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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/03/2020 in all areas

  1. I began receiving my first down-votes the last time I commented that a sword appeared to a Chinese fake. However, that is what I see here as well. Elielson, based on the way this mei is signed it unfortunately does not give the impression of being an authentic Japanese sword.
    6 points
  2. Hi Nick, Welcome to NMB. The signature is partially obscured but luckily it's possible to work out who it is (assuming it's genuine): 佐渡(の)掾藤[原宗平] There may be characters before this, but the part that is visible reads Sado (no) Jo Fuji (the first four characters in the line above). Sado is an island off Japan and one of the old provinces. "Jo" is a honorary title equating to a subordinate government official so our guy held the rank of government official of Sado province. Fortunately, there was only one smith awarded this title - Fujiwara Munehira who worked in Hizen province around the Kanbun era (1661-1673) and yes, it is confusing that he had a rank relating to a province in which he didn't live. "Fujiwara" was the name of an old aristocratic family in Japan with whom he probably had no connection, but this it is not unusual for swordsmiths to take the name of one of the old Japanese aristocratic families (Fujiwara, Minamoto, Taira are common) and this doesn't seem to be something that was done officially but done by the smith themselves to add weight to their reputation. His art name was Munehira and again it's usual for swordsmiths and other artists in Japan to take an art name, usually linked to that of their master or instructor and different from their family name. I'm sure you'll get some more comments soon but I hope that this gets the ball rolling.
    4 points
  3. Very brave of Ray and diplomatic. The mei is interesting. There is an example of this mei https://www.fujibi.or.jp/our-collection/profile-of-works.html?work_id=731 in Tokyo Fuji Art Museum "Heki Tsushima Nyudo Chikyu Tsunemitsu" Heki (or could be read Hyoki) Tsushima is in Hokkaido. "Nyudo" could be "entering/living in" but here there seems to be a context of entering Buddhism, and the tosho Tsunemitsu making this in 1698 in Hokkaido at age 73. (my wife read into this for me). However, I would agree with Ray, but to me your sword looks like a very poor copy, almost by someone who doesnt speak the language? Of course thats only a comment on the nakago. Mal further reading...mei has nothing to do with Hokkaido, its about Kyushu. Heki is in Kagoshima and Hyoki, Tsushima is part of Nagasaki. Tsunemistu was born in Shiga pref and went to Edo .
    4 points
  4. https://studyingjapaneseswords.com/2019/09/09/66part-2-of-30-bakumatsu-period-history-幕末時代/ This is chapter 65, the second part of chapter 29, Bakumatsu Period History. This chapter narrates the process of Commodore M.C. Perry brought the diplomatic document to Japan and opens three ports for foreign ships. Please click the link above to go to this chapter directly. Thank you Yurie
    3 points
  5. A beautiful Kantana Kake for 3 swords from the late edo period. Panels front and back have old -age crackle otherwise In excellent condition.
    2 points
  6. Hi Jonas, I'm assuming that your question has not been asked tongue-in-cheek, so I will attempt to give you a serious answer. This is because ANY o-yoroi in existence is either a National Treasure, in a shrine or museum or exponentially less likely, still hidden away in some noble family's kura - they're certainly not floating around on the market, much less online. The real question is if this is even a real reproduction of an o-yoroi because even reproductions made by modern day katchushi have been known to have taken years to make with prices in the hundreds of thousands. I'm not sure what this particular example is (can't make out anything really from the pictures supplied), but it is assuredly not "real". Besides, it's from China - not the bastion of authenticity when it comes to Japanese antiques.
    2 points
  7. My opinion, the tang/sword is genuine based on the nakago there. But the mei is totally false and done by someone who isn't Japanese. Doesn't even look traditionally done. But the sword may be a real one...mumei. Let's see more pics.
