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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/09/2020 in all areas

  1. Thanks guys, those vibes are definitely making it across the continents 🙂 Home now, bedridden and starting the long recovery. But I'm here, and at your service. 😷
    6 points
  2. All Guys and Gals, Sword Freaks and Geeks - Please send out good thoughts, vibes, wishes, etc. today for good success with Brian's surgery. Hope he has a successful surgery and pain relief with quick recovery. Rich
    5 points
  3. Hi John This is a great question and I have asked it myself many years ago. Jussi is the best source for this but let me give it a crack. Many define the O-Kissaki as the shape that appeared in the Nanbokucho period however, there is evidence that some (very few) schools made extended kissaki before that time. The shapes of swords that came after the Mongol invasions attributed to the new shape of swords but even at the time of the early Kamakura some sword schools were experimenting with new styles. To define O-Kissaki I wish to note that I will omit the converted Naginata Naoshi blades, indeed some Naginata that were converted to larger Kissaki are wonderful and imposing in Sugata but they do not count. I will focus on swords with Kissaki that extend 4 cm and above with specific width over 2.5 cm in width. There will be Aoe blades that are longer in Kissaki but more slender (these are more extended Chu-Kissaki), I am open to the other members rebuttal on these measures. The Ideal O-Kissaki is over 3 cm in width and over 4 cm in length not exceeding 7.5 cm, in my opinion (Sadamune, Chogi, Motoshige, etc) There is evidence of Ko-Hoki (later Heian Ko-Hoki) making blades with extended Kissaki, this is a nice reference since we know that Masamune and Norishige used Ko-Hoki as a reference to their own eventual styles of Sugata, although the most beautiful Masamune (all Mumei so I leave that for another discussion) do not have overly extended Kissaki, they are just right so to say. Continuing into early Kamakura and there are very few examples from Ichimonji and Yamato that show extended kissaki but these may also be reshaped blades, hard to tell. Moving into the Mid-Kamakura we get Miike swords(love Miike myself), robust and powerful with intimidating shape that show the features of extended kissaki (still before the Mongol invasions of 1274 and 1281). But then we move to the golden age of sword constructs where almost every school begins to show O-Kissaki construction. Out of anticipation of the returning Mongol invasions no doubt, but impressive Sugata with massive Kissaki. Ichimonji (later schools), Mihara, Sairen in Chikuzen, and finally leading into the Soshu schools that really perfected the O-Kissaki and lent their skill to Soden Bizen. In my opinion the most magnificent O-Kissaki stem from Sadamune (Soshu) and then, (Soden-Bizen) Chogi, Kanemitsu, etc during the Nanbokucho. Were they preparing for another Mongol invasion, had the Japanese learnt more about armour from their enemies and then incorporated the best aspects into their construction at the time so the swords needed to answer that development? I am sure the armour groups here can answer that. What does become clear is that the next time we see the beauty of O-Kissaki after the Nanbokucho is during the Shin-Shinto period and that should be of note as to the use of such blades where Kiyomaro made outstanding Sugata that broke the status quo. In addition to O-Kissaki I think take into account the Kasane and Motohaba / Sakihaba as that tells you a lot about the robustness of the sword, for example, if you see Chogi (or Miike for that matter) it is not only about the O-Kissaki but the blade itself is wide and thick. Aoe has extended Chu-Kissaki that some mistake for O-Kissaki but this school is clear in its intention, some (few) late Nanbokucho follow the trends of Soden-Bizen and earlier blades are Chu-Kissaki and then extended Chu-kissaki and earlier ones will be Ko-kissaki. Conclusion, if you wan the best Koto O-Kissaki look at Soden-Bizen blades.
    3 points
  4. Hi, It's not a Mon but nameplate. It's carved as family name YOSHIDA (よしだ).
    3 points
  5. Possibly it is simply because of numbers of army officers vs numbers of navy officers? We see many more army gunto on the market than kaigunto, so we would come across less kai with mon. Maybe one of our members that specializes in kai would have some insight. Didn't we have someone who's avatar was "Kaigunto"? (tried a search but came up empty) I have one on a kai with a mumei Muromachi blade. Ha, now you're going to get flooded with examples!
