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Dual Orikaeshimei


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#1 raymondsinger

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 12:29 AM

This is something I have not seen before and thought was worth sharing. This has a dual orikaeshimei, in which both the mei and nengo have been folded over to the opposing side of the nakago (at the time of suriage). Must have been a challenging endeavor and appears very well done. 

 

http://www.toukenkom...na_A111118.html


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#2 John A Stuart

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 01:15 AM

Well worth noting. John


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#3 ROKUJURO

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 01:21 AM

Yes, really interesting NAKAGO. Modifications are indeed very well made.


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Regards,

Jean C.

#4 TETSUGENDO

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:03 AM

Masterfully done, that's the tidiest work I've seen !

 

-S-


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#5 Guido Schiller

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:45 AM

I think it's technically impossible to have a double orikaeshi-mei - my guess is that's it a tanzaku-mei inlayed in a fashion to make it look like orikaeshi. Or maybe a combination of orikaeshi and tanzaku mei.


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#6 b.hennick

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:55 AM

I could see it happen for one side but not for both.
Regards,
Barry Hennick

#7 DRDave

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 04:21 AM

Look closely.  There's a straight razor shape folded both ways.  Nice!

 

dual orikaeshimei.jpg

 


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#8 Vermithrax16

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 04:47 AM

I can think of a way to do this, but it's not easy at all. Great study piece, thanks Ray!


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#9 Ooitame

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:31 AM

Or maybe a combination of orikaeshi and tanzaku mei.


Agreed, I would say that it looks to be both... Harimei and orikaeshi mei.
Eric

#10 raymondsinger

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:32 AM

I think this was done as a single piece, with the nakago bisected (ura vs. omote) into two flaps which could be folded over each other to the opposite sides of the nakago. Crude sketch attached.

PSX_20190111_223041.jpg
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#11 obiwanknabbe

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 08:48 AM

I have trouble imagining the amount of time it would have taken to do this with hand tools. Pretty darn amazing!


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#12 raymondsinger

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 07:24 PM

This is how it appears to me to be a true dual orikashimei with the nakago sliced omote & ura along the mune.

PSX_20190112_121720.jpg PSX_20190112_121744.jpg PSX_20190112_121804.jpg PSX_20190112_121827.jpg PSX_20190112_121855.jpg PSX_20190112_121928.jpg PSX_20190112_124339.jpg PSX_20190112_124424.jpg
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#13 Brian

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 08:43 PM

Wow. Good explanation Ray :clap:


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#14 b.hennick

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 09:21 PM

You convinced me.
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Regards,
Barry Hennick

#15 Peter Bleed

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 09:39 PM

And then it got tested to prove the that nakago was sturdy enough for work!

Thank you Ray for a wonderful object and a  fine analysis.

Peter


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Peter Bleed

#16 kissakai

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:33 PM

That is a smart analysis

I'd no idea what you were talking about until I saw the paper example


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Grev UK


#17 Jussi Ekholm

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:54 PM

Very interesting piece, also note the original length before suriage. As the sword is now still 72,4 cm I'd think it has been 90 cm(ish) originally, nice c.3 shaku katana.


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Jussi Ekholm


#18 Guido Schiller

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 12:14 AM

I couldn‘t wrap my head around it, but yes, that indeed makes sense - good thinking, Ray!
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#19 Peter Bleed

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 12:54 AM

Ray,

You ought to send thus piece to Token Bijutsu. With your graphics it would be clear to the whole readership - even if the text were in Eigo.

P


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Peter Bleed

#20 Vermithrax16

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 01:17 AM

Well done Ray. That's what I was thinking but could not put into words. Man that smith must have been a steady hand to not screw that up.


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Jeremiah

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#21 raymondsinger

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 01:27 AM

Thanks all, and will give consideration to that Peter.

Best regards,
Ray

#22 PNSSHOGUN

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 02:58 AM

This sword was clearly extremely special to the owner to have this difficult Suriage performed.


John


#23 Valric

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 10:36 AM

Conjecture: because of the plethora of Seki Kanemoto, including far less skilled later generations, the owner preserved the date to point to a good generation Kanemoto and paid the extra money for the difficult Suriage. Does this make any sense? 


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Chris H. 


#24 raymondsinger

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 01:21 PM

This is Kanetomo (兼知) rather than Kanemoto and there were far fewer smiths who are candidates who might may made this sword if the nengo were absent. There is only one in the Toko Taikan, though the listing mentions that there are three in the Meikan (which I do not have on hand).

https://nihontoclub.com/smiths/KAN2597

#25 Michaelr

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 06:24 PM

Ray thank you so much for sharing this and most of all for the follow up of the paper cut out and further explanation. At first glance at the post I thought “ wow that’s really cool” then after the paper cut out follow up I was blown away. Again thank you. MikeR
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