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Takahori Mei

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#1 Kurikata

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 11:39 AM

Hi,

 

I wan wandering how rare is a tosogu with a mei in Takahori zogan? I have one in my collection but never encounter a similar mei....

 

This tsuba is signed Tada Harumitsu (Apparenrly Haynes H000827.0)

 

 

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  • Harumitsu 2 1.jpeg
  • Harumitsu 2.jpeg
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Bruno P.

#2 Ford Hallam

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 12:26 PM

Hi Bruno

 

the mei isn't inlaid (takabori zogan) but rather the background has been etched away with an acid.

 

So the mei was painted with some type of resist and then the piece placed in the acid to attack the metal that wasn't protected.

The apparently random, slightly raised, 'brush marks' were evidently created the same way.

This is why you can also see the dendritic structure of the brass where the metal has been etched.

 

I can't remember ever having seen this approach to creating a mei on tosogu and I have to say I'm a bit suspicious. Under the seppa that mei would recieve a bit of wear, which this example doesn't appear to have suffered.

Does it look like it was ever mounted?

 

Hope some of that helps.


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#3 Stephen

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 01:57 PM

Homer Simpson voice

 

"Dragoonnnns" 


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                                  Stephen C.

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#4 TETSUGENDO

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 02:24 PM

Bruno/Ford,

 

I have seen many Japanese metalworks using this technique- trays, vases, box's, okimono, ojime, netsuke, and Tosogu, etc.  Most, but not all, items were Meiji and later in date of manufacture.  Generally quality of workmanship ranges from fair to middling.  BTW, the raised mei on the seppadai does seem a poor choice indeed, perhaps it wasn't intended to be mounted.

 

Cheers, StevenK


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#5 Kurikata

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 09:20 PM

Thank you Ford and Steven. This tsubako died in 1825 and is not a meiji area Smith.

Therefore I might consider him as a precursor in such a technic.

Thank you for your interest
Bruno P.

#6 TETSUGENDO

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 10:52 PM

Bruno,

.

Avoid assumption as it leads to error.  I do not see where anyone has dated your tsuba.  Also, I did state that I have observed this technique in works earlier than Meiji and later as well.  Are you certain you have correctly identified the maker of your tsuba?

 

-StevenK



#7 Kurikata

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 09:38 PM

Steven,

 

For sure I have some doubt in the Tsubako identification. He is either Haynes 00826.0 (Hirata Harumitsu) or 00827.0 (Nara Harumitsu) who had an Hamano influence. But any information from the NMB community would be more than welcome.

 

Thank you


Bruno P.

#8 TETSUGENDO

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 11:08 PM

Bruno,

 

Until you are reasonably comfortable with an attribution you need to keep an open mind.  Sometimes choice number three is the most likely answer.  Best luck in your research.

 

-StevenK


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