    2 points
  6. Looks like a Gifu stamp to me. "Kiyotsugu Reference / Info" http://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/topic/18858-kiyotsugu-reference-info/
    2 points
  7. Another Nagamitsu. At least the assembly number does not match the mune number 3978.
    2 points
  8. It is interesting to see that a single Smith is using such a numbering system. I know we have seen numbers with other Smiths, but this is a pretty large number of blades he has been numbering.
    2 points
  9. If these are serial numbers, then they start at 1 and will go to three, four, or five digits. It looks like four digits in this case. After finishing the initial range of numbers starting with 1, they would start using a katakana prefix that follows the iroha poem order. In the West, we call these prefixes series marks. 1 to XXXX イ1 to イXXXX ロ1 to ロXXXX Something similar happened with Mantetsu swords except they did not use the no prefix series that started at 1.
    2 points
  10. Just to make sure everyone is aware of this recent revelation by Nick, Type 100 Officer's Swords were inspected from the beginning in 1940. This is the reason we are seeing inspection marks on this sword so early and not on Type 98s. It may be necessary to separate Type 98 and Type 100 markings for this reason. "Legally rebutting the existence of a Type 3 Army Officer's Sword" https://www.warrelics.eu/forum/f216/legally-rebutting-existence-type-3-army-officers-sword-708745-post2095801/#post2095801
    1 point
  11. I've updated the charts with the Fuller Survey data. Both the Cox and Fuller surveys used vast numbers of oshigata (Cox 426; Fuller 920). Cox stated that half (213) of those observed had stamps. Fuller didn't say, but assuming his was the same, then only 16% (77) of the Fuller blades, with stamps, were dated. 21% (44) of the Cox blades, with stamps, were dated. Most stamped blades are without dates. Small changes: -- We see a 3 year overlap of the Showa and Seki stamps - 1940 through May 1942 (which refines the previously held "early 1942" end of the Showa stamp). stamp survey (1).pdf
    1 point
  12. I would be amazed if the blade wasn't a chinese copy. I agree with Ray. Josh you seem to have an interest in Nihonto so I hope this is just an experience to learn from and you stick around and further your knowledge and interest. Good luck. Greg
    1 point
  13. I have only seen (via pictures) one Meiji era Type 8, ever, but it was like the ones seen in Dawson's book, pages 30-31. He has a close one, thought to be custom made on pages 40-41, but there are differences. Of course, all Type 8s, 19s, and Kyugunto had multitudinous variations, so it is possible Dawson's is simply a shop variation of this model. But the short answer is - no haven't ever seen one. Interesting bit of history there!
    1 point
  14. I hope you are out of bed and chasing gazelle soon as, John
    1 point
  15. Thank you very much for sharing this information! All that I knew came from one Chinese webpage. As this is getting off topic, I will sign off on the matter. 65type-cavalry-sword-baidu.pdf
    1 point
  16. When I see a blade like this on a dealer website, I suspect it has already been submitted to Juyo shinsa and failed. The shinsa numbers indicate that there must be many such "near-miss Juyo" blades out there, that show up for sale as TH (which is a requirement for submission). Someone once recommended to me that this was a desirable category of blades for collecting -- near-Juyo quality at a much lower price.
    1 point
  17. I once owned a set of fuchigashira with the very same theme and thought about that question too. Although I never found a concrete explanation, I assumed the theme was symbolic. As you probably know, Empress Jingū is said to have given birth to Ōjin after Emperor Chūai had already passed away (in the literature it is said to be three years, but it probably three seasons, which would equate to nine months - the average term of pregnancy). During this time, Minister Takenouchi played a pivotal role as Empress Jingū's advisor. As the closest male influence upon the young Ōjin, he may have even fulfilled the role of a father figure, which might explain why he is nursing the infant Ōjin. Moreover, Takenouchi also acted as an adviser to Ōjin, when Ōjin succeeded his mother to became emperor. In light of this, Minister Takenouchi could be said to have figuratively raised Ōjin from a child to an emperor. This, however, is mere speculation on my part, and if you have the time you might want to look at the Kojiki and the Nihon Shoki, which are the primary sources for the lives of Empress Jingū and Emperor Ōjin. Perhaps something more literal is contained there.
