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Tampa 2017


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#1 Grey Doffin

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 02:55 PM

Hi guys,

I'll be packing for Tampa in a week.  If there is a book from my site you'd like to buy and can pick it up at the show let me know.  I will take all my tsuba with me but I can't take all the swords.  If there is a sword you'd like to see/purchase let me know and I'll lug it along.

Stop past my table and say hello.  Grey  grey at japaneseswordbooksandtsuba.com



#2 GARY WORTHAM

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 05:58 PM

Will be at the Tampa show, and looking for Robert Haynes catalogs # 5 & # 10. If you have them. See you there.


Gary Wortham

#3 Grey Doffin

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Posted 31 January 2017 - 06:31 PM

Wish I did Gary but they are out of stock.  See you there.

Grey



#4 Stephen

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 01:52 PM

Any Photos, anyone? anyone? Bueller?


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#5 seattle1

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 04:34 PM

Hello:

 I know a photo is better than a thousand words, but I am going for the words. The Tampa Show promoted by Bill Green and his helpful wife was, as always, a worthwhile opportunity to see old friends, make some new ones, see lots of nice display material as well as things for sale, observe the dealer stock shuffle dance, and attend some of the side activities in rooms adjacent to the main show hall. There was the NBTHK, American Branch, hands on display of wakizashi covering the periods from Nanbokucho to shinshinto. Among the blades one of the most interesting was a recent Juyo Token, a well known and documented fully signed and dated hira-zukuri Ichimonji by Bushu Yoshioka ju Sukehide, 1363. Signed and dated Nanbokucho blades are uncommon, and Ichimonji of wakizashi length much less so. Among the others there was a Juyo Shikibu no Jo Nobukuni, a Echigo no Kami F/W Kunitomo, one of Horikawa Kunihiro's top students, a Suishinshi Masahide, and a terrific and powerful Satsuma no Kami Ason Motohira, done at age 75 in 1818. I had seen the latter blade before under bad light, but at the display the bright and gorgeous nie was like a cloth of sparkling DeBeers diamonds. I admire and congratulate all those owners who so generously put their treasures on display for rather risky shoulder to shoulder study. There were many other educational offering, proper sword handling, restoration discussion, cutting demonstration, Japanese archery, etc.

 While Bill did his best to put on a nice show, you couldn't help but note fewer table holders and a rather show pace of activity. Leading American dealers were present, several Canadian friends were in attendance, and there were a couple of men from Japan, one being Inami Ken-ichi,  of Japan Sword in Tokyo, and who I believe was the grandson of Inami Hakusui, the author of Nippon-To: The Japanese Sword (1948), beating John Yumoto's well known book published ten years later. The Inami book is still a worthwhile read.

 The usual auction night, Friday, took place, and I could not help but think it is an unexploited opportunity for a real draw. Various bits and pieces of swords, tsuba, armor, tea ceramics, and miscellaneous stuff was for sale, however it was more a "fun event" than an auction as the quality of most offerings was low and attendance was light. I realize that dealers bring material for table sale and the auction is a minor side show and perhaps a minor threat, however it could be a golden opportunity in the future if every table holder were encouraged to contribute at least one or two really nice items for auction, with reserves of course. Auctions are highly efficient ways to buy and sell, and provide low commission/premium (10% in Tampa), opportunities for buyer and seller.

 Anyway the show was well worth it, as they all are, and if the community allows them to die on the vine, the real cost to the collecting community won't be realized and appreciated until they are all gone. So look ahead: Chicago, Orlando, San Francisco...

 Arnold F.


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#6 Pete Klein

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 05:53 PM

The blizzard in the NE USA caused a number of cancellations at the last minute so a lot of friends who are usually there couldn't make it.  This has been an issue from time to time as February tends to see a lot of weather in the Northern states.  One of the reasons to live in Florida!


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#7 Stephen

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 03:02 PM

Thank you Arnold you're thousands words gave us a very clear picture, Pete, alas if i only could, but them king tides mate the KING TIDES!!! 


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#8 Peter Bleed

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 06:47 PM

There is little to add to what Arnold has already said. but I have to agree that the Tampa event was a success. It certainly was a bit smaller than past shows. And there were smaller piles of swords. The presence of two  (count'em 2) Japanese television crews added a bit of glamor to the event. It also suggests that swords remain of popular interest in Japan.

The range of swords for sale was very large, but it seemed that there were buyers for everything. Stuff was changing hands. It as also great fun to see lots of old friends.

