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#1 IJASWORDS

IJASWORDS

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 07:10 AM

Help with this mei would be appreciated. I suspect it is KUNITADA and OKIMOTO is the only smith I could find with that name. Thanks.   

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Neil

#2 Shugyosha

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 08:58 AM

Hi Neil,

 

I suspect that this is a slogan rather than a smith's name - anyhow the last kanji isn't "tada", it is read "on" and means benefit, favour or obligation. I can't find a match for the first kanji so you are going to have to have some better help than I can provide, but here are the others:

 

[  ]泥亦國恩

 

Best,

John


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Best regards, John 

Please excuse my spelling mistakes, brevity and ignorance.


#3 IJASWORDS

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 11:28 AM

Thanks John, no wonder I couldn't find it in a list of sword smith oshigata. What are the two kanji before Kuni? Can I take it then the last two read kuni on? More help needed I am afraid. 


Neil

#4 Shugyosha

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 11:38 AM

亦 is pronounced "mata" meaning again, or also.

 

泥 pronunciation is "doro" meaning mud, slush, mire, dirt.

 

Yes, I believe the last two kanji are read "kuni" and "on".

 

Sorry about the shading...don't know where it came from.


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Best regards, John 

Please excuse my spelling mistakes, brevity and ignorance.


#5 IJASWORDS

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 05:59 AM

A little help still required, thanks in advance. 

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Neil

#6 Guido Schiller

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 09:41 AM

I think John got those 4 characters correctly, and as he, I'm at a loss for the first one. The only thing I can contribute is that 國恩 (kokuon) means "gratitude from the fatherland".


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#7 SteveM

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 10:28 AM

The first one is a mystery... maybe a stylized version of 深, but that still doesn't lead me anywhere. 


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Steve M

#8 yimu

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 03:55 AM

it is from a poem by 

頼山陽

 

 

畫 龜
既無神異智。  既に神異の智なし
豈近廟廊尊。  豈に廟廊の尊に近ずかんや
曳尾吾生足。  尾を曳きて吾が生 足る
深泥亦国恩。  深泥も亦た国恩

 

I will leave it to you to interpret what that means,  :bang: 


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Y i m u Y i n

#9 k morita

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 04:47 AM

Hi,

This inscription is a phrase of poem by Rai Sanyo 頼山陽(1781-1832).
https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Rai_San'yō

This inscription says 深泥亦国恩 .
Meaning is "A tortoise doesn't have a big hope in the deep mud, but he feels favor for the country "  


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K Morita
 

#10 yimu

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 04:58 AM

Is it plausible to assume that this is a late Edo / early Meiji period sword, given how popular 頼山陽 was back then among intellectual reformers? The nakago does look the part, right? 

 

 

Hi,

This inscription is a phrase of poem by Rai Sanyo 頼山陽(1781-1832).
https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Rai_San'yō

This inscription says 深泥亦国恩 .
Meaning is "A tortoise doesn't have a big hope in the deep mud, but he feels favor for the country "  


Y i m u Y i n

#11 IJASWORDS

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 05:04 AM

WOW, thanks for the translation and link. It is a beautiful sentiment expressed on a WW2 officer sword. 


Neil

#12 yimu

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 05:09 AM

o

 

WOW, thanks for the translation and link. It is a beautiful sentiment expressed on a WW2 officer sword. 

gunto also makes sense...  :)


Y i m u Y i n

#13 IJASWORDS

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 05:26 AM

Hi Yimu, it is a WW2 KATO JUMYO SAKU blade. 


Neil





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