    2 points
  8. Hi Jussi , i have those magazines and will drop you a PM . A great project . Regards Ian Brooks
    2 points
  9. While not totally what you are looking for, I've been building a basic Jūyō Index for few years now. I will give it to NMB for free when I am finished with it (should be in 2021 [if I find the missing session], as I am missing only 2 sessions and I have magazines in mail from Japan that include results for one). I have pretty much 1-31 ready as I have books for them. I should have pretty much all swords done except for the 2 missing sessions. I still have lot work left on tosogu & koshirae (and attachments too) items from sessions 33-57 (haven't really focused on those as I have my other database project which I see far superior to this one). And as I'm still missing some items I haven't been in hurry. I've kept this totally under radar as it's just a hobby project for me. But lot of effort put in this one, so far 616 pages and a lot of items. Still currently looking Tōken Bijutsu magazines from 1985 and 1986 (Session 32 results in there) and I am looking for Jūyō book 32 as that is next in line for me and only session still missing. Here is a preview page: It is pretty basic but I like my idea 😄
    2 points
  10. Putting up for sale some nice and affordable items... these are actually not new to the board, previous post's been sabotaged, so I'm starting a new one) New stuff already went off FB. 1. Tigers in bamboo fuchi-kashira Craftsmanship in the essence. Look at the details, brilliant nanakoji, inlay work, carvings. Masterpiece grade item. Signed “Omori Teruhide Kao” Price: USD 750 2. Huang Shigong (Kosekiko) and Zhang Liang (Choryo) fuchi-kashira This is something really rare. Motif is quite popular but not so many items out there, especially f-k and this one is a true find. Fuchi is very nice, black shakudo dragon in golden waves, kashira is something special, miniature scene from the famous legend on finest nanakoji, you can see every detail, bridge surface is polished to mirror. A true masterpiece. Mumei Kyo-Kinko NTKK Kantei-sho (with English translation) Price: USD 400 3. Kirimon fuchi-kashira Very interesting f-k by the master of minute carvings Hosono Masamori. Signed “Hosono Sozaemon kore o horu, Hosono Masamori” Technique: suki-bori, kin-iroe Size: Fuchi: 3.7 x 1.9 x 0.8 cm Kashira: 3.3 x 1.7 x 0.6 cm Price: USD 250 4. Daruma and mokugyo/hossu (Zen Buddhism drum and brush) fuchi-kashira Famous design, nice work. Signed “Tou in-mei”, Tsuchiya Yasuchika Size: Fuchi: 34 x 17 mm Kashira: 31.6 x 12.5 mm Price: USD 250 Feel free to ask or buy) I paid more for all of these items so it's already a serious bargain. Don't miss your chance) Cheers!
    1 point
  11. 26.6 kilos 3.8 cm bore 100 monme 96.5 cm long. I have not taken it apart yet. A very dense and heavy gun , feels much heavier than it is.
    1 point
  12. I acquired this sword from a person who’s grandfather brought it back from WW2. We know nothing about it accept I talked to someone who said it was at least 1700s 1800s any help identifying it would be wonderful. Wondering if it’s worth having it restored or just hang it on my wall?? Might consider selling it. I just don’t know anything about it.
    1 point
  13. Up for sale is a Wakizashi attributed to Sendai Kunikane with Koshirae and NBTHK Hozon. Beautiful blade with stunning Masame hada and Suguha hamon. NBTHK doesn't say which generation Kunikane, but the quality of the forging hints at one of the earlier generations. Nagasa is 48.8cm, 6X31mm at the machi, 4X21mm at the yokote. Unaltered and in very good polish. Comes with a nice kosherae and shirasaya to complete the package. Shipping to the US only. SOLD
    1 point
  14. Hi I am interested in knowing who signed this intro and what one appreciates the value of it. It is said to be from the Edo period. Same for number 2 (said to be from Meiji) without signature. // Robert
    1 point
  15. Folks, for those interested in wartime Seki swordsmiths we have done a compilation on the Kojima family (Kanemichi, Kanetoki, Kanenori, Katsumasa). This puts them in the pre-war, wartime and post-war setting of Seki. Answered a lot of questions for us. Article is in Downloads. Mal & Neil
    1 point
  16. I think the top into is signed Koma Koryu saku (based on the Inro Handbook by Raymond Bushell). I know nothing about inro but this guy looks like a big name - one example sold for £36,000, so I’m guessing that it isn’t genuine. If you google the name you’ll see that the workmanship here is different. I’ll post the signature from the book in the morning.
    1 point
  17. Luke, Robinalexander has gone through the process of making he own liner. You can read about his efforts and the woods discussed ON THIS THREAD.
    1 point
  18. Caracal, it depends what your motivation is. Do you want to buy them as an investment, or for a quick sale, or because you love them? If the latter, then choose an absolute ceiling sum for you, don’t exceed it, and pray that no-one else loves it as much as you do. They are lovely. (Apologies if I am overstating the obvious.)
    1 point
  19. First may I recommend Wrangham's wonderful book? There you will find all the artists from the 古萬 Koma group and your particular inro/lacquer worker. (Koma Shinsai???) https://www.amazon.co.jp/-/en/Wrangham/dp/0952519445 Totally unable and unwilling to value such things, but you are asking about the inro, not the Netsuke or Ojime, right? I am sure the inro cannot be worth less than USD 500 each, and possibly considerably more, but it will be a select and narrow customer base for them, I should imagine. Some people spend their life studying published auction results to get such answers regarding value!