    1 point
  18. Chris, nice one! Good shot on the hada! Always willing to learn, Thomas, can you explain a bit further?
    1 point
  19. Steve These are not Type 32 wannabe.It is a modern Chinese copy of the original 60's Chinese PLA Type 65 cavalry sword. Although Type 65 is an official copy of Japanese type 32 by PLA.😀 PS:I'm looking to buy the original Type 65 cavalry sword, if any member got one and wants to part with it, please let me know.
    1 point
  20. Actually, yours is lower. 阪 3490 vajo 阪 イ313 Ooitame
    1 point
  21. I did it again! I posted in English, but machine translation was turned on. Thank you, Dale.
    1 point
  22. This sword, although attributed to Katayama Ichimonji is not in great shape. I have done a few highlights where there are openings in the steel and one Umegane where the polish is a definite risk (Umegane can "pop"open). I think the shape is nice, however, in this condition it has a few things against it for Katayama like the length being under the Goldilocks 70cm minimum for Juyo candidates in this category. The nakago is ok for a sword this old (the mekugi ana could have been finished better). On polishers I think Kenji Mishina is amazzing for Edo and later blades, there are other polishers that can work on older swords and I would recommend asking Paul Martin for his advice. Yanagawa is a polisher that can help with very small openings and does magic, do not ask me how, I have no idea but the work is outstanding. I would not bet this sword for Juyo at all, the Mumei Katayama that pass Juyo are near perfect (Kensen) in condition. Recently the Juyo panel in Japan has become very strict and puts great emphasis on the condition of the blade first and foremost. If someone buys this blade it will be to enjoy it as it is.
    1 point
  23. Translation of Yasaka Azuma's last post in English [google translate, as usual google needs a little help] "Aside from gifts and brims (tsuba) for appreciation, if a craftsman considers the practical aspects of the blade, he should not make extreme inlays or reliefs that would interfere with the face stand area (seppa-dai)." "From the face of the face (seppa-dai) , it can be seen that even such a small inlay has not penetrated. The same was true for this bargain, with the agent winning the bid. Obviously, it avoids the faceplate (seppa-dai) and skillfully expresses the relief with iron and soft metal."
    1 point
  24. What an old romantic naga-wakizashi! There is Nie-suji, which is said to be the "crawl of slugs", so it is certainly Uda-school. The 23.5-inch O-suri-age is very similar to my own sword. I suspect that it is not a modification of WW2, but a modification for the two-handed saber of Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Admiration. An example of two-handed saber of Russo-Japanese War. https://page.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/493690629
    1 point
  25. As Steve suggests, the reading of 政随 for the founder of the Hamano school is Shōzui, but be aware that his mei is widely copied. I've attached the reference from Sesko's Signatures for you to compare . I have also had a look through my copy of Joly's Kakihan, which Geraint recommended, for Shōzui, but it doesn't match the kao on your kashira
    1 point
  26. 贈り物や鑑賞のツバは別として、職人が刀身の実用的な側面を検討する場合、彼は切羽台エリアを妨げる極端なインレイやレリーフを作るべきではありません。 切羽跡からは、このような小さな象眼でも侵入していないことがわかります。 https://page.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/b488291304 同じことがこのお買い得商品にも当てはまり、エージェントが落札しました。明らかに、切羽台を避け、鉄と軟質金属で巧みに浮き彫りを表現しています。 https://page.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/m429510867
    1 point
  27. Hi, Kogatana mei says Ozaki Gengouemon Suketaka. 尾崎源五右衛門助隆
    1 point
  28. Hello, I recently acquired this lovely kinko tsuba from Grey Doffin. The front depicts a chase in the clouds between a Samurai and a Demon that has stolen a treasure and the back the Samurai has caught the Demon and taken the treasure back. I was wondering if anyone has information about the folk tale depicted and any ideas which school it might be from? Tom
    1 point
  29. Strangely of I click on that link for me just comes back to this post. Its like a loop.
    1 point
  30. I feel that if this was a probable Juyo candidate then Tsuruta san would have got the polish done himself and entered it for shinsa.
