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Very Unusual "konan Essei" Mantetsu


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#1 Bruce Pennington

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 07:33 PM

Came across this quite unusual gunto on the Kinghouse.sg, sword collection site. I tried copying the particular page, but the link takes you to page 1 of 27. The sword is on page 7.
http://www.kinghouse...frame.asp?cat=8

He claims, and it does appear to be made by Mantetsu, but it simply "Konan Essei" stamped on the nakago (picture attached).

According to the collector: "Extremely Rare Mantetsu sword signed "Konan Issei

This is an extremely rare blade specially made by Mantetsu, South Manchurian Railway Company for the senior Officers at South Pacific War zone during the last stage of the War in 1945. very few were made and very hard to find. It's so rare that no literature on "Konan Issei" can be found.

During 1944 and 1945 the Japanese suffered major reverses in mainland Asia in South Central China and Burma, while the Allies crippled the Japanese Navy and captured key Western Pacific islands.

"Konan Issei" swords were created hastily from readily Mantetsu blades in very small quantity at Seki in 1945 at the final phase of WW2 to rush to the senior commanders fighting in the South Pacific War.

"Konan Issei" was meant "to win the South Pacific War with determination" a "WAR CRY" to boost the morale of the very weary troops after loss of many battles.

To the best of my knowledge, this sword, is so far, the only one with "Konan Issei" inscription that has surfaced unlike other swords made by Mantetsu. The hamon is suguha and except with the wordings" Konan Isshin, otherwise, it's very much a Mantetsu sword"

It's the first I've ever heard of this, but it appears legit. He's got 3 other standard Mantetsu Koa's, and I've emailed them for the serial numbers. Hopefully they reply!177_t3.jpg
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#2 DRDave

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 10:45 PM

I think the blades of 1945 are interesting, knowing the adversity the Japanese were having to endure; yet even though the hope of victory had vanished, the people were determined to persevere.  


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Dave Davis


#3 Bruce Pennington

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 05:50 AM

Just got confirmation that the slogan was in use in Japan, culturally. He thinks it was more around 1942. Hopefully the owner will respond to my request for a date and serial number.

#4 PNSSHOGUN

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 09:58 AM

I wonder are these swords all owned by the creator of the site, or were for sale and since been sold? It's honestly an astounding collection regardless.


John


#5 Bruce Pennington

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:17 AM

I wonder are these swords all owned by the creator of the site, or were for sale and since been sold? It's honestly an astounding collection regardless.


I don't know John. In the intro page, he says he's sold some of his watch collection, but he didn't mention swords being sold. 208 Japanese swords and 2 dirks!!!

#6 vajo

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 10:50 AM

A very good collection with many nice swords. Did you see that some swords are bought from Showa22. These pictures are total unique  :)



#7 Brian

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 11:08 AM

 

In my 15 younger years in Japan, I spent my free time visiting museums and sword shops admiring the beauty of the samurai swords and as a martial art practitioner, I greatly admire the Bushido spirit.

Whilst in the process of preparing for the private museum, I have decided to make Japanese Swords part of my dream.

In future, I would welcome serious collector of all kinds of swords to contact me for a private viewing and to exchange views but at this moment of time, due to security reason, I could only entertain International known Japanese sword collectors or specialist who can help to provide advice. Till later, when I am able to acquire a properly secured place to house and permanently display all my collections, kindly enjoy the items virtually.

However, I do not entertain curious persons as these are controlled items and licensed by the police and are not for sale or exchange.

A private museum is a multi-million dollar project so it takes a lot of planning and acquiring a suitable property at the right price...too many factors to put it in place. Whilst the preparation is on-going, this website shall serve as a virtual museum but kindly bear in mind that items depicted on this website are few examples representing each each collection. My Japanese paintings total 5,000 pieces and Chinese paintings, a few hundreds...together with hundreds of Chinese antiques and also the rare watch collection.

Must be an amazing and multi-million $ collection. In Singapore?
 


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#8 Rayhan

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Posted 10 November 2018 - 12:15 PM

Singapore would be a likely place

#9 Bruce Pennington

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Posted 11 November 2018 - 12:28 AM

Interesting follow up from Nick Komiya, at Warrelics:

“Now I know that the phrase Kou-nan 興南 was referring to the colonization of Southern China as well as Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, etc. The main emphasis of the Kou-nan program was development of Japanese multicultural administrators to run the colonies and promote Japanese language education. They started to train such personnel in April 1941 and the school was initially called Takunan-Juku (Development of the South Classes), a 2 year program that sent 300 graduates out to the southern countries. This school changed its name to Kou-nan-Rensei-in 興南錬成院 (Academy of Southern Territories Development Administrators) in November 1942 and, under that name, they sent out 179 graduates to the South. One year later, they will further change their name to Academy of Great East Asia Development Administrators.

Thus colonial development of South East Asia initially used the phrase Takunan 拓南, then Kou-nan 興南 and further Great East Asia Development 大東亜. Think of it as a Japanese counterpart to something like "Pax Romana".

Kounan, the phrase used on the sword was only used between November 1942 and November 1943. Thus the sword can be dated linguistically to this period.

Koua, "Development of Asia" was a phrase used in a similar context, but preceded Takunan.

So it is clear that "Koua-Isshin" and "Kou-nan Issei" were twin slogans representing Japan's pre-1944 coloniallization program and those slogans are attributed to a specific timeframe, but how and why they ended up being engraved on swords is another story.

By the end of the war, after November 1943, Kounan-Issei was a dead phrase, and it was totally out of place to mention the phrase in connection with the last ditch efforts in the South Pacific, out of place like the German word "Lebensraum" in late 43/44.”
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#10 DRDave

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Posted 11 November 2018 - 01:32 AM

 The search for a '45 Mantetsu continues...


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#11 Bruce Pennington

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 06:12 PM

The search for a '45 Mantetsu continues...

Well, I guess it just ended! Mr. Chua just sent me pics of the date and serial number of the Konan Essei blade, and it's Spring 1945. Serial number is odd in that it has a hiragana "I" and a katakana "Na", "22".

So his story is correct. I'm writing back to see if he will let us know his source on the story. pics attached.

Mantetsu Konan Issei, Spring  1945.jpg SERIAL NUMBER.jpg


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#12 vajo

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 07:54 PM

Very interesting Bruce. 

 

I study allways your topics to learn more. Keep on.

 

Btw i search for a mantetsu in Type 3 mounts. Never see one.



#13 BANGBANGSAN

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Posted 13 November 2018 - 06:56 AM

 

Very interesting Bruce. 
 
I study allways your topics to learn more. Keep on.
 
Btw i search for a mantetsu in Type 3 mounts. Never see one.

 
Here is mine Mantetsu in late Type 3 Mount.

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Trystan


#14 vajo

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Posted 13 November 2018 - 07:48 AM

Very good Trystan. In last stage mounts. Very nice to see one. Dated 45?
Same is looking like snake or something else?

Best
Chris

#15 BANGBANGSAN

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Posted Today, 08:06 AM

 

Very good Trystan. In last stage mounts. Very nice to see one. Dated 45?
Same is looking like snake or something else?

Best
Chris

 

Both were made in 昭和甲申春(1944 Spring)

Trystan





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