I brought home two Sendai Shinto. The first was a recently polished mumei blade in shin-gunto mounts. It has nice masame-hada, but  it had not passed shinsa . .   . when it had a now  erased Kunikane signature. This sword was pointed out to me by Chris Leung who recalled my interest in the Kunikane group. The other is a very short katana signed  "Nagashige." This blade is a bit of a puzzle.  I have never seen another sword from this line and niji-mei signatures seem rather rare. These smiths seem not to have had connection with the Kunikane groups so I am not sure how to look at it. I am low on the learning curve on this one.

Weather in the northeast was not the only challenge to the event. My trip home involved one cancelled flight that had had problems in Mexico! 

Peter


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#9 Curran

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 10:49 PM

The blizzard in the NE USA caused a number of cancellations at the last minute so a lot of friends who are usually there couldn't make it.  This has been an issue from time to time as February tends to see a lot of weather in the Northern states.  One of the reasons to live in Florida!

 

I don't know if anyone from north-east of Virginia made it.  Maybe one person who came early?

I received a few phonecalls Monday from New York up to Boston, asking about the show.


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#10 GARY WORTHAM

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 06:19 AM

Ok, I went to the show, my 20 year anniversary for it.

 

To be real:  No new public, no new members to the study, the only action was dealers searching each other for a new item to sell.

 

I tried to buy and was ready, but nothing there. 

 

I feel this is the end to this show; and the future is left to the San Francisco show.

 

But, this is not a bad thing. The show in San Francisco show will grow to be even better than it is and the hope & future of this study, collection, and adventure.

 

So, the tables will sell out, the room will expand, all who know one another will be there, and the most important will be the new to the group, to bring life to the future.


Gary Wortham

#11 seattle1

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 05:29 PM

Hello:

 To bury a show is a kind of collective suicide for collectors because every show is a valuable contribution for person to person buying, selling, viewing, learning, and communicating all in one place and for which there are zero substitutes! The Tampa show was not a failure, the pace was slower, but as Pete and Curran pointed out the NE weather was a partial explanation.

 It is particularly useful to promote regional shows as driving distances are likely to become more important in the future. You can add to the risks of TSA baggage rumbling through and baggage handling risks, the future real possibility of a ban on flying with "weapons" of any kind, even in the hold. Bill Green has tried to host a show further north, Bob Elder will be putting on a nice show in Orlando this June (www.japaneseswordshow.com/orlando), Mark Jones' popular Chicago show is just around the corner, the San Francisco show is terrific, particularly for those who can drive on the west coast, and there was a show in Minneapolis last fall.

 If you have the time and inclination everyone of them is a jewel. We won't miss them until they are gone, and if we don't support all those we can, they will be gone.

 Arnold F.


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#12 raymondsinger

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 06:55 PM

I actually had the impression that there was something reasonably worth purchasing at any price level. It did seem that the best deals went by Friday evening though. One friend purchased a very nice signed and dated shodai Tadayoshi daito and another went home with a well-mounted Omi Daijo Tadahiro. In the first day of the show one of our local collectors bought a Oei Nobukuni wakizashi with what I am certain was a good mei, for less than $800. Bob Benson had a number of wonderful swords at a range of prices, from an Uda katana at $3k to a spectacular Tametsugu. Also worth mentioning was a set of blades by Yokoyama Sukenaga, the katana being one of the better examples I have seen from this smith, which went unsold at the end of the show at what I felt was a reasonable $10k. Myself, I could not resist buying a beautiful little katakiriba tanto by Yamato (no) Kami Kanekura (reference Compton III) in the last hours of the show Sunday.

 

 

 

 

I tried to buy and was ready, but nothing there. 


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#13 Curran

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 08:04 PM

As with a number of famous musicians in 2016, we also had pass 4 or 5 significant East Coast collectors that often have a table (or 2 & 3) in Tampa.

I very noticeably felt there absence and the 7 or 8 tables they usually inhabited.

The blizzards keeping away many of the NE crowd made the absence of friendly faces more acute.

Then there is the dividing issue of Tampa vs Orlando Show, with many of us only doing one or the other.

 

I was surprised to see the camera crews too.

On Saturday there were several groups of new-comers, mostly martial arts clubs, that weren't ready to be collectors yet. But then, I started out that way and it was a decade later that I began collecting.

 

For some of us the San Fran show is an impossibility. The reality it is that it is easier for me to do the DTI than it is SF in early August.

Hopefully that will change some day.


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