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Help Identifying Inherited Tsuba

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#1 Stu

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 03:35 PM

Good Day All,

 

I recently inherited a tsuba from my wife's family.  From my rudimentary research, it looks like it might be a Mino-goto Tsuba.  A contact I had here in Canada tells me that it's Edo period and dating around 1860-1880.  Can anyone provide some more insight?  I would love to know more about it for sentimental reasons of course!

 

Cheers!

 

IMG_1231.JPG  IMG_1232.JPG  IMG_1233.JPG

 

Stu


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#2 Greg F

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 04:33 PM

Hello ?
welcome, it is a rule here to sign all posts so we can address you politely. I think you are on the right track so far with your search.

Greg

#3 Stu

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 06:18 PM

Thanks Greg,

I have made the changes


Stu 

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#4 Brian

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 06:30 PM

Stu,

Mino Goto style yes...very typical of the lower quality type and kinda mass produced at the time. I don't think these can be dated so accurately, but probably sometime in the 1800's. Not a masterpiece, but still a genuine tsuba with some age to it. If you Google Mino Goto tsuba, you will see some of the top quality ones, and what is possible from that school


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#5 Gordon Sanders

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 06:49 PM

from my perspective and limited experience, the blackening seems forced, and almost like spraypaint.  is this normal?


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#6 Brian

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 06:50 PM

It's probably trying to emulate shakudo.


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#7 Stu

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 02:16 PM

Thanks for all your help Greg!

 

I did do a look up on Mino Goto and found a lot of similarities, but nothing that really matched mine.  It does appear to be old and it's in quite good condition.  Do you think I might be able to find more research on it, is it unique?

 

Are there any links that explains more about the Mino Goto school?


Stu 

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#8 Geraint

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 04:08 PM

Dear Stu,

 

You might also look up Nagoyamono.  Have a look at this one.  http://www.nihonto.u...AMONO TSUBA.htm

 

All the best.


Geraint

#9 Stu

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 07:08 PM

Wow Geraint!!

 

Thank you for the link.  It gave me something to look for, and I found this link with the same tsuba in it!

 

http://catalogues.le...&refno=10081147

 

The gold leaf on this one seems to be more visible.  It could mean a cleaning is needed.


Stu 

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“To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often” – Winston Churchill


#10 Stephen

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 07:22 PM

study up before you clean soft metal tsuba, you can scrub off the gold very easily. 


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#11 Gordon Sanders

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 08:59 PM

Are you sure this isn't a cast reproduction?
The Nanako is lacking in detail that you would expect.
It doesn't seem to be worn by age.

I might be off my rocker though, as I am a noooooob.
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#12 Stu

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 01:56 PM

Gordon,

 

It belonged to my Japanese wife's grandfather who passed away at 101 last year.  He was a Shinto priest in Gifu.  I have no reason to doubt that it's real.  With looking at it up close, it looks real to me.

 

With the similarities of the piece I found online that is Nagoyamono, and being that Gifu is close to Nagoya, it makes sense to me that it would be Nagoyamono.

 

I would love to hear from anyone that might be able to provide more details on Nagoyamono...


Stu 

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#13 Surfson

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 11:20 PM

Looks like a nice tsuba to me.  Nanako is pretty well done, lots of inlay with at least three colors of metal, the carving is good.   It's a nice family treasure.   You can try a very soft toothbrush and some mild dishwashing detergent with some warm water and it might clean up very nicely.  Cheers, Surf


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#14 Geraint

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 10:11 AM

Dear Stu.

 

This link will tell you more, http://www.shibuiswo...suba.htm#nagoya There is not a great deal of information out there that I have been able to track down, be glad if anyone else comes up with something.

 

All the best.


Geraint

#15 Stu

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 10:04 PM

Thanks so much everyone for your help!


Stu 

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