuba or 2 occasionally or one item a year. or the reputable dealers who contribute a sum every few months or annually as a thanks. I am grateful to all of you. But those who have sold thousands of $'s and never contributed a cent......don't thank me. Thank those that are covering the costs here for YOU so that you can benefit. Just needed saying.
    1 point
  35. It can be exceedingly difficult to find existing Koshirae to match a blade, considering each Koshirae is custom fitted to a sword. Have you thought about having Koshirae made using existing antique fittings?
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. Dear Gordon. From what you have shown us this is, as Jean suggests, a Shinto wakizashi, nothing to do with Emura swords. It has been put together with a koshirae in recent times and apart from the habaki nothing else is of any age. The tsuba has clear casting seams and the lump of metal under the tiger is a bit of a give away. I am sorry if that is bad news for you. If you are thinking of restoration then probably best to get the blade polished and put in shirasaya, the koshirae does nothing for it. Before you start it would be worth showing it to one of our Canadian members if any are near enough, they will see more in hand. Might be worth looking at Takada swords for comparison. All the best.
    1 point
  38. Looks Kanbun Shinto. No doubt that the at least parts of the tsuka aren't kosher, but can't really tell on the tsuba.
    1 point
  39. Gordan, while the blade looks like an authentic Japanese (long) WAKIZASHI (not WWII), the TSUKA is not Japanese. It may be from a cheap decoration sword. The TSUBA is probably not old but also from a IAITO or even decoration sword. To say more, we would need photos of the complete (naked) blade from above and detail shots from the NAKAGO. If possible, it would be nice to see the HAMON as you describe it. Is there any HADA to be seen? Might be difficult in that state of polish.
    1 point
  40. Yep, by passing the flat end of the tassel through the appendage, removing the satute, and knotting around sarute, then refit the sarute it works.
    1 point
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