    1 point
  20. David, you didn’t mention the fittings. If they are fancy, wooden with lacquer finish, even double release buttons, then this blade may be something nice by a nice Smith. But if it’s standard fittings, then it’s likely just a war blade and it wouldn’t hurt to remove rust to read the writing. On the other hand, as a standard war blade, removing the rust wouldn’t reveal much. Likely 1943, 1944 1945, and a Seki Smith. But as a war blade, no one would criticize you much for cleaning it enough to read the writing.
    1 point
  21. It's too rusty to tell the whole thing, first two kanji should be 昭和(Showa),the rest should year and month.What about the others side?It should have smith's name.
    1 point
  22. This weeks supply has arrived ! https://www.jauce.com/auction/522772366 and before you ask, it is from a different seller from a different part of the country. And here is one from ebay with its original box! [bonus] https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Tsuba-guard-Japan-Samurai-Sword-sukashi-Engraved/402586358521?hash=item5dbc0452f9:g:C84AAOSwwMJfxxLu Indeed this particular seller has two other nambu tekki souvernirs also with their original cardboard boxes - so we can add two more designs to the non-tsuba collection. https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Tsuba-guard-Japan-Samurai-Sword-sukashi-Engraved-KAZISAKU/402586355314?hash=item5dbc044672:g:fCUAAOSwnFJfxxHj https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Tsuba-Samurai-Japanese-sword-Katana-Engraved-NOBUSHIGE/402586351872?hash=item5dbc043900:g:K00AAOSwqARfxxAN
    1 point
  23. The one in front is 36.4 kilos.
    1 point
  24. Quite a useful index! If Jussi willing I am sure quite a few people would pitch in with donation to express their gratitude for the work, Kirill R.
    1 point
  25. Brief update: I called Aoi and spoke to a very nice young lady who was able to sort me out. Payment received and confirmed and am now waiting for the export permit. Turns out my email server was blocking their emails. We resolved the issue by providing an alternate email address. During and subsequent to my call they have been great, basically killing me with kindness! lol! Thanks again everyone! Paul
    1 point
  26. Thanks for your input, so can i assume from the color of the fuchigashira that they are made of some kind of shibuichi ?
    1 point
  27. Brian, I did not wish to bring this up in Mr. Davidson's thread and appear as insensitive... and I do ask this question with the most honorable of intent. Have you ever considered an "In Memoriam" section?... maybe in the members only area like the Izakaya? It would be a wonderful way to remember/memorialize those who have 'gone before'. Details of what it would look like can be discussed later if you and others think it is a good idea. Mark
    1 point
  28. I have a tiny little boxed Higo Zogan folding mekugi-nuki, given to me years ago, far too nice to actually risk using. :headbang: 🈲️ Pic to follow .....
    1 point
  29. Good morning Thomas, I really like the larger hammer with the Kamon. Is it lacquered metal or wood? Reminds me of the type of hammers in kit to remove reluctant Tsuka. Hi JP, I've seen those type of Mekugi Nuki at DTI. Here's a link showing Mekugi Nuki made from original nakago: https://www.yamatobudogu.com/products/mekuginuki-made-of-a-antique-blade-nakago Also Aoi Art used to sell ones made of Silver, I always wondered if the silver was too ductile for the job?. https://www.aoijapan.net/silver-mekugi-nuki-youko-fox-spirit/
    1 point
  30. This is a nice topic and they are most enjoyable items shown. Lots of character. I will throw in a modern "mekugi pocker" made by Kimura Kanemitsu of Akamatsu Taro Tanrenjo in Kumamoto. With handmade bag. The saying "ichi go ichi e" means something like "always treat someone you meet as though its the first time, as it may be the last". Mal
    1 point
  31. They're a small item, and I suspect there are thousands of them in odd corners all over Japan unrecognised, unloved and ignored. Non of these are mine, alas, just images from the internet.
    1 point
  32. Just for fun, I have this "Tanto" ? which has been made from a broken wakisashi and with the end (A kind of kissaki) being reshaped. For which purpose ?
    1 point
  33. Three years ago I missed out on one that was 2.5 meters long and weighed about 100 kilos. It had been on display at a train station in Germany before the war and was taken back to the US after the war. I was really upset because it sold for a relative low cost.
    0 points
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