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#1 reinhard

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 05:14 AM

This pair of menuki are depicting one of the most touching legends of old Japan. Obviously they are Goto school, but what I would like to know from you: What story do they depict?

reinhard

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#2 Nobody

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 05:43 AM

I think that I know the answer. The story may be the episode of Hojo Tokiyori (北条時頼) and Bonsai.

Is there someone who can translate the following info. That is too much for me. :bowdown:
Ref. http://roots-bonsai....e/45341373.html

MORIYAMA Koichi
盡人事而待天命 - Do one's best and leave the rest to Providence.

♪ Nobody knows de trouble I see, Nobody knows but ......


#3 Nobody

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 07:00 AM

I just found an article about the story in English.
Ref. http://www.phoenixbo.../HachiNoKi.html

MORIYAMA Koichi
盡人事而待天命 - Do one's best and leave the rest to Providence.

♪ Nobody knows de trouble I see, Nobody knows but ......


#4 Brian

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 09:49 AM

Reinhard,
Could you elaborate a bit on why they are obviously Goto? Not a tosogu guy by any means, but I didn't get "Goto" on first impression at all.

Brian

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#5 Bugyotsuji

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 10:51 AM

I just found an article about the story in English.
Ref. http://www.phoenixbo.../HachiNoKi.html


I enjoyed that, Koichi san. :thanks:
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#6 Carlo Giuseppe Tacchini

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 11:44 AM

Nice one Reinhard.
Would we call the tell-tale a *possible* example of Shogunal "propaganda" ?

About a similar matter I would like to assk to all the Kodogu specialists :
as per you knowledge, has the tell-tale of Ubagaishi (姥が石) at Himeji-Jo (the old woman providing a millstone to help Hashiba Hideyoshi in building the castle) ever been pictured in Kodogu ?

Would be helpful for the Phd of a friend of mine.

Please forgive my english
______

http://www.webalice....ZZZZZ_ESSAY.htm


#7 reinhard

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 01:44 AM

First of all: Congratulations and many thanks to Moriyama-san, for providing us with the link to the story. You saved me from telling the story by myself.

The reason for posting these menuki was precisely NOT to talk of subtle details, craftsmanship, mei, techniques and the like, for once. Coming across tosogu, many westerners tend to see in them just nice landscapes, funny people, pittoresque animals, plants and insects and many other things they can't interprete, but in many cases they don't care any further. They are enjoying craftsmanship and are willing to study details: Could this dragon's tail be Goto X's or this nanako be Ishiguro Y's ? Necessary questions of course, but what I wanted to show: Above a certain degree of knowledge, tosogu are more fun, if you know Japan's history, myths and legends. What appear, at first glance, to be just any man sitting next to a fire and another one sitting next to a bonsai tree, turn out to be a statement, not only by the Kinko, but also by the (future) owner. - Another reason for posting was: This legend represents the very heart and soul of samurai culture to me.

reinhard

#8 Goldy

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 04:36 AM

Here's a bit more from "Legends of Japanese Art"

"HACHI NO KI - Story of the Potted Trees.
In 1253 the fifth Hojo Shikken, TOKIYORI, abdicated in favour of his son, and taking the title of Abbot Saimioji, went on a journey through Japan, with only one companion, DOUN NIKIAIDO, also disguised as a monk. Both suffered greatly from the hardships attending a winter trip, and one night when stopped by a storm of unusual violence, they took refuge in the house of a man whose refined ways proved that he had seen better days. On enquiry they found that he was the son of a magistrate of Sano, who had been despoiled of his estate through his confidence in an unworthy kinsman. He, however, did not bear any ill-will to the Kamakura clan, though his petitions to the authorities had been constantly ignored, and in proof of his loyalty, he showed them his suit of armour and rusty weapons. The ex -Regent forced this man, TSUNEYO SANO, to accept a small present of money, in exchange for which he received from Tsuneyo's wife a lock of her hair. Before they left in the morning, Tsuneyo apologized for being so poor that he had no incense wherewith to effect the purefication ceremonies, but bringing near the fire-place his dwarf trees, the flowering plum, the bamboo, and pine, he chopped them down and burnt them instead. A year later a rising of the Miura clan necessitated a general call to arms, and from all parts of the country warriors came to Kamakura, even long after the revolt had been quelled. Amongst the late comers, was Tsuneyo, in wretched attire and on a rossinante, whose presence excited a great deal of merriment. On giving his name he was at once taken to the Regent, in whom he recognized his guest of the previous year. Tokiyori restored to him his father's estate and office, and added to it three domains, the names of which bore resemblance to Pine, Plum and Bamboo. In the No play it is said that the trees were used to warm the guest room during the cold night."

I wonder if the Noh play is like the modern day equivalent of 'based on a story by...' ?

Cheers,
Craig G.
Australia




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