    1 point
  31. Yes! We do have something quite special here.
    1 point
  32. Tony I have seen Museum examples that have been copied straight from a photograph, in fact some Museums only display the omote side of the guard - this doesn't seem to worry the fakers, they substitute another design on the ura side, often nothing even close to the original. It is possible to find two Museum examples from two different schools/masters on the one fake guard. If the design appears in a good quality book and is 'famous' it will be copied, even modern pieces such as by Paul Chen have been copied [some very crude] and with omote views of two guards in one. The examples show two Paul Chen originals then the combined fake example [you will note no kogai hitsu ]. The hitsu seems to present some problems with design so some examples flip the nakago-ana so both sides line up the hitsu, see the third picture example [The middle one could not make up its mind]. These are easy to identify fakes some go to very much more extremes to fool the buyer.
    1 point
  33. sorry to disagree but, IMHO 100% fake you can see the burr marks on the Ana tang hole are still fresh looking , plus the Fuchi is signed upside down, the tsuka ito wrap all going in the same direction , the Habaki looks very suspect too ,, looks like a Chinese fake to me . just my two pennies worth
    1 point
  34. Josh, Welcome to the Board and the wide, wonderful World of the Japanese sword. Its a bruising experience to be told that something you have is not the real deal, but I do hope you will stay around and explore the Board to see the possibilities in this enthralling study of Nihontou. I take my hat of the Steve M who is a stalwart on the Board for difficult translations and his recognition of the smith and period. If the blade is a non-genuine Nihontou it means a Chinese (?) source has done a good job of copying the signature of an obscure smith in a reasonably competent way, but the offset machi (notches) is pretty much a giveaway indication of a Chinese copy. I think it would help if you could clean the baby powder off the tang and photograph both sides including the notches looking straight down on it. We can then see more clearly the colour of the tang and style and condition of the filemarks. It also greatly helps if you orient the photos vertically. Best regards, BaZZa. (Melbourne, Australia) EDIT: I do want to edit this for everyone's benefit, I hope. I had JUST completed the reply above when my computer suddenly went down. A household fuse had blown and I thought "There goes my reply". So I came back on wondering where a draft might be kept... I was still connected to the Board and when I pressed "Reply..." my draft was all there. Wundebar etc etc. So here it is...
    1 point
  35. Good vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibesGood vibes.... to Brian,
    1 point
  36. I think that there are two FUKURE, and they seem to be really big under the surface. That means, another polish will make them come to the surface, and that will not look nice. The value is indeed considerably reduced, and that does not depend a lot on the era or smith.
    1 point
  37. I bought it like that from Japan for a decent price. I just wanted something as a nice display piece. More pictures below.
    1 point
  38. Hi Mike, & welcome. Your number 1 goal is a good one, but please do not address self-polishing of any blades! That's an absolute no-no on NMB! Only trained togi (polishers) should do anything more than keep a blad from deteriorating. A good start point for you is https://to-ken.uk/resources/sword%20etiquette.html & we look forward to seeing your photos.
    1 point
  39. While we are on the subject.... A tanto made around the same time.
    1 point
  40. Some shots of the hada of the one I posted that is an utsushi of Masamune. Not your typical Gassan hada!
    1 point
  41. Uwe, Beautiful, but is it SADAKAZU II and not SADAKAZU I??? The OP's link is to SADAKAZU I and I thought that was the theme of the thread?? Or have I lost the plot??? (Lovely bottle of Shiraz with dinner...) BaZZa.
    1 point
  42. Close up and of kissaki and bohi termination is a must. It's a huge tell tale. Fakes never get it right.
    1 point
  43. No, as stated by Steve, the bohi is off.
    1 point
  44. How about trading me for your avatar piece ? 😉
    0 points
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