Jump to content


Photo

For Those Using Gun Specific Oils On Nihonto

restoration

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 PNSSHOGUN

PNSSHOGUN

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 1,812 posts
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 26 January 2018 - 08:07 AM

This is a *very* indepth and informative thread on just how different lubricants, gun oils and other similar products perform for protecting metals. Worth a read and compare with your own experiences using some on swords.

 

https://www.shooters...evaluation.html

 

I thought the staining and corrosive tests were particularly relevant due to the different and delicate materials found in Japanese swords. Some of the more aggressive gun cleaning products and oils are good for cleaning martial arts swords but none of us would dream of using them on Nihonto.


  • BulletSprinkler likes this

John


#2 vajo

vajo

    Tokubetsu Juyo

  • Members
  • 3,569 posts
  • LocationGermany / Bavaria

Posted 26 January 2018 - 09:44 AM

Very dangerous stuff for your health on that test list. I can say from my experience. Use Kurobara, Caramba70 (smells like vanilla) or WD40.
You dont need other stuff which could cause cancer.

 

camellia_oil.jpg

I use this.


  • Dave R likes this

#3 paulb

paulb

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 2,376 posts
  • LocationUK

Posted 26 January 2018 - 11:42 AM

don't use WD40 on sword blades it contains solvents which at best stains and at worst damages the polished surface


  • Stephen, nagamaki - Franco, Dave R and 3 others like this

#4 Stephen

Stephen

    Oyabun

  • Members
  • 13,413 posts
  • LocationIowa

Posted 26 January 2018 - 12:19 PM

Agree never WD 40.
A light non scented gun oil if you have nothing else around.
  • b.hennick likes this
"This to shall pass"
USMC DEC 63 APR 73

#5 Ooitame

Ooitame

    Jo Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 265 posts
  • LocationUSA

Posted 26 January 2018 - 04:14 PM

Very nice find.
  • BulletSprinkler likes this
Eric

#6 Vermithrax16

Vermithrax16

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 1,596 posts
  • LocationBoston Metro North

Posted 27 January 2018 - 01:48 AM

Derek did this for Nihonto, a great thread:

http://www.militaria...to-oil-a-study/


  • Greg F, PNSSHOGUN and Ooitame like this

Jeremiah

"Is there gonna be a fight Wyatt?"

"I think that there must be."


#7 PNSSHOGUN

PNSSHOGUN

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 1,812 posts
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 27 January 2018 - 02:51 AM

Derek did this for Nihonto, a great thread:

http://www.militaria...to-oil-a-study/

Ah excellent, I'm glad someone did it for Nihonto oil, it's really interesting seeing the two tests side by side.


  • Vermithrax16 likes this

John


#8 Hastur

Hastur

    Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 114 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 03 February 2018 - 06:56 AM

I tend to use Tuff Glide standard myself since I have it around. any concerns with that stuff on Nihonto?


Brad G.

#9 ROKUJURO

ROKUJURO

    Juyo

  • Members
  • 2,547 posts
  • LocationIn a deep valley

Posted 03 February 2018 - 12:04 PM

The problem with tests is to reproduce the real conditions. Derek did a great job, but mild steel has a very different 'behaviour' than low alloy carbon steel as far as corrosion is concerned. Carbon steel is quite easily attacked by rust, mild steel not so much. 


Regards,

Jean C.

#10 Bazza

Bazza

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 1,438 posts
  • LocationMelbourne, Australia

Posted 03 February 2018 - 02:16 PM

And "pure" iron as in unalloyed Fe??  The Iron Pillar of Delhi comes to mind:

http://www.ancient-o...ar-delhi-001503

 

BaZZa.



#11 ROKUJURO

ROKUJURO

    Juyo

  • Members
  • 2,547 posts
  • LocationIn a deep valley

Posted 03 February 2018 - 03:42 PM

Yes, that is one of the properties of very pure iron. It is not so exposed  to the risk of corrosion. But there are also modern iron alloys with similar properties (e.g. CORTEN steel). These metals produce a (protective) superficial layer of rust, but the process stops by itself. We can see this quite often on regularly used items like handrails.

In Japanese metal craftsmanship we have SABIJI, an artificially induced, protective layer of iron oxides.  

Corrosion processes may be influenced by changing environmental conditions, e.g. pollution/acid rain.


Regards,

Jean C.

#12 PNSSHOGUN

PNSSHOGUN

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 1,812 posts
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 03 February 2018 - 04:08 PM

I'd love to see the eggheads and boffins down at the labs cook up a scientifically formulated and specially designed protective product just for Nihonto. The market is there, especially for museum and high grade collections.


  • Greg F and Vermithrax16 like this

John


#13 Sporkkaji

Sporkkaji

    Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 111 posts

Posted 11 February 2018 - 04:28 AM

I'd love to see the eggheads and boffins down at the labs cook up a scientifically formulated and specially designed protective product just for Nihonto. The market is there, especially for museum and high grade collections.

 

I believe most museums, at least those which don't specialize in Nihonto displays but still have weapon collections use Renaissance Wax to protect them because it is so long lasting and low maintenance. I couldn't see most museum staff religiously oiling their swords like a serious private collector.

 

Personally every six months I reapply the highest grade gun oil I'm aware of, Wilson Combat Ultima Lube in the lightest viscosity they offer. Definitely never any off the shelf Wal-Mart stuff.


C. Lewis

#14 Vermithrax16

Vermithrax16

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 1,596 posts
  • LocationBoston Metro North

Posted 11 February 2018 - 06:12 AM

I'd love to see the eggheads and boffins down at the labs cook up a scientifically formulated and specially designed protective product just for Nihonto. The market is there, especially for museum and high grade collections.

How about a cyanobacteria produced oil derived from sunlight and waste CO2 gas for a high quality sword oil with no acidity?


  • PNSSHOGUN and BulletSprinkler like this

Jeremiah

"Is there gonna be a fight Wyatt?"

"I think that there must be."


#15 Jamie

Jamie

    Jo Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 739 posts

Posted 12 February 2018 - 11:43 PM

Why not just use what been used for centuries? It seems to have worked.
  • peterd, Dave R and Wayben like this
Jamie

#16 Ken-Hawaii

Ken-Hawaii

    Tokubetsu Juyo

  • Members
  • 4,074 posts
  • LocationKaneohe, Hawaii, USA

Posted 13 February 2018 - 11:51 AM

 

cyanobacteria produced oil derived from sunlight and waste CO2 gas for a high quality sword oil with no acidity

Wouldn't this eventually oxidize & degrade, Jeremiah?

 

Ken

 


Ken Goldstein

 

Anyone can be tough for a season,

but it takes a special kind of human to rise to life's challenges for a lifetime.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: restoration

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq